Armenian Rite

The Armenian Rite is an independent liturgy used by both the Armenian Apostolic and Armenian Catholic Churches. It is also the rite used by a significant number of Eastern Catholic Christians in Georgia.

Echmiatsin altair
The Armenian curtained main altar of Holy Etchmiadzin

Liturgy

The liturgy is patterned after the directives of Saint Gregory the Illuminator, first official head and patron saint of the Armenian Church. Unlike the Byzantine Church, churches of the Armenian rite have a curtain concealing the priest and the altar from the people during parts of the liturgy, an influence from early apostolic times.

The order of the Armenian celebration of the Eucharist or Mass is initially influenced by the Syriac and Cappadocian Christians, then (from the 5th century AD onwards) by Jerusalemites, then by Byzantines (from circa the 10th century) and lastly by the Latins. The Armenians are the only liturgical tradition using wine without added water. They also use unleavened bread for the Eucharist, which has been their historic practice.[1]

From all the Armenian language anaphoras the only one currently in use is the anaphora of Athanasius of Alexandria. It became the standard anaphora of the Armenian church before the end of the 10th century and is a translation of the Greek version. In research it is often attributed to Gregory of Nazianzus, or to an older version of the Armenian anaphora of St. Basil or seen as a composite text.

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.svots.edu/content/beyond-dialogue-quest-eastern-and-oriental-orthodox-unity-today

Bibliography

  • The Armenian Liturgy, translated into English. archive.org. San Lazzaro degli Armeni (Italy). 1867. p. 95. Archived from the original on 2018-11-22. Retrieved 2018-11-22.

External links

Armenian Catholic Apostolic Exarchate of Latin America and Mexico

The Armenian Catholic Apostolic Exarchate of Latin America and Mexico (América Latina e México) is a pre-diocesan missionary jurisdiction of the Armenian Catholic Church sui iuris (Armenian Rite in Armenian language) in parts of Latin America.

It is exempt, i.e. directly dependent on Rome (notably the Roman Congregation for the Oriental Churches), not part of any ecclesiastical province.

It has a cathedral episcopal see Catedral Armênia São Gregório Iluminador, in São Paulo, Brazil and a Co-cathedral Nuestra Señora de Bzommar, in Montevideo, Uruguay.

Armenian Catholic Archeparchy of Aleppo

The Armenian Catholic Archeparchy of Aleppo (or Halab or Beroea) (informally Aleppo if the Armenians) is a non-Metropolitan Archeparchy (Eastern Catholic Archdiocese) of the Armenian Catholic Church sui iuris (Armenian Rite in Armenian language) in part of Syria.

It is directly dependent on the Armenian Catholic Patriarch of Cilicia, without being part of his or any other ecclesiastical province.

Its cathedral archiepiscopal see is the Marian Notre-Dame des Dons Armenian Catholic Cathedral, in Halab (Aleppo), Syria.

Armenian Catholic Archeparchy of Lviv

The Armenian Catholic Archeparchy of Lviv is a former, non-Metropolitan archeparchy (Eastern Catholic archdiocese) of the Armenian Catholic Church sui iuris (Armenian Rite). It existed in 1630 to 1944.

It is immediately dependent on the Armenian Catholic Patriarch of Cilicia, not part of his or any ecclesiastical province, and in Rome under the Congregation for the Oriental Churches.

Its former cathedral archiepiscopal see and a minor landmark of World Heritage, the Armenian Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary in Lviv has been turned into an Armenian Apostolic Church.

Armenian Catholic Church

The Armenian Catholic Church (Armenian: Հայ Կաթողիկէ Եկեղեցի, translit. Hay Kat’ołikē Ekełec’i; Latin: Ecclesia armeno-catholica), also referred to as the Armenian Uniate Church, is one of the Eastern particular churches sui iuris of the Catholic Church. They accept the leadership of the Bishop of Rome, known as the papal primacy, and therefore are in full communion with the Catholic Church, including both the Latin Church and the 22 other Eastern Catholic Churches. The Armenian Catholic Church is regulated by Eastern canon law, namely the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches.

The head of the sui iuris Armenian Catholic Church is the Armenian Catholic Patriarch of Cilicia, whose main cathedral and de facto archiepiscopal see is the Cathedral of Saint Elias and Saint Gregory the Illuminator, in Beirut, Lebanon.

