Army Black Knights football

The Army Black Knights football team, previously known as the Army Cadets, represents the United States Military Academy in college football. Army is currently a Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) member of the NCAA. The Black Knights currently play home games in Michie Stadium with a capacity of 38,000 at West Point, New York. The Black Knights are coached by Jeff Monken who is in his sixth season as head coach. Army is a three-time national champion, winning the title from 1944-1946.

With the exception of seven seasons (1998–2004) where the team was a member of Conference USA, Army has competed as an independent, meaning that they have no affiliation with any conference. Currently, Army is one of six FBS schools whose football teams do not belong to any conference; the others being BYU, Liberty, New Mexico State, Notre Dame, and UMass. However, all of these schools belong to conferences for all other sports. Army is primarily a member of the Patriot League, BYU is primarily a member of the West Coast Conference, Liberty is in the Atlantic Sun Conference, New Mexico State is in the Western Athletic Conference, Notre Dame is part of the Atlantic Coast Conference, and UMass belongs to the Atlantic 10 Conference.

Three players from Army have won the Heisman Trophy: Doc Blanchard (1945), Glenn Davis (1946), and Pete Dawkins (1958).[2]

The three major service academies—Air Force, Army, and Navy—compete for the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy, which is awarded to the academy that defeats the others in football that year (or retained by the previous winner in the event of a three-way tie). Army has won eight CIC Trophies, most recently in 2018.

Army Black Knights football
2019 Army Black Knights football team
Army West Point logo
First season1890
Athletic director(Open)
Head coachJeff Monken
6th season, 35–28 (.556)
Other staffBrent Davis (OC)
John Loose (DC)
StadiumMichie Stadium
(Capacity: 38,000)
Year built1924
Field surfaceFieldTurf
LocationWest Point, New York
NCAA divisionDivision I FBS
ConferenceIndependent
Past conferencesConference USA (1998−2004)
All-time record692–518–51 (.569)
Bowl record6–2 (.750)
Claimed nat'l titles3 (1944, 1945, 1946)
Unclaimed nat'l titles2 (1914, 1916)
RivalriesAir Force (CiCT)
Navy (rivalry, CiCT)
Notre Dame (rivalry)
Heisman winners3
Consensus All-Americans37
Current uniform
Independent-Uniform-Army
ColorsBlack, Gold, and Gray[1]
              
Fight songOn, Brave Old Army Team
MascotArmy Mules
Marching bandUnited States Military Academy Band
OutfitterNike
WebsiteGoArmyWestPoint.com

History

Army's football program began on November 29, 1890, when Navy challenged the cadets to a game of the relatively new sport. Navy defeated Army at West Point that year, but Army avenged the loss in Annapolis the following year.[3] The academies still clash every December in what is traditionally the last regular-season Division I college-football game. The 2016 Army–Navy Game marked Army's first recent win after fourteen consecutive losses to Navy. From 1944 to 1950, the Cadets had 57 wins, 3 losses and 4 ties. During this time span, Army won three national championships.[4]

Army's football team reached its pinnacle of success during the Second World War under coach Earl Blaik when Army won three consecutive national championships in 1944, 1945 and 1946, and produced three Heisman trophy winners: Doc Blanchard (1945), Glenn Davis (1946) and Pete Dawkins (1958).[5] Past NFL coaches Vince Lombardi[6] and Bill Parcells[7] were Army assistant coaches early in their careers.

The football team plays its home games at Michie Stadium, where the playing field is named after Earl Blaik. Cadets attendance is mandatory at football games and the Corps stands for the duration of the game. At all home games, one of the four regiments marches onto the field in formation before the team takes the field and leads the crowd in traditional Army cheers.[8]

For many years, Army teams were known as the "Cadets." In the 1940s, several papers called the football team "the Black Knights of the Hudson." From then on, "Cadets" and "Black Knights" were used interchangeably until 1999, when the team was officially nicknamed the Black Knights.

