Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Armstrong County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 68,941.[2] The county seat is Kittanning.[3] The county was organized on March 12, 1800, from parts of Allegheny, Westmoreland and Lycoming Counties. It was named in honor of John Armstrong, who represented Pennsylvania in the Continental Congress and served as a major general during the Revolutionary War.

Armstrong County is included in the Pittsburgh, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Armstrong County, Pennsylvania
Kittanning Courthouse
Armstrong County Courthouse
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Armstrong County

Location within the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Map of the United States highlighting Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania's location within the U.S.
FoundedMarch 12, 1800
Named forJohn Armstrong
SeatKittanning
Largest boroughKittanning
Area
 • Total664 sq mi (1,720 km2)
 • Land653 sq mi (1,691 km2)
 • Water11 sq mi (28 km2), 1.6%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)65,263
 • Density103/sq mi (40/km2)
Congressional district15th
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.co.armstrong.pa.us
Footnotes:
DesignatedOctober 15, 1982[1]
USACE Crooked Creek Lake and Dam
The Crooked Creek Lake Recreation Area is a dam, reservoir, and park near Ford City in Armstrong County.

History

Armstrong County is home to the City of Parker, an incorporated third-class city, which was an oil boom town with a population rumored to be approximately 20,000 in 1873, but now is the "Smallest City in America" with a population of just under 800. Parker is located in the extreme northwest portion of the county.

Iron was made in the Brady's Bend area of the county twenty years before there was a foundry in Pittsburgh doing so. Ford City is home to the plate-glass industry, as John Ford created the company which later became Pittsburgh Plate Glass.

Kittanning once boasted more millionnaires than anywhere else in Pennsylvania during the 1880s.

Leechburg was the first place in the United States to use natural gas for metallurgical purposes, in 1869. Natural gas was found while drilling for oil, and eventually introduced into the boilers and furnaces of Siberian Iron Works here.

Freeport, Leechburg and Apollo were communities built along the Pennsylvania Canal, which passed through on the Allegheny and Kiskiminetas rivers, at the southern border of the county.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 664 square miles (1,720 km2), of which 653 square miles (1,690 km2) is land and 11 square miles (28 km2) (1.6%) is water.[4]

Streams

The Allegheny and Kiskiminetas rivers; Buffalo, Crooked, Cowanshannock, Redbank, and Mahoning creeks; and Carnahan Run, among others, have watersheds within the county. The Murphy, Nicholson, Ross, and Cogley islands are in the Allegheny in Armstrong County.

Scrubgrass Creek

Scrubgrass Creek arises in Wayne Township and flows through Boggs Township, passing Goheenville, to Pine Township where it empties into the Mahoning Creek at Mahoning Station.

Sugar Creek

Sugar Creek flows through Bradys Bend Township where it empties into the Allegheny River. Its tributaries include Cove Run, Hart Run, Holder Run, Long Run, Pine Run, and Whiskey Run.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18002,399
18106,143156.1%
182010,32468.1%
183017,70171.5%
184028,36560.2%
185029,5604.2%
186035,79721.1%
187043,38221.2%
188047,6419.8%
189046,747−1.9%
190052,55112.4%
191067,88029.2%
192075,56811.3%
193079,2984.9%
194081,0872.3%
195080,842−0.3%
196079,524−1.6%
197075,590−4.9%
198077,7682.9%
199073,478−5.5%
200072,392−1.5%
201068,941−4.8%
Est. 201865,263[5]−5.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2017[2]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 72,392 people, 29,005 households, and 20,535 families residing in the county. The population density was 111 people per square mile (43/km²). There were 32,387 housing units at an average density of 50 per square mile (19/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.32% White, 0.82% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.50% from two or more races. 0.43% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 34.6% were of German, 10.8% Italian, 9.3% Irish, 8.7% American, 7.4% English and 5.7% Polish ancestry.

There were 29,005 households out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.90% were married couples living together, 9.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.20% were non-families. 25.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.95.

The distribution of the age of the population in the county was 22.90% under the age of 18, 7.20% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 24.20% from 45 to 64, and 18.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.10 males.

Birth rate

Armstrong County's live birth rate was 890 births in 1990. Armstrong County's live birth rate in 2000 was 740 births, while in 2011 it had declined further to 680 babies.[11] Over the past 50 years (1960 to 2010), rural Pennsylvania saw a steady decline in both the number and proportion of residents under 18 years old. In 1960, 1.06 million rural residents, or 35 percent of the rural population, were children.

