Army ranks and insignia of the Russian Federation

The Russian Federation inherited the ranks of the Soviet Union, although the insignia and uniform were altered slightly.

The Russian armed forces have two styles of ranks: army-style ranks and navy-style ranks. The army and air force use only army-style ranks.

Medium emblem of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation (27.01.1997-present)
Emblem of the armed forces of the Russian Federation
Medium emblem of the Russian Ground Forces
Emblem of the land forces of the Russian Federation

Ranks and insignia

The following is a table ranks of the armed forces of the Russian Federation. English translation is given first, followed by Russian version, then by English transliteration.

Officers

Category Troop ranks Parade uniform insignia Everyday uniform insignia Field uniform insignia NATO equivalent
Supreme officers
or
general officers
Marshal of the Russian Federation[Note 1]

(Ма́ршал Росси́йской Федера́ции)
(Márshal Rossíyskoy Federátsii)

RAF A F10MarRF since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-10-2010.svg Marshal polevoy pogon.png OF-10
Army General / General of the Army

(Генера́л а́рмии)
(Generál ármii)

RAF A F9GenArmy 1974-1991.png Russia-Army-OF-9-2013.svg OF09 Army general fu-2013.png OF-9
Colonel General / General

(Генера́л-полко́вник)
(Generál-polkóvnik)

RAF A F8ColGen since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-8-2010.svg 18gen3.png OF-8
Lieutenant General

(Генера́л-лейтена́нт)
(Generál-leytenánt)

RAF A F7LtGen since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-7-2010.svg 17gen2.png OF-7
Major General

(Генера́л-майо́р)

(Generál-mayór)
RAF A F6MajGen since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-6-2010.svg 16gen1.png OF-6
Senior officers
or
field grade officers
Colonel

(Полко́вник)
(Polkóvnik)

RAF A F5Col since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-5-2010.svg 15Polk.png OF-5
Lieutenant Colonel

(Подполко́вник)
(Podpolkóvnik)

RAF A F4LtCol since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-4-2010.svg 14podpol.png OF-4
Major

(Майо́р)
(Mayór)

RAF A F3Major since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-3-2010.svg 13mj.png OF-3
Junior officers
or
company grade officers
Captain

(Капита́н)
(Kapitán)

RAF A F2Capt since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-2-2010.svg 12kpt.png OF-2
Senior Lieutenant / First Lieutenant

(Ста́рший лейтена́нт)
(Stárshiy Leytenánt)

RAF A F1FstLt since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-1c-2010.svg 11stlt.png OF-1
Lieutenant / Second Lieutenant

(Лейтена́нт)
(Leytenánt)

RAF A F1-2Lt since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-1b-2010.svg 10lt.png
Junior Lieutenant / Lieutenant Junior Grade

(Мла́дший лейтена́нт)
(Mládshiy Leytenánt)

RAF A F1-3SubLt since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-1a-2010.svg 9mllt.png Acting Officer
Student officers Officer cadet

(Курсант)
(Kursant)

RAF A F0-Kur since 2010par.svg Russia-Army-OF-(D)-2010.svg RAF A R1Kursant 2010 field.png OF-(D)

Praporshchik and other ranks

Category Troop ranks Parade uniform insignia Everyday uniform insignia Field uniform insignia NATO equivalent
Praporshchik Senior Ensign / Chief Warrant Officer
(Ста́рший пра́порщик)
(Starshy praporshchik)
Rank insignia of старший прапорщик of the Soviet Army.svg Russia-Army-OR-9b-2010.svg 8stprp.png OR-9
Ensign / Warrant Officer
(Пра́порщик)
(Praporshchik)
Rank insignia of прапорщик of the Soviet Army.svg Russia-Army-OR-9a-2010.svg 7prp.png
Sergeants Petty Officer / Sergeant First Class

(Старшина́)
(Starshina)

Russia-Army-OR-8-2010.svg 6starsh.png
OR-8
Senior Sergeant / Staff Sergeant

(Ста́рший сержа́нт)
(Stárshiy serzhánt)

Russia-Army-OR-6-2010.svg 5stsg.png OR-7
Sergeant

(Сержа́нт)
(Serzhánt)

Russia-Army-OR-5-2010.svg 4sg.png OR-6
Junior Sergeant / Corporal

(Мла́дший сержа́нт)
(Mládshiy Serzhánt)

Russia-Army-OR-4-2010.svg 3ML.png OR-5
Soldiers and yefréytors Gefreiter / Lance Corporal / Private First Class

(Ефре́йтор)
(Yefréytor)

Russia-Army-OR-2-2010.svg 2efr.png OR-4
Private

(Рядово́й)
(Ryadovóy)

Russia-Army-OR-1-2010.svg 1pvt.png OR-1

Rank titles are sometimes modified due to a particular assignment, branch or status:

  • The ranks of servicemen assigned to a "guards" unit or formation are preceded by the word “guards”;
  • The ranks of servicemen in the legal, medical and veterinary branches are followed by “of justice”, “of the medical service”, and “of the veterinary service”, respectively;
  • The ranks of servicemen in the reserve or retired are followed by “of the reserve” or “in retirement”, respectively;
  • The rank descriptor "of aviation" was officially abolished but is still commonly used.

