Arkansas's 1st congressional district

Arkansas's 1st congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in eastern Arkansas that elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives.

It is currently represented by Republican Rick Crawford.

Arkansas's 1st congressional district
Arkansas-first-congressional-district-2013
U.S. Representative
  Rick Crawford
RJonesboro
Area17,521 sq mi (45,380 km2)
Distribution
  • 44.5% urban
  • 55.5% rural
Population (2015)722,402[1]
Median income$41,413[2]
Ethnicity
Occupation
Cook PVIR+17[3]

Geography

2003–2013

AR-1-CD
The district from 2003 to 2013

Before the 2010 census, the 1st district represented portions of northeastern Arkansas, encompassing the counties of Arkansas, Baxter, Clay, Cleburne, Craighead, Crittenden, Cross, Fulton, Greene, Independence, Izard, Jackson, Lawrence, Lee, Lonoke, Mississippi, Monroe, Phillips, Poinsett, Prairie, Randolph, Saint Francis, Searcy, Sharp, Stone, and Woodruff.

2013–2023

The district took in additional counties in the southeastern portion that were part of the 4th district which in turn took the entire eastern Arkansas border. It fully encompasses the counties of Arkansas, Baxter, Chicot, Clay, Cleburne, Craighead, Crittenden, Cross, Desha, Fulton, Greene, Independence, Izard, Jackson, Lawrence, Lee, Lincoln, Lonoke, Mississippi, Monroe, Phillips, Poinsett, Prairie, Randolph, Saint Francis, Searcy, Sharp, Stone, and Woodruff. The district also encompasses parts of Jefferson county.

Character

The Mississippi Delta has long been home to American industrial agriculture, with cotton, rice and soybeans by far the biggest export from the region. The 1st District covers most of the Arkansas Delta area and stretches as far west to the Ozarks. The farming areas, despite their fertility, are generally poor by national standards, with unemployment and undereducation as some of the greatest problems. Rice farms are the amongst the greatest recipients of federal farming subsidization - and three of the top five subsidy farms in the United States are in the 1st District, receiving over $100 million since 1996.

Some manufacturing has been sited in the region recently, with several auto parts factories being built in Marion and Toyota considering it as the site for its seventh North American plant.

Jonesboro is the largest town, home to a sizable food processing industry with companies such as Nestle and Frito-Lay sited here. Jonesboro is also home to Arkansas State University (ASU)-Jonesboro. While Jonesboro itself sports a Republican trend, along with some of the hill counties, it is balanced by the strong Democratic presence in the African American-dominated Mississippi River Delta. The result is a fairly closely divided vote in national politics. While Al Gore narrowly carried the district in 2000 with 50% of the vote, George W. Bush won the district in 2004. The district swung even more Republican in 2008, giving John McCain 58.69% of the vote while Barack Obama received 38.41% here.

Recent election results from statewide races

Year Office Results
2000 President Gore 50 - 48%
2004 President Bush 52 - 47%
2008 President McCain 59 - 38%
2012 President Romney 61 - 36%
2016 President Trump 65 - 30%

List of members representing the district

The district was created in 1853 after the 1850 United States Census added a second seat to the state. The at-large seat then was split between this district and the second district.

Representative Party Year Congress(es) Electoral history
District created March 4, 1853
Alfred B. Greenwood Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1859
33rd
34th
35th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Hindman, Thomas Carmichael, 1828-1868-full
Thomas C. Hindman
Democratic March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
36th [Data unknown/missing.]
Civil War and Reconstruction
Logan H. Roots Republican June 22, 1868 –
March 3, 1871
40th
41st
[Data unknown/missing.]
James M. Hanks Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
42nd [Data unknown/missing.]
Asa Hodges Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd [Data unknown/missing.]
LCGause
Lucien C. Gause
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Poindexter Dunn Democratic March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1889
46th
47th
48th
49th
50th
[Data unknown/missing.]
William H. Cate Democratic March 4, 1889 –
March 5, 1890
51st Lost contested election
Lewis P. Featherstone Labor March 5, 1890 –
March 3, 1891
51st Won contested election
William H. Cate Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd [Data unknown/missing.]
Philip D. McCulloch Jr. Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1903
53rd
54th
55th
56th
57th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Robert B. Macon Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1913
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Thaddeus H. Caraway
Thaddeus H. Caraway
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1921
63rd
64th
65th
66th
[Data unknown/missing.]
WilliamJDriver
William J. Driver
Democratic March 4, 1921 –
January 3, 1939
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
[Data unknown/missing.]
Ezekiel Gathings
Ezekiel C. Gathings
Democratic January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1969
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
[Data unknown/missing.]
William Alexander, Jr
William Vollie Alexander Jr.
Democratic January 3, 1969 –
January 3, 1993
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
[Data unknown/missing.]
Blanche Lincoln official portrait
Blanche Lincoln
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1997
103rd
104th
Retired; later elected to the U.S. Senate in 1998
Rep Marion Berry
Marion Berry
Democratic January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2011
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
Retired
Rick Crawford, Official Portrait, 112th Congress
Rick Crawford
Republican January 3, 2011 –
present
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
Incumbent

