Arctic Cathedral

Tromsdalen Church or the Arctic Cathedral (Norwegian: Tromsdalen kirke, Ishavskatedralen) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the Tromsdalen valley on the east side of the city of Tromsø. It is the church for the Tromsøysund parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The modern concrete and metal church was built in a long church style in 1965 by the architect Jan Inge Hovig. The church seats about 600 people.[4][5]

Tromsdalen Church
Arctic Cathedral (Ishavskatedralen)
Tromsøysund kirke / Tromsdalen kirke
Arctic Cathedral illuminated by the midnight sun
View of the church
Tromsdalen Church is located in Troms
Tromsdalen Church
Tromsdalen Church
Location in Troms
Tromsdalen Church is located in Norway
Tromsdalen Church
Tromsdalen Church
Tromsdalen Church (Norway)
Coordinates: 69°38′54″N 18°59′14″E / 69.6482°N 18.9871°E
LocationTromsø, Troms
CountryNorway
DenominationChurch of Norway
ChurchmanshipEvangelical Lutheran
Websitehttp://www.ishavskatedralen.no
History
StatusParish church
Consecrated19 November 1965[1]
Architecture
Functional statusActive
Architect(s)Jan Inge Hovig[2]
Architectural typeLong church
Groundbreaking1 April 1964[3]
Completed1965
Construction cost4,169,815 kr[3]
Specifications
Capacity600
MaterialsCast-in-place aluminium-coated
concrete panels [2]
Administration
ParishTromsøysund
DeaneryTromsø domprosti
DioceseNord-Hålogaland

Name

Formally, the church is named Tromsdalen Church or sometimes Tromsøysund Church (Norwegian: Tromsdalen kirke or Tromsøysund kirke). The church is commonly nicknamed the Ishavskatedralen which literally means "The Cathedral of the Arctic Sea" or simply the "Arctic Cathedral". Despite its nickname, it is a parish church and not, in fact, a cathedral as it is commonly called.[1]

Construction

The church was designed by the architect Jan Inge Hovig and is built mainly of concrete. The main contractor for the construction was Ing. F. Selmer A/S Tromsø.[3] Because of the church's distinct look and situation, it has been called "the opera house of Norway", likening it to the famous Sydney Opera House in Sydney, Australia. The church is one of the most notable churches in Tromsø due to its design, although Tromsø does have another church of interest, Tromsø Cathedral, which is noted for being the only wooden cathedral in Norway.

The groundbreaking of the church was 1 April 1964 and it was completed in 1965.[3] The new church was consecrated on 19 November 1965 by the Bishop Monrad Norderval.[1] The church is built out of cast-in-place aluminium-coated concrete panels.[2]

In 1972, a glass mosaic was added to the eastern side, made by Victor Sparre.[2] The church acquired an organ built by Grönlunds Orgelbyggeri in 2005, with three manuals, pedal, 42 stops, and 2940 pipes.[1] It replaced the old opus nr. 12 organ delivered by Vestlandske Orgelverksted, Hareid, which had 22 voices and 124 keys.

Gallery

Arctic Cathedral Midnight Sun
2010-08-02 - Tromsø - Eismeerkathedrale - Ansicht von vorne - panoramio
2010-08-02 - Tromsø - Eismeerkathedrale - Ansicht von hinten - panoramio
85668 Tromsdalen kirkested - Ishavskatedralen from bridge
Inside the Arctic Cathedral
Tromsø arctic cathedral
Tromsø Midnight Sun 2
Tromsø 2015
Tromsø arctic cathedral
2010-08-02 - Tromsø - Innenansicht der Eismeerkathedrale - panoramio
Ishavskatedralenimidnattsso
Cathedral from across Tromsøysund in the evening (2006-03) - panoramio
Norwegen tromso eismeerkathedrale
Tromsö Eismeerkathedrale Innen 4
Ishavskatedralen 002

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Ishavskatetralen: The Cathedral". Tromsdalen Kirke. Archived from the original on 7 December 2012. Retrieved 2012-12-11.
  2. ^ a b c d Arkitektguide Nord-Norge og Svalbard. "Tromsdalen kirke".
  3. ^ a b c d Visit Tromsø. "Ishavskatedralen". Archived from the original on 2013-02-23.
  4. ^ "Tromsdalen kirke, Ishavskatedralen". Kirkesøk: Kirkebyggdatabasen. Retrieved 2018-07-20.
  5. ^ "Oversikt over Nåværende Kirker" (in Norwegian). KirkeKonsulenten.no. Retrieved 2018-07-20.