Teen Pregnancy rate

Armstrong County had 448 babies born to teens (age 15-19) in 2011. In 2015, the number of teen births in Armstrong County was 418.[12]

County poverty demographics

According to research by The Center for Rural Pennsylvania [1], which is a legislative Agency of the Pennsylvania General Assembly, the poverty rate for Armstrong County was 13.8% in 2014.[13] The statewide poverty rate was 13.6% in 2014. The 2012 childhood poverty rate by school district was: Allegheny-Clarion Valley School District - 37.2%, Apollo-Ridge School District - 46.6% living at 185% or below than the Federal Poverty Level, Armstrong School District - 48.9%, Freeport Area School District - 27.7%, and Leechburg Area School District - 39.6.[14]

Government and politics

Voter registration

As of November 7, 2017 there were 41,070 registered voters in the county. Republicans hold a tiny majority of the voters. There were 21,772 registered Republicans, 14,742 registered Democrats, 4,259 voters registered to other parties, 259 to the Libertarian Party and 38 voters registered to the Green Party.[16]

Chart of Voter Registration

  Republican (53.01%)
  Democratic (35.89%)
  NPA/Other Parties (10.37%)
  Libertarian (0.63%)
  Green (0.09%)
Voter registration and party enrollment
Party Number of voters Percentage
Republican 21,772 53.01
Democratic 14,742 35.89
Others 4,259 10.37
Libertarian 259 0.63
Green

38

0.09
Total 41,070 100%

County government

County Commissioners:

  • Pat Fabian (Democrat), Chairman
  • Jason Renshaw (Republican), Vice-Chairman
  • George J. Skamai (Democrat), Secretary

District Attorney:

  • Katie Charlton (Republican)

Sheriff:

  • Bill Rupert (Democrat)

Coroner:

  • Brian Myers (Republican)

Controller:

  • Myra "Tammy" Miller (Republican)

Treasurer:

  • Amanda Hiles (Republican)

Register of Wills and Recorder of Deeds:

  • Marianne Hileman (Republican)

Prothonotary and Clerk of Courts:

  • Brenda C. George (Republican)

Judges:

  • Kenneth G. Valasek, Senior Judge (Democrat)
  • James Panchik, President Judge (Democrat)
  • Joseph A. Nickleach, Sr. Senior Judge (Democrat)
  • Chase McClister, Judge (Democrat)

State Senate

State House Of Representatives

United States House of Representatives

Education

Map of Armstrong County Pennsylvania School Districts
Map of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania Public School Districts

Colleges and universities

Public school districts

The 498 school districts of Pennsylvania, that have high schools, were ranked for student academic achievement as demonstrated by four years of writing, science math and reading PSSA results by the Pittsburgh Business Times in 2010.

Technology school

  • Lenape Technical School - Ford City

Private schools

As reported by the Pennsylvania Department of Education - EdNA. April 2012.

  • Adelphoi Village Miller Home - Apollo
  • Divine Redeemer School - Ford City
  • Dry Knob Amish School - Smicksburg
  • Evangelical Lutheran School - Worthington
  • Grace Christian School - Kittanning
  • Meadow View School - Dayton
  • Model Education Program - Kittanning
  • New Bethlehem Wesleyan Methodist School - New Bethlehem
  • Orchard Hills Christian Academy - Apollo
  • Owl Hollow Amish School - Smicksburg
  • Shady Lane Amish School - Smicksburg
  • Shady Run Amish School - Smicksburg
  • Stony Acres Amish School - Smicksburg
  • Stony Flat Amish School - Smicksburg
  • United Cerebral Palsy Of Western Pennsylvania - Spring Church
  • Whippoorwill School - Smicksburg
  • Worthington Baptist Christian School - Worthington

Libraries

There are six public libraries in Armstrong County:[17][18]

  • Apollo Memorial Library - Apollo, PA
  • Ford City Public Library - Ford City, PA
  • Freeport Area Library - Freeport, PA
  • Kittanning Public Library - Kittanning, PA
  • Leechburg Public Library - Leechburg, PA
  • Worthington West Franklin Community Library - Worthington, PA

Communities

Map of Armstrong County Pennsylvania With Municipal and Township Labels
Map of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Cities and Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in at most two cases, towns. The following cities, boroughs and townships are located in Armstrong County:

City

Boroughs

Townships

Census-designated places

Census-designated places are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law. Other unincorporated communities, such as villages, may be listed here as well.