Recent election results

2002

Arkansas’s 1st Congressional District House Election, 2002
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Robert Marion Berry* 129,701 67%
Republican Tommy F. Robinson 64,357 33%
Majority 65,344 33%
Total votes 194,058 100.00
Democratic hold

2004

Arkansas’s 1st Congressional District House Election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Robert Marion Berry* 162,388 67%
Republican Vernon Humphrey 81,556 33%
Majority 80,832 33%
Total votes 243,944 100.00
Democratic hold

2006

Arkansas’s 1st Congressional District House Election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Robert Marion Berry* 127,577 69%
Republican Mickey Stumbaugh 56,611 31%
Majority 70,966 39%
Total votes 184,188 100.00%
Democratic hold

2008

Arkansas’s 1st Congressional District House Election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Robert Marion Berry* 124,304 100%
Majority 100%
Total votes 124,304 100%
Democratic hold

2010

Arkansas’s 1st Congressional District House Election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Rick Crawford 93,224 52%
Democratic Chad Causey 78,267 43%
Green Ken Adler 8,320 5%
Write-in Write-ins 205 0.11%
Majority 14,957 9%
Total votes 180,016 100.00%
Republican gain from Democratic

2012

Arkansas’s 1st Congressional District House Election, 2012
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Rick Crawford* 138,800 56%
Democratic Scott Ellington 96,601 39%
Libertarian Jessica Paxton 6,427 3%
Green Jacob Holloway 5,015 2%
Majority 42,199 17.10%
Total votes 246,843 100.00%
Republican hold

2014

Arkansas’s 1st Congressional District House Election, 2014
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Rick Crawford* 124,139 63%
Democratic Jackie McPherson 63,555 32%
Libertarian Brian Scott Willhite 8,562 5%
Majority 60,584 31%
Total votes 196,256 100.00%
Republican hold

2016

Arkansas’s 1st Congressional District House Election, 2016[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Rick Crawford* 183,866 76.28%
Libertarian Mark West 57,181 23.72%
Majority 126,685 52.56%
Total votes 241,047 100.00%
Republican hold

2018

The 2018 election was held on November 6, 2018.

Arkansas' 1st congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rick Crawford (incumbent) 138,757 68.9
Democratic Chintan Desai 57,907 28.8
Libertarian Elvis Presley 4,581 2.3
Total votes 201,245 100.0
Republican hold

Living former Members

As of April 2015, there are three former members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Arkansas's 1st congressional district that are currently living.

Representative Term in office Date of birth (and age)
Bill Alexander 1969–1993 January 16, 1934 (age 85)
Blanche Lincoln 1993–1997 September 30, 1960 (age 58)
Marion Berry 1997–2011 August 27, 1942 (age 76)

See also

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=05&cd=01
  3. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  4. ^ 2016 election results

Coordinates: 35°17′38″N 91°15′30″W / 35.29389°N 91.25833°W

2006 United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas

The 2006 United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas were held on November 4, 2006 to determine who will represent the state of Arkansas in the United States House of Representatives. Arkansas has four seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms. Every incumbent won re-election easily.

2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas

The 2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Arkansas in the United States House of Representatives. Arkansas has four seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincides with the 2008 presidential election.

No incumbent was opposed by a candidate from the other major party. The Green Party of Arkansas is the only opponent to the incumbent in most districts. This is the largest number of congressional candidates fielded by an Arkansas party other than the Democratic or Republican parties since the People's Party in 1894. All incumbents were reelected. As of 2016, this is the last election in which Democrats won a majority of congressional districts in Arkansas.