External links

1965 in architecture

The year 1965 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

Aas-Jakobsen

Dr. ing. A. Aas-Jakobsen AS, trading as Aas-Jakobsen, is a civil engineering consultant company specializing in structural engineering. The company is based in Oslo, Norway, and primarily works with bridges, roads, railways, offshore oil and buildings. The company has 250 employees. The company was established by Andreas Aas-Jakobsen in 1937. For the first decade, the company specialized in shell structures, but from the 1950s, the company shifted to bridge design. The company later started designing offshore installations and became a verifier for such structures, and later also became a consultant for railway projects and major road projects, such as the Bjørvika Tunnel through Oslo.Major projects which the company has participated in include the Arctic Cathedral, Askøy Bridge, Bømla Bridge, Brønnøysund Bridge, Candaba Viaduct, Djupfjordstraumen Bridge, Drammen Bridge, Grenland Bridge, Heidrun, Helgeland Bridge, Henningsvær Bridge, Lysefjord Bridge, Mjøsa Bridge, Nordhordland Bridge, Osterøy Bridge, Rama III Bride, Sleipner A, Stord Bridge, Tromsø Bridge and Varodden Bridge. New design for yet unbuilt projects include the Storfjord Bridge, which would, if it was completed, become the longest spanned suspension bridge in the world, spanning 2,300 meters (7,500 ft) across Storfjorden. The company is also part of the team which will design Terminal 2 of Oslo Airport, Gardermoen, and an 8-kilometer (5.0 mi) long bicycle tube in Bodø, which would allow bicyclists to ride during winter without exposure to the elements.

Cathedral

A cathedral is a Christian church which contains the cathedra (Latin for "seat") of a bishop, thus serving as the central church of a diocese, conference, or episcopate. The equivalent word in German for such a church is Dom (from the Latin term domus ecclesiae or domus episcopalis); see also Duomo in Italian, Dom(kerk) in Dutch, and cognates in many other European languages. Churches with the function of "cathedral" are usually specific to those Christian denominations with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Catholic, Anglican, Orthodox, and some Lutheran and Methodist churches. Church buildings embodying the functions of a cathedral first appeared in Italy, Gaul, Spain and North Africa in the 4th century, but cathedrals did not become universal within the Western Catholic Church until the 12th century, by which time they had developed architectural forms, institutional structures and legal identities distinct from parish churches, monastic churches and episcopal residences.

In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the English word "cathedral" commonly translates as katholikon (sobor in Slavic languages), meaning "assembly", but this title is also applied to monastic and other major churches without episcopal responsibilities. When the church at which an archbishop or "metropolitan" presides is specifically intended, the term kathedrikós naós (literally: "cathedral temple") is used.

Following the Protestant Reformation, the Christian church in several parts of Western Europe, such as Scotland, the Netherlands, certain Swiss Cantons and parts of Germany, adopted a Presbyterian polity that did away with bishops altogether. Where ancient cathedral buildings in these lands are still in use for congregational worship, they generally retain the title and dignity of "cathedral", maintaining and developing distinct cathedral functions, but void of hierarchical supremacy. From the 16th century onwards, but especially since the 19th century, churches originating in Western Europe have undertaken vigorous programmes of missionary activity, leading to the founding of large numbers of new dioceses with associated cathedral establishments of varying forms in Asia, Africa, Australasia, Oceania and the Americas. In addition, both the Catholic Church and Orthodox churches have formed new dioceses within formerly Protestant lands for converts and migrant co-religionists. Consequently, it is not uncommon to find Christians in a single city being served by three or more cathedrals of differing denominations.