Between the 1998 and 2004 seasons, Army's football program was a member of Conference USA, but starting with the 2005 season Army reverted to its former independent status.[9] Army competes with Navy and Air Force for the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy.

National championships

Army has won five national championships from NCAA-designated major selectors.[10]:108–115 Army claims the 1944, 1945, and 1946 titles.[11]

Year Coach Selectors Record
1914 Charles Dudley Daly Helms, Houlgate, National Championship Foundation, Parke Davis[10]:111 9–0
1916 Charles Dudley Daly Parke Davis[10]:111 9–0
1944 Earl Blaik AP, Berryman, Billingsley, Boand, DeVold, Dunkel, Football Research, Helms, Houlgate, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, Poling, Sagarin, Williamson[10]:111 9–0
1945 Earl Blaik AP, Berryman, Billingsley MOV, Boand, DeVold, Dunkel, Football Research, Helms, Houlgate, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, Poling, Sagarin, Sagarin (ELOChess), Williamson[10]:112 9–0
1946 Earl Blaik Billingsley, Boand, Football Research, Helms, Houlgate, Poling[10]:112 9–0–1

Lambert Trophy

The Lambert-Meadowlands Trophy (known as the Lambert Trophy), established in 1936, is an annual award given to the best team in the East in Division I FBS (formerly I-A) college football and is presented by the Metropolitan New York Football Writers. Army has won the Lambert Trophy eight times; seven times under legendary head coach Earl "Red" Blaik in the 1940's and 50's, and most recently in 2018 under the tutelage of head coach Jeff Monken.[12]

Year Coach Record
1944 Earl Blaik 9–0
1945 Earl Blaik 9–0
1946 Earl Blaik 9–0–1
1948 Earl Blaik 8–0–1
1949 Earl Blaik 9–0
1953 Earl Blaik 7–1–1
1958 Earl Blaik 8–0–1
2018 Jeff Monken 11–2

Bowl games

Army has played in eight bowl games. They have a record of 6–2.

Season Coach Bowl Date Opponent Result
1984 Jim Young Cherry Bowl December 22, 1984 Michigan State W 10–6
1985 Jim Young Peach Bowl December 31, 1985 Illinois W 31–29
1988 Jim Young Sun Bowl December 24, 1988 Alabama L 28–29
1996 Bob Sutton Independence Bowl December 31, 1996 Auburn L 29–32
2010 Rich Ellerson Armed Forces Bowl December 30, 2010 SMU W 16–14
2016 Jeff Monken Heart of Dallas Bowl December 27, 2016 North Texas W 38–31 OT
2017 Jeff Monken Armed Forces Bowl December 23, 2017 San Diego State W 42–35
2018 Jeff Monken Armed Forces Bowl December 22, 2018 Houston W 70–14

