Arctic–Alpine Botanic Garden

The Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden (Arktisk alpin Botanisk hage) is the world's northernmost botanic garden. It is located in Tromsø, Norway, and is run by the Tromsø University Museum. It opened in 1994, and is open from late May to early October. The garden displays Arctic and alpine plants from all over the northern hemisphere. Entrance is free of charge.[1]

The garden is located to the southeast of the University of Tromsø Campus, commanding a view of the mountains to the east and south. The location, corresponding to the north coast of Alaska, invites thought of an extreme Arctic climate. However, a branch of the Gulf Stream sweeping up the coast of North Norway provides a moderating influence, and the climate of Tromsø is one of relatively mild winters (January average −4.4 °C (24.1 °F)) and cool summers (July average 11.7 °C (53.1 °F)).[1]

From May 15 until July 27, the sun is continuously above the horizon in Tromsø. The two months of midnight sun provide some compensation to the plants for the short growing season and the low temperatures. In the months of May, June and July the theoretically possible number of hours of sunshine is 623, 720 and 695, respectively. The average hours of actual sunshine is about 200 for each of these months. From November 21 until January 17 the sun never rises. Snow generally covers the ground from October or November on, and will accumulate until the beginning of April. Snow then gradually melts and the ground will usually be bare around mid May at sea level, while lingering on far into the summer at higher altitudes. The season in the Botanic Garden is usually from end of May until mid October.[1]

Special Collections: Rhododendron (e.g. R. Lapponicum), Meconopsis, Aster, Polemonium, Erigeron, Codonopsis, Rose Cultivars, Allium, Saxifraga, Silene, Tellima, Heu

Coordinates: 69°40′36″N 18°58′35″E / 69.6768°N 18.9763°E

Botanicgardentromso
Arctic-alpine Botanic Garden, the valley Tromsdalen and the mountain Tromsdalstind can be seen in the background.

References

  1. ^ a b c "Tromsø Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden". The Arctic University of Norway. Retrieved 2014-10-12.

External links

List of botanical gardens

A botanical garden is a place where plants, especially ferns, conifers and flowering plants, are grown and displayed for the purposes of research, conservation, and education. This distinguishes them from parks and pleasure gardens where plants, usually with showy flowers, are grown for public amenity only. Botanical gardens that specialize in trees are sometimes referred to as arboretums. They are occasionally associated with zoos.

The earliest botanical gardens were founded in the late Renaissance at the University of Pisa (1543) and the University of Padua (1545) in Italy, for the study and teaching of medical botany. Many Universities today have botanical gardens for student teaching and academic research, e.g. the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard University, USA, the Bonn University Botanic Garden, Bonn, Germany, the Cambridge University Botanic Garden, Cambridge, England, the Hortus Botanicus, Leiden, Netherlands, and the Kraus Preserve of Ohio Wesleyan University, USA.

This page lists important botanical gardens throughout the world.

A useful database cataloging the world's botanic gardens can also be found at the Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI) website. With over 800 participating botanical gardens, BGCI forms the world's largest network for plant conservation and environmental education.

List of museums in Norway

This is a list of museums in Norway.

Tromsø

Tromsø (Norwegian pronunciation: [²trʊmsœ] (listen); Northern Sami: Romsa; Finnish: Tromssa; Kven: Tromssa) is a municipality in Troms county, Norway. The administrative centre of the municipality is the city of Tromsø. Outside Norway, Tromso and Tromsö are alternative spellings of the name.

Tromsø lies in Northern Norway. The 2,521-square-kilometre (973 sq mi) municipality is the 18th largest by area out of the 422 municipalities in Norway. Tromsø is the 9th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 75,638. The municipality's population density is 30.6 inhabitants per square kilometre (79/sq mi) and its population has increased by 15.9% over the last decade. It is the largest urban area in Northern Norway and the third largest north of the Arctic Circle anywhere in the world (following Murmansk and Norilsk). Most of Tromsø, including the city centre, is located on the island of Tromsøya, 350 kilometres (217 mi) north of the Arctic Circle. In 2017, the city of Tromsø had a population of about 65,000 people spread out over Tromsøya and parts of Kvaløya and the mainland. Tromsøya is connected to the mainland by the Tromsø Bridge and the Tromsøysund Tunnel, and to the island of Kvaløya by the Sandnessund Bridge.