Rank reform (2008)

As a result of the 2008-2011 defence reform the Russian Army's 90,000 warrant officer positions have been removed but on 27 February 2013 the expanded board of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation, Russian Defence Minister S. Shoigu announced the return of the warrant officer to the Armed Forces of Russia.[1]

Insignia reform (2010)

On March 11, 2010, Law No.2010-293 of the President of Russia introduced a new set of rank insignia. Privates, airmen and seamen now wear plain shoulder epaulettes. Senior NCOs had their chevrons replaced by plain bars (small horizontal bars for corporals and sergeants increasing in number with seniority, large horizontal bars for staff sergeants, and vertical bars for master sergeants). These rank badges mirror Imperial Russian Army and 1970s Soviet Army insignia. Warrant officers and officers received new shoulder rank epaulettes and all general officer insignia now reflect service affiliation in the duty dress uniform. The parade dress gold epaulettes have been retained. The insignia for a marshal of the Russian Federation retained the coat of arms of Russia and the marshal's star.

Rank and insignia reform (2013)

In 2013 the insignia of an army general now include the marshal's star, surmounted by a red star in a wreath. Starting Spring 2013 the warrant officer ranks of the RGF were reinstated, the first appointments to be given out later that summer.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The rank of marshal of the Russian Federation, the highest in the Russian Army, is not presently held by anyone in the modern armed of the Russian Federation. The only officer to hold the rank is the former Minister of Defense Igor Sergeyev, who was elevated from commander (army general) of the Strategic Rocket Forces. As it stands, marshal of the Russian Federation should be considered an honorary title equivalent to a field marshal, marshal or five-star general in other countries, created in the event of a major war or as the result of extreme military accomplishment (see marshal of the Soviet Union).

References

  1. ^ http://www.5-tv.ru/news/72342/ in Russian

External

Glavny starshina

Glavny starshina (Russian: Гла́вный старшина́, IPA: [ˈɡlavnɨj stərʂɨˈna], lit. chief/senior petty officer) is the Russian Navy's second highest rank in the petty officer career group. The rank is equivalent to Starshij sershant in Army and Air Force, and roughly equivalent to OR-7 in the NATO rank system.

The rank was introduced to the Soviet Navy 1940 to 1943.

In the navy of the Russian Federation there are four ranks in the petty officer´s career group, which means:

Glavny starshina of the ship (OR-8)

Glavny starshina (OR-7)

Starshina 1st stage (OR-6)

Starshina 2nd stage (OR-4)Rank insignia Glavny starshina

Glavny starshina of the ship

Glavny starshina of the ship (Russian: Гла́вный корабе́льный старшина́; lit. senior petty officer of the ship) is in the Navy of the Russian Federation the designation to the most senior rank in the petty officer´s career group. The rank is equivalent to Starshina in Army and Air Force. Under the NATO rank system the rank might be comparable to OR-8 in Anglophone armed forces.

In the navy of the Russian Federation there are four ranks in the petty officer´s career group, which means:

Glavny starshina of the ship (OR-8)

Glavny starshina (OR-7)

Starshina 1st stage (OR-6)

Starshina 2nd stage (OR-4)Rank insignia Glavny starshina of the ship

List of military veterinary services

This is a list of Military Veterinary Services from around the world. Some are still active while others were disbanded, mostly around the decline of horses in military service.

In general, Military Veterinary Services provide care for service animals, public health services (food inspection, water quality), development assistance and research services. However each service varies significantly from others based on national mandates and interests.

Marshal of the Russian Federation

Marshal of the Russian Federation (Russian: Маршал Российской Федерации, tr. Marshal Rossiyskoy Federatsii) is the highest military rank of Russia, created in 1993 following the dissolution of the Soviet Union. It ranks immediately above General of the Army and Admiral of the Fleet (also called Fleet Admiral in some English-language texts), and is considered the successor to the Soviet-era rank of Marshal of the Soviet Union.