Head coaches

Coach Seasons Games Wins Losses Ties Percentage
Hugh Mitchell (1918) 1 1 1 0 0 1.000
Geoffrey Keyes (1917) 1 8 7 1 0 .875
Ralph Sasse (1930–32) 3 32 25 5 2 .813
Joseph Beacham (1911) 1 8 6 1 1 .813
Dennis E. Nolan (1902) 1 8 6 1 1 .813
Charles Dudley Daly1 (1913–22) 8 74 58 13 3 .804
Henry L. Williams (1891) 1 7 5 1 1 .786
Biff Jones (1926–29) 4 40 30 8 2 .775
Earl Blaik (1941–58) 18 164 121 33 10 .768
Garrison H. Davidson (1933–37) 5 47 35 11 1 .755
John McEwan (1923–25) 3 26 18 5 3 .750
Henry Smither (1906–07) 2 10 7 2 1 .750
Leon Kromer (1901) 1 8 5 1 2 .750
Harry Nelly (1908–10) 3 22 15 5 2 .727
Edward Leonard King (1903) 1 9 6 2 1 .722
Harmon S. Graves (1894–95) 2 14 10 4 0 .714
Robert Boyers (1904–05) 2 18 11 6 1 .639
Herman Koehler (1897-1900) 4 33 19 11 3 .621
Dale Hall (1959–61) 3 29 16 11 2 .586
George P. Dyer (1896) 1 6 3 2 1 .583
Dennis Michie2 (1890–92) 1 6 3 2 1 .583
Jim Young (1983–90) 8 91 51 39 1 .566
Jeff Monken (2014–present)3 5 63 35 28 0 .556
Paul Dietzel (1962–65) 4 40 21 18 1 .538
Tom Cahill (1966–73) 8 81 40 39 2 .506
William H. Wood (1938–40) 3 28 12 13 1 .481
Ernest Graves, Sr.4 (1906–12) 2 16 7 8 1 .469
Bob Sutton (1991–99) 9 100 44 55 1 .445
Laurie Bliss (1893) 1 9 4 5 0 .444
Homer Smith (1974–78) 5 55 21 33 1 .391
Ed Cavanaugh (1980–82) 3 33 10 21 2 .333
Rich Ellerson (2009–13) 5 61 20 41 0 .328
Bobby Ross (2004–06) 3 34 9 25 0 .265
Stan Brock (2007–08) 2 24 6 18 0 .250
Lou Saban (1979) 1 11 2 8 1 .227
Todd Berry (2000–03) 4 41 5 36 0 .122
John Mumford (2003) 1 6 0 6 0 .000
  1. Charles Dudley Daly coached did not coach the 1917–1918 seasons.
  2. Dennis Michie coached 1 game in 1890, and then coached a full season in 1892.
  3. Jeff Monken's record through his fifth season (2018).
  4. Ernest Graves, Sr. coached the 1906 & 1912 seasons.

Rivalries

Commander-in-Chief's Trophy

Air Force, Army, and Navy have played each other every year since 1972 for the Commander-in Chief's Trophy. Air Force leads the FBS service academies with 20 victories, Navy has 15 victories, and Army has 8 victories (including the past two), with the trophy being shared 4 times.

Air Force

Air Force and Army meet annually and vie for the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy. Air Force leads Army 36–16–1 through the 2018 season,[13] and 33–14 in the Trophy series.

Navy

Army and Navy play each other annually in the Army–Navy game, which is also a part of the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy. This series is one of the oldest and traditional rivalries in the NCAA. They first met in 1890, and have played each other annually since 1930. The games are generally played at a neutral site. Navy leads the series 60–52–7 through the 2018 season.[14]

Notre Dame

Notre Dame is a rivalry which some feel has fallen into obscurity. In much of the early 20th century, Army and Notre Dame were considered football powerhouses, and met 34 times between 1913 and 1947. Though the rivalry has slowed down, they last met in 2016. Many media members considered the 1946 contest to be the "Game of the Century".[15] Notre Dame leads the series 39–8–4 through the 2018 season.[16]

Michie Stadium

Michie Stadium is the home stadium of the Army Black Knights in West Point, New York, which was opened in 1924. The stadium is named after the first Army football head coach, Dennis Michie. In 1999 the field was renamed Blaik Field at Michie Stadium in honor of Former Coach Earl Blaik.

Traditions

Songs
Alma Mater is the Army's school song. Army's fight song is On, Brave Old Army Team. Army also plays other organized cheers; Army Rocket Yell, Black, Gold, and Gray, and USMA Cheer.[17]

Mascot
Army's mascot is Army Mules. The Army Mules date back to 1899, being officially adopted by Army in 1936.[18]