Armenian Catholic Eparchy of Kharput

The Armenian Catholic Eparchy of Kharput was a modern eparchy (Eastern Catholic diocese) and remains a titular see of the Armenian Catholic Church (sui iuris (Armenian Rite in Armenian language).

Armenian Catholic Eparchy of Qamishli

The Armenian Catholic Eparchy of Qamishli is a suffragan eparchy (Eastern Catholic diocese) of the Armenian Catholic Church sui iuris (Armenian Rite in Armenian language) in the Patriarch's own ecclesiastical province 'of Cilicia', serving part of Syria.

Its cathedral eparchial (episcopal) see is the Cathedral of Saint-Joseph, in Qamishli.

Armenian Catholic Patriarchal Exarchate of Damascus

The Armenian Catholic Patriarchal Exarchate of Damascus is a pre-diocesan missionary jurisdiction of the Armenian Catholic Church sui iuris (Eastern Catholic, Armenian Rite in Armenian language) in part of Syria.

It depends directly on the Armenian Catholic Patriarch of Cilicia, without belonging to his or any other ecclesiastical province.

Its see is the Marian Church of the Queen of the Universe, in the Syrian national capital Damascus.

Armenian Catholic Patriarchal Exarchate of Jerusalem and Amman

The Armenian Catholic Patriarchal Exarchate of Jerusalem and Amman (colloquially Jerusalem of the Armenians) is the missionary pre-diocesan jurisdiction of the Armenian Catholic Church sui iuris (Eastern Catholic, Armenian Rite in Armenian language) in the Holy Land (Palestine/Israel) and (Trans)Jordan.

It is directly dependent on the Armenian Catholic Patriarch of Cilicia, not part of his or any ecclesiastical province.

Its Cathedral episcopal see is a World Heritage Site: the Church of Our Lady of Sorrows, Jerusalem.

Armenian Catholic Patriarchal Exarchate of Syria

The Armenian Catholic Patriarchal Exarchate of Syria (Syria of the Armenians) was a short-lived (1983-1997) pre-diocesan jurisdiction of the Armenian Catholic Church (Armenian Rite in Armenian language) in Syria.

Armenians in Poland

Armenians in Poland have an important and historical presence going back to the 14th century. According to the Polish census of 2011, there are 3,623 self-identifying Armenians in Poland.

Catholic Church in Georgia

The Catholic Church in Georgia, since the 11th-century East–West Schism, has been composed mainly of Latin-Rite Catholics; Catholic communities of the Armenian Rite have existed in the country since the 18th century.

A Georgian Byzantine Rite Catholic community, though small, has existed for a number of centuries but does not, however, constitute an autonomous ("sui iuris") Church. Canon 27 of the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches defines these Churches as under a hierarchy of their own and recognized as autonomous by the supreme authority of the Church. "No organized Georgian Greek Catholic Church ever existed", though, outside Georgia, "a small Georgian Byzantine Catholic parish has long existed in Istanbul. Currently it is without a priest. Twin male and female religious orders 'of the Immaculate Conception' were founded there in 1861, but have since died out." This was never established as a recognized particular church of any level (exarchate, ordinariate, etc.), within the communion of Catholic Churches, and accordingly has never appeared in the list of Eastern Catholic Churches published in the Annuario Pontificio.

Holy Trinity Cathedral, Athens

The Holy Trinity Cathedral (Greek: Ιερός Ελληνόρρυθμος Καθολικός Ναός Αγίας Τριάδας ) also called Greek-Catholic Cathedral of Athens Is the name given to a religious building affiliated with the Catholic Church which follows the Byzantine or Constantinopolitan rite and is located in the city of Athens the capital of the European country of Greece. Not to be confused with the Catholic cathedral of Latin rite, the Cathedral Basilica of St. Dionysius the Areopagite, nor with the Catholic cathedral of Armenian rite dedicated to St. Gregory the Illuminator.

It functions as the seat of the Greek Catholic Apostolic Exarchate of Greece (Exarchatus Apostolicus Graeciae) that was created on June 11, 1932 by the then Pope Pius XI.

It is under the pastoral responsibility of Bishop Manuel Nin.

Ordinariate for Catholics of Armenian Rite in Eastern Europe

The Armenian Catholic Ordinariate of Eastern Europe is an Ordinariate (quasi-diocese) of the Armenian Catholic Church (Eastern Catholic, Armenian Rite in Armenian language) for its faithful in certain Eastern European ex-Soviet countries without proper Ordinary for their particular church sui iuris.