A Marshal of the Russian Federation outranks Generals of the Army (four stars), Colonel-Generals (three stars), Lieutenant-Generals (two stars) and Major-Generals (one star). It is roughly equivalent to American General of the Army and the UK's Field Marshal.

The only officer to have held the rank is the former Minister of Defence Igor Sergeyev, who had been elevated from the General of the Army of the Strategic Rocket Forces. Sergeyev was Marshal from 1997 until his death in 2006.

The insignia for Marshal of the Russian Federation is similar to the one for the Marshal of the Soviet Union, with the Soviet crest replaced by the Russian one. An officer who is given this rank would also wear the Marshal's star.

Rank insignia Marshal of the Russian Federation

Michman

Michman (Russian: мичман, IPA: [ˈmʲit͡ɕmən]) is a Russian and Soviet Navy rank. It is also used in a number of other countries. The rank is equivalent to praporshchik in the Russian and Soviet army and air force. According to NATO rank system the rank might be comparable to OR-9b in NATO armed forces. In the Russian Navy there are two grades of michman: michman and starshy michman.

While the rank michman is etymologically borrowed from the English rank midshipman, michman is a very senior and experienced enlisted rank, equivalent to a master chief petty officer or warrant officer, while midshipman is a cadet in training or a very junior officer rank (OF-1 in NATO naval forces), which, being an officer, is technically higher in rank than any enlisted rank, despite a midshipman's very junior status.

Military ranks of the Soviet Union

The military ranks of the Soviet Union were those introduced after the October Revolution of 1917. At that time the Imperial Russian Table of Ranks was abolished, as were the privileges of the pre-Soviet Russian nobility.

Immediately after the Revolution, personal military ranks were abandoned in favour of a system of positional ranks, which were acronyms of the full position names. For example, KomKor was an acronym of Corps Commander, KomDiv was an acronym of Division Commander, KomBrig stood for Brigade Commander, KomBat stood for Battalion Commander, and so forth. These acronyms have survived as informal position names to the present day.Personal ranks were reintroduced in 1935, and general officer ranks were restored in May 1940. The ranks were based on those of the Russian Empire, although they underwent some modifications. Modified Imperial-style rank insignia were reintroduced in 1943.

The Soviet ranks ceased to be used after the 1991 dissolution of the Soviet Union, although the military ranks and insignia of the modern Russian Federation and Ukraine have been largely adopted from the Soviet system.

Naval ranks and insignia of the Russian Federation

The Navy of the Russian Federation inherited the ranks of the Soviet Navy, although the insignia and uniform were slightly altered. The navy predominantly uses naval-style ranks but also uses army-style ranks for some specialisations, including naval aviation, marine infantry, medical and legal.

Podpolkovnik

Podpolkovnik (Russian: подполко́вник, lit. 'sub –, junior – , or lower regimentary') is a military rank in Slavic countries which corresponds to the lieutenant colonel in the English-speaking states and military.In different languages the exact name of this rank maintains a variety of spellings. The transliteration is also in common usage for the sake of tradition dating back to the Old Slavonic word "polk" (literally: regiment sized unit), and include the following names in alphabetical order:

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro and Serbia — potpukovnik (Serbo-Croatian: [pôtpukoːʋniːk])

Bulgaria — подполковник

Czech Republic — podplukovník (Czech: [ˈpotplukovɲiːk])

Georgia — ვიცე-პოლკოვნიკი (Georgian: [vitsɛ pʼɔlkʼɔvnikʼi])

Lithuania — papulkininkis

North Macedonia — потполковник

Poland — podpułkownik (Polish: [pɔtpuwˈkɔvɲik])

Russia — подполко́вник (podpolkovnik) (Russian: [pətpɐlˈkovnʲɪk])

Slovenia — podpolkovnik

Slovakia — podplukovník

Ukraine — підполковник (pidpolkovnyk)

Polkovnik

Polkovnik (Russian: полковник, lit. 'regimentary') is a military rank used mostly in Slavic-speaking countries which corresponds to a colonel in English-speaking states and oberst in several German-speaking and Scandinavian countries. The term originates from an ancient Slavic word for a group of soldiers and folk. However, in Cossack Hetmanate and Sloboda Ukraine, polkovnyk was an administrative rank similar to a governor. Usually this word is translated as colonel, however the transliteration is also in common usage, for the sake of the historical and social context. Polkovnik began as a commander of a distinct group of troops (polk), arranged for battle.The exact name of this rank maintains a variety of spellings in different languages, but all descend from the Old Slavonic word polk (literally: regiment sized unit), and include the following in alphabetical order:

Belarus — палкоўнік

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro and Serbia — pukovnik (Serbo-Croatian: [pǔkoːʋniːk])