College Football Hall of Fame

Name Position Years at Army Inducted
Bob Anderson HB 2004
Doc Blanchard FB 1944–46 1964
Paul Bunker HB/OT 1901–02 1969
Chris Cagle HB 1926–29 1954
Bill Carpenter TE 1957–59 1982
Charlie Daly QB 1901–02 1951
Glenn Davis HB 1943–46 1961
Pete Dawkins HB 1956–58 1975
Arnold Galiffa QB 1983
Ed Garbisch C/OG 1921–24 1954
John Green OG 1943–45 1989
Don Holleder 1985
Harvey Jablonsky OG 1931–33 1978
Doug Kenna QB 1942–44 1984
John McEwan C 1913–16 1962
Frank Merritt OT 1942–43 1996
Robin Olds 1985
Elmer Oliphant FB 1916–17 1955
Barney Poole TE/DE 1974
Bud Sprague OT 1926–27 1979
Joe Steffy OG 1945–47 1987
Alex Weyand OT 1914–15 1974
Harry Wilson HB 1924 1973
Arnold Tucker QB 1945–46 2008

Other notable players

President of the United States and General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower and General of the Army Omar Bradley were on the 1912 Army football team. Eisenhower was injured and his football career was over by 1913, when the two future generals were juniors. Bradley, a star of the Army baseball team for four years, was on the field in 1913 when Notre Dame upset Army in a historic college football game in which the forward pass was used for the first time. Bradley played end opposite the legendary Knute Rockne, the Notre Dame end who later coached the Irish to national championships before dying in a plane crash near Bazaar, Kansas, on Easter Friday in 1931.

Retired Numbers

No. Player Position Career Date of Retirement
24[19] Pete Dawkins HB 1956–58
35 Doc Blanchard FB 1944–46
41 Glenn Davis HB 1943–46
61 Joe Steffy OG 1945–47

Award winners

Doc Blanchard – 1945
Glenn Davis – 1946
Pete Dawkins – 1958
Earl Blaik – 1946
Tom Cahill – 1966
Tom Cahill – 1966
Bob Sutton – 1996
Jeff Monken – 2018[20]
  • Vince Lombardi College Football Coach of the Year
Jeff Monken – 2018[21]
Jeff Monken – 2018[22]
Glenn Davis – 1944
Doc Blanchard – 1945
Pete Dawkins – 1958
Joe Steffy – 1947
Andrew Rodriguez – 2011[23]
Andrew Rodriguez – 2011[24]
Andrew King – 2016[25]

Future Schedules

Schedules as of March 5, 2019.[26]

Week 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030
Week 1 Rice Bucknell (FCS) at Georgia State at Coastal Carolina at Ball State
Week 2 at Michigan at Rice Western Kentucky Ball State at UMass
Week 3 at UTSA at Tulane San Jose State at Tennessee North Texas
Week 4 Morgan State (FCS) Oklahoma Miami (OH) at Syracuse Syracuse Liberty Syracuse
Week 5 at Miami (OH) at Ball State Georgia State Dartmouth (FCS) at Syracuse
Week 6 Tulane at Wake Forest
Week 7 at Western Kentucky Eastern Michigan at Wisconsin Colgate (FCS) at Coastal Carolina
Week 8 at Georgia State Buffalo Wake Forest at LSU Coastal Carolina
Week 9 San Jose State UMass
Week 10 at Air Force Air Force at Air Force Air Force at Air Force Air Force at Air Force Air Force at Air Force Air Force at Air Force Air Force
Week 11 UMass at San Jose State Bucknell (FCS) at UMass Wake Forest
Week 12 VMI (FCS) at UMass UMass Hawaii Coastal Carolina Wake Forest at Wake Forest at UMass UMass at UMass
Week 13 at Liberty UMass at Liberty
Week 14 at Hawaii at Hawaii
Week 15 vs. Navy2 vs. Navy1 vs. Navy1 vs. Navy3 vs. Navy3 vs. Navy3 vs. Navy3 vs. Navy3
Week 16 vs. Navy1 vs. Navy3 vs. Navy3 (TBD) at North Texas vs. Navy3
  1. At Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia, PA
  2. At MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford, NJ
  3. At TBD

Current coaching staff

Staff as of March 19, 2019.[27]