In the Catholic tradition, the term "cathedral" correctly applies only to a church that houses the seat of the bishop of a diocese. The abbey church of a territorial abbacy serves the same function (that is, houses the seat of the abbot), but does not acquire the title. In any other jurisdiction canonically equivalent to a diocese but not canonically erected as such (prelature, vicariate, ordinariate, prefecture, apostolic administration), the church which serves this function is correctly called the "principal church" of the respective entity—though some have coopted the term "cathedral" anyway. The Catholic Church also uses the following terms.

A pro-cathedral is a parish or other church used temporarily as a cathedral, usually while the cathedral of a diocese is under construction, renovation, or repair. This designation applies only as long as the temporary use continues.

A co-cathedral is a second cathedral in a diocese that has two sees. This situation can arise in various ways such as a merger of two former dioceses, preparation to split a diocese, or perceived need to perform cathedral functions in a second location due to the expanse of the diocesan territory.

A proto-cathedral is the former cathedral of a transferred see.The cathedral church of a metropolitan bishop is called a metropolitan cathedral.

The term "cathedral" actually carries no implication as to the size or ornateness of the building. Nevertheless, most cathedrals are particularly impressive edifices. Thus, the term "cathedral" is often applied colloquially to any large and impressive church, regardless of whether it functions as a cathedral, such as the Crystal Cathedral in California or the Arctic Cathedral in Tromsø, Norway. Although the builders of Crystal Cathedral never intended the building to be a true cathedral, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange purchased the building and the surrounding campus in February 2012 for use as a new cathedral church. The building is now under renovation and restoration for solemn dedication under the title "Christ Cathedral" in 2019.

Grønnåsen Church

Grønnåsen Church (Norwegian: Grønnåsen kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the Breivika area in the northern part of the city of Tromsø on the island of Tromsøya. It is the church for the Grønnåsen parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The gray, wooden church was built in a fan-shaped style in 1996 by the architects E. Hallset and K. Ragnarsdottir. The church seats about 450 people.

Ingrid Espelid Hovig

Ingrid Espelid Hovig (3 June 1924 – 3 August 2018) was a Norwegian television chef and author of cook books. Through appearances on her cooking show Fjernsynskjøkkenet over 26 years, between 1970 and 1996, she came to be considered the "culinary mother" of Norway, with the comparison "the Julia Child of Norway" often applied.

Jan Inge Hovig

Jan Inge Hovig (11 May 1920 – 4 July 1977) was a Norwegian architect.Hovig was born at Verran in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway. He was the son of Johannes Sigurd Hovig (1895-1953) and Gudlaug Pauline Taugstad (1900-1969). Hovig finished his studies at the Norwegian Institute of Technology in 1946. He was city architect during the reconstruction of Narvik 1947-1950. Narvik had been devastated in battle during 1940 as part of the Norwegian Campaign of the German invasion of Norway. In 1950 he moved to Oslo and founded his own office. In 1956 Hovig entered into a partnership with Christian Norberg-Schulz. From 1972 Hovig entered into a partnership with Helge B. Kvernes in Porsgrunn.Hovig represented Norway at the Architecture Exhibition during the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. Hovig's most notable work is the Arctic Cathedral (Tromsøysund kirke), which was drafted in 1960 and completed in 1965. The church is part of the Tromsøysund parish in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. It is now probably the city's most famous building.Jan Inge Hovig married Norwegian television chef and author Ingrid Espelid Hovig in June 1977. Just one week after the wedding ceremony, he died of myocardial infarction. He was buried at Vestre gravlund in Oslo.

Jøvik Chapel

Jøvik Chapel (Norwegian: Jøvik kapell) is a chapel of the Church of Norway in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Jøvik, along the Kjosen fjord, an arm off the main Ullsfjorden.. It is an annex chapel for the Ullsfjord parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden chapel was built in a long church style in 1920. The church seats about 100 people.