Bulgaria, Macedonia, Russia and Ukraine — полковник (Russian: [pɐlˈkovnʲɪk], Ukrainian: [polˈkɔvnɪk])

Czech Republic and Slovakia — plukovník

Georgia — პოლკოვნიკი (Georgian: [pʼɔlkʼɔvnikʼi])

Latvia — pulkvedis

Lithuania — pulkininkas

Poland — pułkownik (Polish: [puwˈkɔvɲik])

Slovenia — polkovnikAlthough Georgia, Latvia, and Lithuania are not Slavic countries linguistically, they have been influenced by Russian terminology due to having been part of both the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union. Latvian and Lithuanian were also influenced by Polish terminology, due to those countries having been part of the Polish Commonwealth. The rank of polkovnik was also used in the Estonian army until 1924.

Ranks and insignia of the Red Army and Navy 1918–1935

In the period from 1918 to 1935 of the young Soviet Union any bourgeois military thoughts were put under general suspicion by the communists, the new political establishment. Among others, the Old Russian tradition to wear epaulets and shoulder straps as rank insignia was rigorously abolished and was replaced with a new tradition of rank designations and insignia for the new Red Army and the nascent Soviet Navy.

Ranks and insignia of the Russian Federation's armed forces 1994–2010

Ranks and insignia of the Russian Federation's armed forces from 1994 to 2010 were affected by the disintegration of the former Soviet armed forces, and there were other changes in insignia design when the newly established Russian Federation came into existence. The ranks depicted below were replaced with those adopted by decree № 293 of the President of the Russian Federation on 11 March 2010. The transition began with the issue of new military uniforms to the armed services in 2008 in the Moscow area and in 2010 nationwide. The ranks of marshal of the branch and chief marshal were officially abolished as a result of the 1994 regulations.

Ranks and insignia of the Russian armed forces until 1917

The Imperial Russian Army (Russian: Ру́сская импера́торская а́рмия, РИА) and the Imperial Russian Navy (Russian: Российский императорский флот) used ranks and rank insignia derived from the German model. However, the entire rank system was also closely connected to the Russian military traditions. In the aftermath of the Russian Revolution, the Red Army abolished the entire Imperial system of ranks and rank insignia, while military units and formations of the opposing White movement retained the Imperial rank system until 1923.

Ryadovoy

Ryadovoy (Russian: рядово́й, en: private) in the Army, Airborne troops, and Air Force of the Russian Federation is the designation of a member of the rank group of enlisted personnel. The rank is equivalent to matros (Russian: матрос) in the Russian Navy. In terms of the NATO rank-system the rank might be comparable to OR-1 in Anglophone armed forces.

The Imperial Russian Army used the designation ryadovoy before 1917. The word ryadovoy relates to the Russian ryad (Russian: ряд) , which in a military context means "file" or "rank" (in the sense of "rank and file"). The rank re-appeared in the newly-named Soviet Army in 1946, replacing the rank of "Red Army man" (Russian: красноармеец, romanized: krasnoarmeyets) used in the Red Army from 1918 to 1946.

In the armed forces of the Soviet Union (and later in those of the Russian Federation) yefreytor is the second-lowest rank of enlisted personnel. Using the NATO rank-system, the rank might be comparable to OR-4 in Anglophone armed forces.

Starshina 1st stage

Starshina 1st stage (Russian: Старшина́ пе́рвой статьи́; literal: petty officer first stage) is in the Navy of the Russian Federation the designation to the second lowest rank in the Petty Officer's career group. The rank is equivalent to Starshij sershant in Army and Air Force. According to NATO-ranksystem the rank might be comparable to OR-5 in Anglophone armed forces.

The rank was introduced to the Soviet Navy November 2, 1940.

In the navy of the Russian Federation there are four ranks in the patty officer's career group, which means:

Glavny starshina of the ship (OR-8)

Glavny starshina (OR-7)

Starshina 1st stage (OR-5)

Starshina 2nd staghe (OR-4)Rank insignia Starshina 1st stage

Starshina 2nd class

Starshina 2nd class (Russian: Старшина́ второй статьи́; literal: petty officer second class) is a rank in the Russian Navy. It is the lowest rank in the petty officer career group. The rank is equivalent to Junior Sergeant in the Army and Air Force. In the NATO rank system the rank might be comparable to OR-5.

The rank was introduced in the Soviet Navy on November 2, 1940.

In the navy of the Russian Federation there are four ranks in the petty officer´s career group:

Glavny starshina of the ship (OR-8)

Glavny starshina (OR-7)

Starshina 1st stage (OR-5)

Starshina 2nd stage (OR-4)Rank insignia

Military ranks and insignia by country
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