AR-1

AR-1 may refer to

AR-1 (rocket engine)

Arkansas's 1st congressional district

Arkansas Highway 1

An Acoustic Research corporation loudspeaker, famous as the first acoustic suspension speaker.

The USS Medusa (AR-1), the first US Navy repair ship

AR-1 (multiple rocket launcher)

The AR-1 "Parasniper", a bolt-action rifle manufactured by ArmaLite

Alfred B. Greenwood

Alfred Burton Greenwood (July 11, 1811 – October 4, 1889) was an attorney and a politician; he was elected to the United States and Confederate congresses as a Democrat. In 1859 he was appointed under President James Buchanan as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and resigned when Arkansas seceded from the Union in 1861.

Asa Hodges

Asa Hodges (January 22, 1822 – June 6, 1900) was a one-term U.S. Representative for Arkansas's 1st congressional district, with service from 1873 to 1875.

Born near Moulton in Lawrence County in northern Alabama, Hodges moved to Marion in Crittenden County in northeastern Arkansas. He attended La Grange Male and Female College in LaGrange, Missouri, now part of Hannibal-LaGrange University in Hannibal, Missouri. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1848, and practiced until 1860. Prior to the American Civil War, Hodges owned a large number of slaves near Memphis, Tennessee.

He served as delegate to the Arkansas constitutional convention in 1867. He was a member of the Arkansas House of Representatives for a partial term in 1868 and the Arkansas Senate from 1870 to 1873.

Hodges was elected as a Republican to the 43rd United States Congress (March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875) to Arkansas' First District. He did not seek reelection in 1874 to the Forty-fourth Congress and was succeeded by the Democrat Lucien C. Gause. Thereafter, he engaged in farming.

Blanche Lincoln

Blanche Meyers Lambert Lincoln (born September 30, 1960) is an American politician and lawyer who served as a U.S. Senator from Arkansas from 1999 to 2011. A member of the Democratic Party, Lincoln was first elected to the Senate in 1998; she was the first woman elected to the Senate from Arkansas since Hattie Caraway in 1932 and, at age 38, was the youngest woman ever elected to the Senate. She previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives, representing Arkansas's 1st congressional district from 1993 to 1997.

Lincoln was the first woman and the first Arkansan to serve as chair of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry. She also served as the Chair of Rural Outreach for the Senate Democratic Caucus. In 2010, she ran for a third term, but was defeated by Republican John Boozman, whose brother, Fay Boozman, she defeated in 1998.Today, she is the Founder and a Principal of Lincoln Policy Group, a consulting firm that assist its clients in successfully navigating the legislative and regulatory bureaucracies of the federal government.

Crittenden County, Arkansas

Crittenden County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 50,902. The county seat is Marion, and the largest city is West Memphis. Crittenden County is Arkansas's twelfth county, formed October 22, 1825, and named for Robert Crittenden, the first Secretary of the Arkansas Territory.

Crittenden County is part of the Memphis, TN-MS-AR Metropolitan Statistical Area. Most of the county's media comes from Memphis, although some Little Rock TV (Arkansas Educational Television Network, KATV) is imported by Comcast Cable. It lies within Arkansas's 1st congressional district.

Ezekiel C. Gathings

Ezekiel Candler "Took" Gathings (November 10, 1903 – May 2, 1979) was a U.S. Representative from Arkansas, representing Arkansas' First Congressional District from 1939 to 1969. A conservative and segregationist, Gathings was an ally of Strom Thurmond, and stood against all civil rights legislation. Gathings also chaired the 1952 House Select Committee on Current Pornographic Materials, which advocated for censorship of obscene magazines, books, and comics.

James M. Hanks

James Millander Hanks (February 12, 1833 – May 24, 1909) was a U.S. Representative from Arkansas.

Born in Helena, Arkansas, Hanks attended the public schools, the college at New Albany, Indiana, and Jackson College, Columbia, Tennessee.

He studied law.

He was graduated from the University of Louisville in 1855.

He was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Helena.

He served as judge of the first judicial district of Arkansas 1864-1868.

Hanks was elected as a Democrat to the Forty-second Congress (March 4, 1871 – March 3, 1873).

He was not a candidate for renomination in 1872.

He engaged in agricultural pursuits.