Karlsøy Church

Karlsøy Church (Norwegian: Karlsøy kirke) is a historic parish church of the Church of Norway in Karlsøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located on the island of Karlsøya. It is the former main church for the Karlsøy parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The church is no longer in regular use, since it is on a remote island that is now sparsely populated. The church holds special services occasionally including one summer service each year.

Kroken Church

Kroken Church (Norwegian: Kroken kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located the Kroken borough in the city of Tromsø. It is the church for the Kroken parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The brown, brick church was built in a fan-shaped style in 2006 by the architect Nikolai Alfsen. The church seats about 600 people.

Kvaløy Church

Kvaløy Church (Norwegian: Kvaløy kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Kaldfjord on the island of Kvaløya. It is the church for the Kvaløy parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden church was built in a cruciform style in 1962 by the architect Gunnar B. Haugen. The church seats about 260 people.

Lakselvbukt Church

Lakselvbukt Church (Norwegian: Lakselvbukt kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Lakselvbukt on the southeastern shore of the inner Ullsfjorden. It is an annex church for the Ullsfjord parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The blue and red, wooden church was built in a long church style in 1983 by the architect Harry Gangvik. The church seats about 250 people.

List of churches in Troms

This list of churches in Troms is a list of the Church of Norway churches in Troms county, Norway. The churches are all part of the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland along with the churches in Finnmark county. The diocese is based at the Tromsø Cathedral in the city of Tromsø.

The list is divided into five sections, one for each deanery (prosti) in the diocese. Each prosti is led by a provost (prost). Administratively within each deanery, the churches are divided by municipalities which have their own church council (fellesråd). Each municipal church council may be made up of one or more parishes (sokn), each of which may have their own council (soknerådet). Each parish may have one or more congregations in it.

Polaria

Polaria is the world's most northerly aquarium. It is located in Tromsø, in northern Norway.

Rather than a mainly scientific aquarium such as the one in Bergen in the Norwegian midlands, Polaria, which opened in May 1998, is designed to be an educational experience, with particular emphasis on displays for children.

Most of the displays focus on the northerly islands of Svalbard. There is a five-screen panoramic cinema, an "Arctic Walkway" area containing displays of polar exploration equipment, stuffed animals and simulated permafrost, many conventional aquaria displaying local marine life as well as open tanks and display tanks containing rock-shore animals, baby fish and other child-friendly exhibits. Its centerpiece is an open pool containing a group of bearded seals, Erignathus barbatus. These are trained and there are regular displays, as much to keep the animals active and healthy as for public entertainment. The seal enclosure has observation blisters set into its sides, so that visitors can look up at the animals from underneath, and a submerged walkway in a transparent tunnel across the bottom, allowing close access to the animals in their natural environment.

The building itself is also worthy of note. Its striking design represents ice floes that have been pressed up on land by the rough seas of the Arctic. This attractive piece of modern architecture echoes the Arctic Cathedral across the harbour in Tromsdalen on the mainland.

One of Norway's most famous and successful seal hunting ships, the Polstjerna (T-80-T) has been preserved in a separate museum building less than a hundred metres away from Polaria. Tickets to the ship museum can be bought from Polaria.

Ringvassøy Church

Ringvassøy Church (Norwegian: Ringvassøy kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Karlsøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Hansnes on the island of Ringvassøya. It is the main church for the Karlsøy parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland.

Sengskroken Church

Sengskroken Church (Norwegian: Sengskroken kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Karlsøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located on the western coast of the island of Vanna (also known as Vannøya). It is an annex church for the Karlsøy parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden church (originally it was a "chapel") was built in a long church style in 1962 by the architect Knut P. Bugge. The church seats about 225 people. The chapel was consecrated on 2 September 1962 by the Bishop Monrad Norderval. In 2009, the classification of the chapel was upgraded to "church" status.