It is exempt, i.e. immediately subject to the Holy See (notably the Roman Congregation for the Oriental Churches), not part of any ecclesiastical province.

Ordinariate for Catholics of Armenian Rite in Greece

The Ordinariate for Catholics of Armenian Rite in Greece or Armenian Catholic Ordinariate of Greece (informally Greece of the Armenians ) is an Ordinariate for the faithful of eastern rite (Eastern Catholic quasi-diocesan jurisdiction) of the Armenian Catholic Church (Armenian Rite in Armenian language) for its faithful in Greece.

It is exempt, i.e. directly dependent on the Holy See (notably the Roman Congregation for the Oriental Churches); not part of any ecclesiastical province.

Ordinariate for Catholics of Armenian Rite in Romania

The Ordinariate for Catholics of Armenian Rite in Romania (Romanian: Ordinariatul Armeano-Catolic), based in Gherla, is an ordinariate for Eastern Catholic faithful that is part of the Armenian Catholic Church, itself under the authority of the Pope. It serves Catholic members of Romania's Armenian community living in Transylvania.

Ordinariate for Eastern Catholic faithful

An ordinariate for the faithful of Eastern rite is a geographical ecclesiastical structure for Eastern Catholic communities in areas where no eparchy of their own particular Church has been established. This structure was introduced by the apostolic letter Officium supremi Apostolatus of 15 July 1912.In the Annuario Pontificio the eight existing ordinariates of this kind are listed together with the fifteen (pre-diocesan) apostolic exarchates. Of these ordinariates, four (in Argentina, Brazil, France and Poland) are generically for all Eastern Catholics who lack a 'proper' diocesan jurisdiction of their own rite in the particular country and who are therefore entrusted to the care of a Latin Archbishop in the country. The one in Austria is for Catholics belonging to any of the fourteen particular Churches that use the Byzantine Rite. The other three (Ex-Soviet 'Eastern Europe', Greece and Romania) are exclusively for members of the Armenian Catholic Church.

Raphaël Minassian

Archbishop Raphaël François Minassian, I.C.P.B. (Armenian: Ռաֆայել Մինասյան; born 24 October 1946) is a Lebanese-born Armenian Catholic hierarch. He currently serves as a Titular Archbishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia for Armenians and Ordinary of Ordinariate for Catholics of Armenian Rite in Eastern Europe (that is covering a territory of Armenia, Georgia, Russia and Ukraine) since 24 June 2011. Previously he served as a Patriarchal Exarch of Armenian Catholic Patriarchal Exarchate of Jerusalem and Amman from 26 September 2005 until 24 June 2011.

Sacramental bread

Sacramental bread, sometimes called altar bread, Communion bread, the Lamb or simply the host (Latin: hostia, sacrificial victim), is the bread used in the Christian ritual of the Eucharist (also referred to as the Lord's Supper or Holy Communion, among other names). Along with sacramental wine, it is one of two "elements" of the Eucharist. The bread may be either leavened or unleavened (appearing as a wafer), depending on tradition.

Roman Catholic theology generally teaches that at the Words of Institution the bread is changed into the Body of Christ (see transubstantiation), whereas Eastern Christian theology generally views the epiclesis as the point at which the change occurs. Some Protestants believe transignification occurs at the Words of Institution.

St. Gregory the Illuminator Cathedral, Athens

The St. Gregory the Illuminator Cathedral (Greek: Καθεδρικός Ναός του Αγίου Γρηγορίου του φωτισμού ) also called Armenian Church of St. Gregory the IlluminatorIs the name that receives a religious building affiliated to the Catholic Church that follows the Armenian rite and is located in 2 Rene Pio, Neos Kosmos in the city of Athens the capital of the European country of Greece. Not to be confused with the Catholic cathedral of Latin rite a Basilica dedicated to St. Dionysius Areopagite, and nor with the Catholic cathedral of Greek rite dedicated to the Holy Trinity.

It functions as the seat of the Armenian Catholic Ordinariate of Greece a jurisdiction created for Catholics of the Armenian Eastern rite that was established in 1925 under the pontificate of Pope Pius XI and directly under the administration of the Holy See.

Currently the ordinariate is vacant so it does not have a bishop responsible. Father Hovsep Bezazian is his apostolic administrator.

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