Name Position First year position First year Army Alma Mater
Jeff Monken Head Coach 2014 2014 Millikin
Offensive staff
Brent Davis Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line 2014 2014 Georgia
Marcus Edwards Wide Receivers 2018 2018 South Florida
Sean Saturnio Tight Ends 2018 2014 Hawaii
Pat Tresey Offensive Line 2018 2016 Mount St. Joseph
Mike Viti Fullbacks 2016 2016 Army
Mitch Ware Quarterbacks 2014 2014 Southwest Missouri State
Tucker Waugh Slotbacks 2015 20071 DePauw
Defensive staff
John Loose Defensive Coordinator 2019 20142 Ithaca
Josh Christian-Young Safeties 2019 2015 Central Missouri
Kevin Corless Inside Linebackers 2014 2014 Northwest Missouri State
Daryl Dixon Cornerbacks 2019 2016 Florida
Matt Hachmann Outside Linebackers 2019 2019 St. Thomas (Minn.)
Kevin Lewis Defensive Line 2019 2019 Virginia Tech
Special teams staff
Mike Krysl Special Teams Coordinator 2018 2018 Central Missouri
Quality control staff
Matt Drinkall Offensive Quality Control 2019 2019 Western Illinois–Quad Cities
Rick Lyster Defensive Quality Control 2019 2018 Lafayette
Strength and conditioning staff
Scott Swanson Director of Strength & Conditioning 1998 19983 Wake Forest
Conor Hughes Head Football Strength & Conditioning 2019 2017 Springfield College (Mass.)
Rusty Whitt Assistant Football Strength & Conditioning 2019 2019 Abilene Christian
GC Yerry Assistant Football Strength & Conditioning 2019 2019 Stony Brook
Support staff
Clayton Kendrick-Holmes Chief of Staff/Director of Football Operations 2018 2018 Navy
CPT Blake Powers Admissions Support Officer 2018 2018 Indiana
Danny Payne Director of Scouting 2017 2017 Kennesaw State
Brett Moore Director of On-Campus Recruiting 2017 2017 Georgia Southern
Lawrence Scott Director of Player Development 2018 2018 Army
Justin Weaver Assistant Director of Recruiting Operations 2019 2017 Lehigh
Jack O'Reilly Director of Football Video Operations 2018 2018 Clemson
Michael Zeoli Assistant Director of Football Video Operations 2017 2017 William Paterson
Jim Collins Director of Player Personnel 2019 2019 Wittenberg
  1. Tucker Waugh also served as the wide receivers coach at Army from 2000 to 2004.
  2. John Loose also served as the linebackers coach at Army from 1992 to 1999.
  3. Scott Swanson also served as an Assistant Strength & Conditioning coach at Army from 1995 to 1996.

Radio

Radio rights are held by the Army Sports Network.

Current broadcast team

Army Sports Network
  • Rich DeMarco (play-by-play)
  • Dean Darling (color analyst)
  • Tony Morino (sideline reporter)
  • Joe Beckerle (pre and post-game)