Unincorporated community

Former community

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Armstrong County.[19]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Population (2010 Census) Municipal type Incorporated
1 Kittanning 4,044 Borough 1803
2 Ford City 2,991 Borough 1889
3 Leechburg 2,156 Borough 1850
4 Orchard Hills 1,952 CDP
5 Freeport 1,813 Borough 1833
6 Apollo 1,647 Borough 1848
7 North Apollo 1,297 Borough
8 West Hills 1,263 CDP
9 West Kittanning 1,175 Borough 1900
10 Lenape Heights 1,167 CDP
11 Rural Valley 876 Borough
12 Parker 840 City 1873
13 Pleasant View 780 CDP
14 Worthington 639 Borough 1855
15 Dayton 553 Borough 1873
16 South Bethlehem 481 Borough
17 North Vandergrift 447 CDP
18 Manorville 410 Borough
19 Ford Cliff 371 Borough 1922
20 Elderton 356 Borough 1859
21 Templeton 325 CDP
22 Applewold 310 Borough 1899
23 Kiskimere 136 CDP
24 Atwood 107 Borough 1884

See also

References

  1. ^ "PHMC Historical Markers Search" (Searchable database). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 4, 2015.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved October 12, 2018.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved March 4, 2015.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 4, 2015.
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 4, 2015.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 4, 2015.
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  11. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Health, Birth Age County Reports 1990 and 2011, 2011
  12. ^ Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (2016). "Pennsylvania Teen Births 2015".
  13. ^ US Census Bureau (2015). "Poverty Rates by County Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates".
  14. ^ Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center (2012). "Student Poverty Concentration 2012". Archived from the original on December 22, 2015. Retrieved December 12, 2015.
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 14, 2018.
  16. ^ http://www.dos.pa.gov/VotingElections/CandidatesCommittees/RunningforOffice/Documents/2017%20Election%20VR%20Stats.pdf
  17. ^ Armstrong Libraries. Armstrong Libraries. Retrieved on July 23, 2013.
  18. ^ Freeport Area Library Association - Home. Freeportlibrary.org (July 12, 2013). Retrieved on July 23, 2013.
  19. ^ "Decennial Census by Decades". Archived from the original on December 6, 2013. Retrieved April 20, 2015.

External links

Coordinates: 40°49′N 79°28′W / 40.81°N 79.46°W

2013 Pittsburgh Metro Area SMALL
Map of the Pittsburgh Tri-State with green counties in the metropolitan area and yellow counties in the combined area.
Bethel Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Bethel Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 1,183 at the 2010 census.

Boggs Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Boggs Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 936 at the 2010 census.

Bradys Bend Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Bradys Bend Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 773 at the 2010 census.

Burrell Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Burrell Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States and is part of the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. The population was 689 at the 2010 census.

Cowanshannock Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Cowanshannock Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 2,899 at the 2010 census.

East Franklin Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

East Franklin Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 4,082 at the 2010 census.

Kiskiminetas Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Kiskiminetas Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 4,800 at the 2010 census making it the most populous township or borough in the county.Kiskiminetas is derived from a Native American language meaning "make daylight".

Manor Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Manor Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 4,227 at the 2010 census.

Maysville, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Maysville is an unincorporated community located within Kiskiminetas Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania.

McGregor, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

McGregor is an unincorporated community in Redbank Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The community lies along PA-839 at the junction with Porter Rd.

Milton, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Milton is an unincorporated community in Redbank Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States.

Mosgrove, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Mosgrove is an unincorporated community in Rayburn Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The community lies along the east side of the Allegheny River 7.0 miles (11.3 km) north of Kittanning via Pennsylvania Route 66.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in a map.There are 14 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted July 19, 2019.

North Buffalo Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

North Buffalo Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 3,011 at the 2010 census.

Sagamore, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Sagamore is an unincorporated community in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. Its ZIP code is 16250.

South Bend Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

South Bend Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 1,167 at the 2010 census.

South Buffalo Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

South Buffalo Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 2,636 at the 2010 census.

Sugarcreek Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Sugarcreek Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 1,539 during the 2010 census.

Washington Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

Washington Township is a township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 923 at the 2010 census.

Places adjacent to Armstrong County, Pennsylvania
Municipalities and communities of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States
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