Area code 917

Area code 917 is an area code for all five boroughs of New York City (The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island). It was the first cellular/pager/voicemail area code for the city and is an overlay to Manhattan's 212/646/332 and the other four boroughs' 718/347/929. Occasionally, 917 is also assigned to landlines, most commonly in Manhattan, in large part because of the particularly severe shortage of numbers there.

Introduced on February 4, 1992,[1] area code 917 is the first overlay area code in the North American Numbering Plan. When it was established, all cellphones in New York City were switched to 917, freeing up telephone numbers for additional landlines.[2]

Shortly after its implementation, the Federal Communications Commission announced that any new area codes going forth must not be service-specific, but did grandfather 917 from that rule. It is the last area code added under the original X1X format whose last digit was not 0.

In 1990, The New York Telephone Company wanted cellphones and pagers in Manhattan and all telephone lines in The Bronx to be assigned area code 917. The New York State Public Service Commission denied the request and chose the present configuration.[3]

Area code 917
The blue area is New York State (outside the City of New York); the red area is area code 917 and overlay

See also

References

  1. ^ "Bell Atlantic Ready to Introduce New 347 Area Code; New Area Code to Join 718 to Serve The Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island". Retrieved December 17, 2009.
  2. ^ http://www.nanpa.com/pdf/old_pl/IL%2091-08-001.pdf
  3. ^ McFadden, Robert D. "917 Area Code Is Proposed For the Bronx". The New York Times. June 5, 1990.

External links

New York area codes: 212/332/646, 315/680, 347/718/929, 516, 518/838, 585, 607, 631/934, 716, 845, 914, 917
North: 914, 845, 203/475
West: 201/551, 862/973, 908 Area code 917 (overlays both 212/646/332 and 718/347/929) East: 516, 631
South: 732/848
New Jersey area codes: 201/551, 609, 732/848, 856, 862/973, 908
Connecticut area codes: 203/475, 860/959

Coordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′39″W / 40.72833°N 73.99417°W

Area codes 212, 646, and 332

Area codes 212, 646 and 332 are area codes for most of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. By area, it is one of the smallest numbering plan areas in the North American Numbering Plan. These area codes are overlaid by area code 917, which covers the entirety of New York City.

Area codes 718, 347, and 929

North American area codes 718, 347, and 929 are New York City telephone area codes in the boroughs of The Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island, as well as the Marble Hill section of Manhattan. They are overlaid by area code 917, which covers the entirety of New York City.

North American Numbering Plan

The North American Numbering Plan (NANP) is a telephone numbering plan that encompasses twenty-five distinct regions in twenty countries primarily in North America, including the Caribbean. Some North American countries, most notably Mexico, do not participate in the NANP.

The NANP was originally devised in the 1940s by AT&T for the Bell System and independent telephone operators in North America to unify the diverse local numbering plans that had been established in the preceding decades. AT&T continued to administer the numbering plan until the breakup of the Bell System, when administration was delegated to the North American Numbering Plan Administration (NANPA), a service that has been procured from the private sector by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States. Each participating country forms a regulatory authority that has plenary control over local numbering resources. The FCC also serves as the U.S. regulator. Canadian numbering decisions are made by the Canadian Numbering Administration Consortium.The NANP divides the territories of its members into numbering plan areas (NPAs) which are encoded numerically with a three-digit telephone number prefix, commonly called the area code. Each telephone is assigned a seven-digit telephone number unique only within its respective plan area. The telephone number consists of a three-digit central office code and a four-digit station number. The combination of an area code and the telephone number serves as a destination routing address in the public switched telephone network (PSTN). For international call routing, the NANP has been assigned the international calling code 1 by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU). The North American Numbering Plan conforms with ITU Recommendation E.164, which establishes an international numbering framework.

Overlay plan

In telecommunications, an overlay is an additional area code that is introduced into the same geographic region already served by the North American Numbering Plan (NANP).

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