See also

References

  1. ^ "USMA Publication Standards Manual Style Guide" (PDF). United States Military Academy–West Point. October 2, 2015. Retrieved April 7, 2016.
  2. ^ "Heisman Winners". The Heisman Trophy. Archived from the original on December 9, 2007. Retrieved 4 November 2012.
  3. ^ Ambrose (1966), pp. 305–06.
  4. ^ When Pride Still Mattered, David Maraniss, p. 135, Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, New York, NY, 1999, ISBN 978-0-684-84418-3
  5. ^ "Trophy Winners". The Heisman Trophy. Archived from the original on December 18, 2008. Retrieved 31 December 2008.
  6. ^ "Biography". Official Website of Vince Lombardi. Archived from the original on 30 December 2008. Retrieved 31 December 2008.
  7. ^ Biggane, Brian (15 November 2008). "Bill Parcells is Dolphins' Godfather". Palm Beach Post. Retrieved 25 January 2009.
  8. ^ Palka (2008), p. 197.
  9. ^ "Army Football to Leave Conference USA After 2004 Season". The Official Website of Conference USA. Retrieved 23 January 2009.
  10. ^ a b c d e f 2018 NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records (PDF). The National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  11. ^ "2018 Army West Point Football Media Guide" (PDF). Army Athletics. pp. 73–75. Retrieved 28 August 2018.
  12. ^ "ECAC Announces 2018 Football Teams of the Year and Lambert Awards". ECACsports.com. January 15, 2019. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  13. ^ "Winsipedia - Army Black Knights vs. Air Force Falcons football series history". Winsipedia.
  14. ^ "Winsipedia - Army Black Knights vs. Navy Midshipmen football series history". Winsipedia.
  15. ^ Boston College Even with Irish in Yardage, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, November 13, 1946.
  16. ^ "Winsipedia - Army Black Knights vs. Notre Dame Fighting Irish football series history". Winsipedia.
  17. ^ "> Alma Mater & Fight Songs". Army West Point website.
  18. ^ "> Army Mules". Army West Point website.
  19. ^ "Army Retired Jerseys". Army. Retrieved May 13, 2018.
  20. ^ "Maxwell Football Club Announces Army West Point's Jeff Monken as George Munger Collegiate Coach of the Year" (Press release). Maxwell Football Club. January 3, 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  21. ^ "Monken Recognized as the Lombardi Coach of Year". USMA Athletic Department. January 8, 2019. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  22. ^ "Army Head Coach Jeff Monken Wins 2018 President's Award". Touchdown Club of Columbus. January 4, 2019. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  23. ^ "Rodriguez Wins 2011 William V. Campbell Trophy". USMA Athletic Department. December 6, 2011. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  24. ^ "Andrew Rodriguez Wins Sullivan Award". USMA Athletic Department. March 20, 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  25. ^ "King Honored with Defender of the Nation Award". USMA Athletic Department. November 8, 2016. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  26. ^ "Army Black Knights Future Football Schedules". FBSchedules.com. Retrieved March 5, 2019.
  27. ^ "2019 Army Black Knights Coaching Staff". USMA Athletic Department. Retrieved March 19, 2019.

Bibliography

External links

1912 Army Cadets football team

The 1912 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1912 college football season. The team finished with the season with a record of 5–3. Cadets offense scored 108 points, while the defense allowed 59 points. On November 9, Army battled the Carlisle Indian Academy, which featured legendary athlete Jim Thorpe.

1944 Army Cadets football team

The 1944 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1944 college football season. Led by head coach Earl Blaik, the team finished with a perfect 9–0 season. The Black Knights offense scored 504 points, while the defense allowed 35 points. At the season’s end, the team won a national championship. The team captain was Tom Lombardo. In 1950, Lombardo was killed in action during the Korean War.

1945 Army Cadets football team

The 1945 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1945 college football season. The Cadets were coached by Earl Blaik in his fifth year and finished the season undefeated with a record of nine wins and zero losses (9–0). The squad was also recognized as consensus national champions for the 1945 season. For the season, the Cadets' offense scored 412 points, while the defense allowed 46 points.

1946 Army Cadets football team

The 1946 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1946 college football season. The Cadets were coached by Earl Blaik in his sixth year and finished the season undefeated with a record of nine wins, zero losses and one tie (9–0–1). The squad was also recognized as national champions for the 1946 season by several selectors. The Cadets outscored their opponents, 263 to 80.

This season's Notre Dame game at Yankee Stadium, a matchup of the top two in the rankings, is regarded as one of college football's Games of the Century; it was a scoreless tie.

1998 Army Cadets football team

The 1998 Army Cadets football team was an American football team that represented the United States Military Academy in the 1998 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their eighth season under head coach Bob Sutton, the Cadets compiled a 3–8 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 325 to 257. In the annual Army–Navy Game, the Cadets defeated Navy, 34–30.