He died in Helena, Arkansas

He was interred in Maple Hill Cemetery.

Lewis P. Featherstone

Lewis Porter Featherstone (July 28, 1851 – March 14, 1922) was a planter and farm activist who served as a Labor Party U.S. Representative from Arkansas.

Lucien C. Gause

Lucien Coatsworth Gause (December 25, 1836 – November 5, 1880) was an American nineteenth-century politician and lawyer from Arkansas.

Poindexter Dunn

Poindexter Dunn (November 3, 1834 – October 12, 1914) was an American politician and a U.S. Representative from Arkansas.

Rick Crawford (politician)

Eric Alan "Rick" Crawford (born January 22, 1966) is an American politician who has been the U.S. Representative for Arkansas's 1st congressional district since 2011. He is a member of the Republican Party. Before he was elected to Congress, Crawford was a radio announcer, businessman and a soldier in the United States Army.

Robert B. Macon

Robert Bruce Macon (July 6, 1859 – October 9, 1925) was a U.S. Representative from Arkansas.

Born near Trenton, Arkansas, Macon was left an orphan at the age of nine.

He attended the public schools and studied at home.

He engaged in agricultural pursuits.

He studied law.

He was admitted to the bar in 1891 and commenced practice in Helena, Arkansas.

He served as member of the State house of representatives 1883-1887.

He served as clerk of the circuit court 1892-1896.

He served as prosecuting attorney for the first judicial district 1898-1902.

Macon was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-eighth and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1913).

He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination.

He continued the practice of law in Helena, Arkansas, until he retired in 1917.

He died in Marvell, Arkansas, October 9, 1925.

He was interred in Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee.

Robert Marion Berry

Robert Marion Berry (born August 27, 1942) is an American politician who was the U.S. Representative for Arkansas's 1st congressional district from 1997 to 2011. He is a member of the Democratic Party.

Thaddeus H. Caraway

Thaddeus Horatius Caraway (October 17, 1871 – November 6, 1931) was a Democratic Party politician from the U.S. state of Arkansas who represented the state first in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1913 to 1921 and then in the U.S. Senate from 1921 until his death.

Thomas C. Hindman

Thomas C. Hindman (born Thomas Carmichael Hindman, Jr.; January 28, 1828 – September 27, 1868) was a lawyer, United States Representative from the 1st Congressional District of Arkansas, and Major-General in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.Shortly after he was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, Hindman moved with his family to Jacksonville, Alabama, and later Ripley, Mississippi. After receiving his primary education in Ripley, he attended the Lawrenceville Classical Institute (now known as the Lawrenceville School) and graduated with honors. Afterwards, he raised a company in Tippah County for the 2nd Mississippi regiment in the Mexican–American War. Hindman served during the war as a lieutenant and later as a captain of his company. After the war, he returned to Ripley. He studied law, and was admitted to the state bar in 1851. He started a law practice in Ripley, and served as a member of the Mississippi House of Representatives from 1854 to 1856.

Hindman moved his law practice to Helena, Arkansas after his term in the Mississippi House ended. He was elected as the Democratic Representative from Arkansas's 1st congressional district in the Thirty-sixth Congress from March 4, 1859 to March 4, 1861. He was re-elected to the Thirty-seventh Congress, but declined to serve after the onset of the Civil War and Arkansas' secession from the Union. Instead, Hindman joined the armed forces of the Confederacy. He was promoted to brigadier general on September 28, 1861, and to major general on April 18, 1862. He commanded the Trans-Mississippi Department, and later raised and commanded "Hindman's Legion" for the Confederate States Army. After the war, Hindman avoided surrender to the federal government by fleeing to Mexico City. He worked in Mexico as a coffee planter and attempted to practice law. After the execution of Maximilian I of Mexico in 1867, Hindman submitted a petition for a pardon to President Andrew Johnson, but it was denied. Hindman, nonetheless, returned to his former life in Helena. He became the leader of the "Young Democracy", a new political organization that was willing to accept the Reconstruction for the restoration of the Union. He was assassinated on September 27, 1868 at his Helena home.

William H. Cate

William Henderson Cate (November 11, 1839 – August 23, 1899) was an American politician, a judge, and a U.S. Representative from Arkansas.

William J. Driver

William Joshua Driver (March 2, 1873 – October 1, 1948) was an American politician and a U.S. Representative from Arkansas.

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