The municipality is warmer than most other places located on the same latitude, due to the warming effect of the Gulf Stream. Tromsø is even milder than places much farther south of it elsewhere in the world, such as on the Hudson Bay and in Far East Russia, with the warm-water current allowing for both relatively mild winters and tree growth in spite of its very high latitude.

The city centre of Tromsø contains the highest number of old wooden houses in Northern Norway, the oldest house dating from 1789. The city is a cultural centre for its region, with several festivals taking place in the summer. Torbjørn Brundtland and Svein Berge of the electronica duo Röyksopp and Lene Marlin grew up and started their careers in Tromsø. Noted electronic musician Geir Jenssen also hails from Tromsø.

Tromsø (city)

Tromsø (Norwegian pronunciation: [²trʊmsœ] (listen); Northern Sami: Romsa; Finnish: Tromssa; Kven: Tromssa) is a city in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. The city is the administrative centre of the municipality as well as the administrative centre of Troms county. The Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland is and its Bishop are based at the Tromsø Cathedral in the city. The city is located on the island of Tromsøya which sits in the Tromsøysundet strait, just off the mainland of Northern Norway. The mainland suburb of Tromsdalen is connected to the city centre on Tromsøya by the Tromsø Bridge and the Tromsøysund Tunnel. The suburb of Kvaløysletta on the island of Kvaløya is connected to the city centre by the Sandnessund Bridge.

The 21.25-square-kilometre (5,250-acre) town has a population (2017) of 64,448 which gives the town a population density of 3,033 inhabitants per square kilometre (7,860/sq mi). The city centre (on Tromsøya) has a population of 38,980. The mainland borough of the city, Tromsdalen, has a population of 16,787 and the suburb of Kvaløysletta on the island of Kvaløya has a population of 8,681. The most populous town north of Tromsø in Norway is Alta, with a population of 15,094 (2017), making Tromsø a very large city for this vast rural northern part of Norway. It is the largest urban area in Northern Norway and the third largest north of the Arctic Circle anywhere in the world (following Murmansk and Norilsk).

The city's largest workplaces are the University of Tromsø (UiT) and University Hospital of North Norway. The Norwegian Polar Institute also has its headquarters in Tromsø. The Northern Lights Observatory was established in 1928, and two companies affiliated with the Kongsberg Gruppen collect satellite data from space using the observatory. The fishing industry is very important. Norway's Norges Råfisklag and Norges sjømatråd (seafood council) both have their headquarters in Tromsø. Sparebanken Nord-Norge also has its headquarters in the city. Furthermore, "Skatt nord", an agency of the Norwegian Tax Administration is based here too.

The city is warmer than most other places located on the same latitude, due to the warming effect of the Gulf Stream. Tromsø is even milder than places much farther south of it elsewhere in the world, such as on the Hudson Bay and in Far East Russia, with the warm-water current allowing for both relatively mild winters and tree growth in spite of its very high latitude.

The city centre of Tromsø contains the highest number of old wooden houses in Northern Norway, the oldest house dating from 1789. The city is a cultural centre for its region, with several festivals taking place in the summer. Torbjørn Brundtland and Svein Berge of the electronica duo Röyksopp and Lene Marlin grew up and started their careers in Tromsø. Noted electronic musician Geir Jenssen also hails from Tromsø.

Tromsø University Museum

Tromsø University Museum is the oldest scientific institution in Northern-Norway. It was established in 1872 and incorporated in the University of Tromsø in 1976. The museum has 80,000-90,000 visitors annually.

The museum consists of six departments

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.