Tromsdalen

Tromsdalen (Northern Sami: Romssavággi or Sálašvággi) is an urban neighborhood in the city of Tromsø which is in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located just to the east of the city centre on the mainland along the coast of the Tromsøysundet strait. The 5.01-square-kilometre (1,240-acre) urban area has a population (2017) of 16,787 which gives it a population density of 3,351 inhabitants per square kilometre (8,680/sq mi).

The urban area encompasses a good portion of the valley in which it is located. Tromsdalen, which literally means Troms valley, is connected to the island of Tromsøya by the Tromsø Bridge. The European route E8 highway runs through the northern part of Tromsdalen. The Tromsdalselva river flows through the valley. The Arctic Cathedral is located here.

Popular attractions in Tromsdalen are the Arctic Cathedral and the Fjellheisen aerial tramway to the top of a nearby fell; the tramway ends at an elevation of 420 metres (1,380 ft) where the view is stunning. The mountain Tromsdalstinden is located at the eastern end of Tromsdalen and reaches an elevation of 1,238 metres (4,062 ft). The climb to the top of this mountain is very popular with the Tromsø residents, since mountain climbing equipment is not needed.

Tromsø

Tromsø (Norwegian pronunciation: [²trʊmsœ] (listen); Northern Sami: Romsa; Finnish: Tromssa; Kven: Tromssa) is a municipality in Troms county, Norway. The administrative centre of the municipality is the city of Tromsø. Outside Norway, Tromso and Tromsö are alternative spellings of the name.

Tromsø lies in Northern Norway. The 2,521-square-kilometre (973 sq mi) municipality is the 18th largest by area out of the 422 municipalities in Norway. Tromsø is the 9th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 75,638. The municipality's population density is 30.6 inhabitants per square kilometre (79/sq mi) and its population has increased by 15.9% over the last decade. It is the largest urban area in Northern Norway and the third largest north of the Arctic Circle anywhere in the world (following Murmansk and Norilsk). Most of Tromsø, including the city centre, is located on the island of Tromsøya, 350 kilometres (217 mi) north of the Arctic Circle. In 2017, the city of Tromsø had a population of about 65,000 people spread out over Tromsøya and parts of Kvaløya and the mainland. Tromsøya is connected to the mainland by the Tromsø Bridge and the Tromsøysund Tunnel, and to the island of Kvaløya by the Sandnessund Bridge.

The municipality is warmer than most other places located on the same latitude, due to the warming effect of the Gulf Stream. Tromsø is even milder than places much farther south of it elsewhere in the world, such as on the Hudson Bay and in Far East Russia, with the warm-water current allowing for both relatively mild winters and tree growth in spite of its very high latitude.

The city centre of Tromsø contains the highest number of old wooden houses in Northern Norway, the oldest house dating from 1789. The city is a cultural centre for its region, with several festivals taking place in the summer. Torbjørn Brundtland and Svein Berge of the electronica duo Röyksopp and Lene Marlin grew up and started their careers in Tromsø. Noted electronic musician Geir Jenssen also hails from Tromsø.

Tromsø Cathedral

Tromsø Cathedral (Norwegian: Tromsø domkirke) is a cathedral of the Church of Norway located in the city of Tromsø in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. The cathedral is the church for the Tromsø Domkirkens parish and it is the headquarters for the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) and the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. This cathedral is notable since it is the only Norwegian cathedral made of wood.The yellow, wooden cathedral was built in a long church format and in the Gothic Revival style in 1861 by the architect Christian Heinrich Grosch. The church tower and main entrance are on the west front. It is probably the northernmost Protestant cathedral in the world. With over 600 seats, it is one of Norway's biggest wooden churches. It originally held about 984 seats, but many benches and seats have been removed over the years to make room for tables in the back of the church.

Ullsfjord Church

Ullsfjord Church (Norwegian: Ullsfjord kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Sjursnes on the eastern shore of the Ullsfjorden. It is the main church for the Ullsfjord parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden church was built in a long church style in 1862 by the architect Christian Heinrich Grosch. The church seats about 300 people.

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