1999 Army Black Knights football team

The 1999 Army Black Knights football team was an American football team that represented the United States Military Academy in the 1999 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their ninth season under head coach Bob Sutton, the Black Knights compiled a 3–8 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 317 to 225. In the annual Army–Navy Game, the Black Knights lost to Navy, 19–9.

2000 Army Black Knights football team

The 2000 Army Black Knights football team was an American football team that represented the United States Military Academy in the 2000 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first season under head coach Todd Berry, the Black Knights compiled a 1–10 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 372 to 224. In the annual Army–Navy Game, the Black Knights lost to Navy, 30–28.

2001 Army Black Knights football team

The 2001 Army Black Knights football team was an American football team that represented the United States Military Academy in the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their second season under head coach Todd Berry, the Black Knights compiled a 3–8 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 365 to 229. In the annual Army–Navy Game, the Black Knights defeated Navy, 26–17.

2002 Army Black Knights football team

The 2002 Army Black Knights football team was an American football team that represented the United States Military Academy in the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their third season under head coach Todd Berry, the Black Knights compiled a 1–11 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 491 to 226. In the annual Army–Navy Game, the Black Knights lost to Navy, 58–12. This loss began a 14-game losing streak by Army against Navy.

2003 Army Black Knights football team

The 2003 Army Black Knights football team was an American football team that represented the United States Military Academy in the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Black Knights compiled a 0–13 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 476 to 206. In the annual Army–Navy Game, the Black Knights lost to Navy, 34–6. Todd Berry began the year in his fourth season as the team's head coach. Berry coached the first six games, but was replaced by John Mumford who served as interim head coach for the final seven games.

2004 Army Black Knights football team

The 2004 Army Black Knights football team represented the United States Military Academy during the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season.

2005 Army Black Knights football team

The 2005 Army Black Knights football team represented the United States Military Academy during the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season.

2006 Army Black Knights football team

The 2006 Army Black Knights football team represented the United States Military Academy during the 2006 NCAA Division I FBS football season.

Had the Knights been bowl-eligible, they would have been invited to the Poinsettia Bowl.

2007 Army Black Knights football team

The 2007 Army Black Knights football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Black Knights, led by first-year head coach Stan Brock, competed as an independent and played their home games at the Michie Stadium.

2008 Army Black Knights football team

The 2008 Army Black Knights football team represented the United States Military Academy (USMA or "West Point") during the 2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season. Army competed as an Independent, with no conference affiliation.

The team was led by second-year head coach Stan Brock, who, amidst pressure from critics, had changed from the pro style offense to a triple option-like offensive scheme after the previous season. Some pundits dubbed it the "Brock Bone" or "quadruple" option, due to an added passing element. The team finished the season with a disappointing 3–9 record, which culminated in a 34–0 rout by archrival Navy. Brock was subsequently fired and replaced by former Cal Poly head coach, Rich Ellerson. The 2008 Army–Navy Game was the first shut-out of Army by Navy since 1978. One consolation was that in the game's final play, Army fullback Collin Mooney, in the last play of his college football career, broke the school record for single-season rushing by a single yard.

2009 Army Black Knights football team

The 2009 Army Black Knights football team represented the United States Military Academy (USMA or "West Point") in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) college football during the 2009 season. Army competed as an Independent, with no conference affiliation and were led by Rich Ellerson. The Black Knights finished the season with a record of 5–7.

2011 Army Black Knights football team

The 2011 Army Black Knights football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Black Knights were led by third-year head coach Rich Ellerson and played their home games at Michie Stadium. They competed as an independent. They finished the season 3–9.

2012 Army Black Knights football team

The 2012 Army Black Knights football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Black Knights were led by fourth-year head coach Rich Ellerson and played their home games at Michie Stadium. They competed as an independent. They finished the season 2–10.

List of Army Black Knights football seasons

The following is a list of Army Black Knights football seasons for the football team that represents the United States Military Academy in NCAA competition.

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