Archie Griffin

Archie Mason Griffin (born August 21, 1954) is a former American football running back. Griffin played seven seasons in the NFL with the Cincinnati Bengals. He is college football's only two-time Heisman Trophy winner. Griffin won four Big Ten Conference titles with the Ohio State Buckeyes and was the first player ever to start in four Rose Bowls.

Archie Griffin
refer to caption
Griffin in 2007
No. 45
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:August 21, 1954 (age 64)
Columbus, Ohio
Height:5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Weight:189 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:Columbus (OH) Eastmoor
College:Ohio State
NFL Draft:1976 / Round: 1 / Pick: 24
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing yards:2,808
Yards per carry:4.1
Rushing touchdowns:7
Player stats at NFL.com

High school career

Griffin rushed for 1,787 yards and scored over 170 points in 11 games, including 29 touchdowns, as a senior fullback at Eastmoor High School (now Eastmoor Academy) in Columbus, Ohio. That year, he led Eastmoor to the Columbus City League championship, rushing for 267 yards on 31 carries in the title game against Linden-McKinley High School. In his junior year, Griffin also rushed for over 1,000 yards.[1]

In 1996 Griffin was inducted into the high school hall of fame. Eastmoor Academy renamed their playing field "Archie Griffin Field" in his honor.[2]

College career

Griffin played for the Ohio State University Buckeyes from 1972-75. When he won a starting position his freshman year, many sophomores were disappointed because Griffin took their spot. Former Ohio State head coach Woody Hayes said of Griffin, "He's a better young man than he is a football player, and he's the best football player I've ever seen."[3]

In 1972, Griffin was a T-formation halfback, and from 1973 through 1975, he was the team's I-formation tailback. He led the Buckeyes in rushing as a freshman with 867 yards, but his numbers exploded the following year with the team's conversion to the I-formation. He rushed for 1,428 yards in the regular season as a sophomore, 1,620 as a junior, 1,357 as a senior. Griffin is the only back to lead the Big Ten Conference in rushing for three straight years. Overall, Griffin rushed for 5,589 yards on 924 carries in his four seasons with the Buckeyes (1972–1975), then an NCAA record. He had 6,559 all-purpose yards and scored 26 touchdowns. In their four seasons with Griffin as their starting running back, the Buckeyes posted a record of 40-5-1.[4] Griffin is one of only two players in collegiate football history to start four Rose Bowl games, the other being Brian Cushing.

Griffin introduced himself to OSU fans as a freshman by setting a school single-game rushing record of 239 yards in the second game of the 1972 season, against North Carolina, breaking a team record that had stood for 27 seasons. His only carry in his first game had resulted in a fumble. He broke his own record as a sophomore with 246 rushing yards in a game against the Iowa Hawkeyes. Over his four-year collegiate career, Griffin rushed for at least 100 yards in 34 games, including an NCAA record 31 consecutive games.

Career rushing statistics

Year Att Yds Avg TD
1972 159 867 5.5 3
1973 247 1,577 6.4 7
1974 256 1,695 6.6 12
1975 262 1,450 5.5 4
Career[5] 924 5,589 6.0 26

Honors

Griffin finished fifth in the Heisman vote in his sophomore year and won the award as a junior and senior. He has been the only NCAA football player to date to win the award twice, a feat that will be difficult for current players to match.[6] In addition to his two Heisman Trophies, Griffin won many other college awards. He is one of four players to win the Chicago Tribune Silver Football, the Big 10's Most Valuable Player Award, twice (1973–1974).[7] United Press International named him Player of the Year twice (1974–1975), the Walter Camp Foundation named him top player twice (1974–1975), he won the Maxwell Award (1975), and Sporting News named him Man of the Year (1975). Griffin is also one of two players in NCAA history to start in four Rose Bowl games in a single career.

The College Football Hall of Fame enshrined Griffin in 1986. Ohio State enshrined him in their own Varsity O Hall of Fame in 1981 and officially retired his number, 45, in 1999. He was inducted into the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 1990. In 2007, he was ranked No. 21 on ESPN's Top 25 Players In College Football History list. On January 1, 2014, Griffin was named the All-Century Player of the Rose Bowl Game during the celebration of the 100th Rose Bowl Game and participated in the Rose Parade.

Professional football career

In the 1976 NFL Draft, he was the first-round draft choice of the Cincinnati Bengals, selected as the 24th overall pick in the draft. Griffin played 7 seasons in the NFL, all with the Bengals (1976–1982). He was joined in the backfield with his college fullback teammate Pete Johnson, who was drafted by the Bengals in 1977, and his brother, Ohio State defensive back Ray Griffin, who was drafted by the team in 1978. During his 7 NFL seasons, he rushed for 2808 yards and 7 touchdowns, and caught 192 passes for 1607 yards and 6 touchdowns. Griffin played in Super Bowl XVI with the Bengals after the 1981 season. However, Griffin struggled throughout his professional career, rushing for 100 yards or more in only three games and failing to record a 700-yard season.[8]

After his career with the Bengals ended, Griffin played briefly with the Jacksonville Bulls of the United States Football League.

Career after football

Griffin is the former President and CEO of The Ohio State University Alumni Association. He is also the current spokesman for the Wendy's High School Heisman award program. Formerly, he served as Assistant Athletic Director for The Ohio State University and still speaks to the football team before every game.

Griffin also serves on the Board of Directors for Motorists Insurance which has offices in downtown Columbus, Abercrombie and Fitch, and the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame, based in Irving, Texas.

Along with former NBA basketball star Magic Johnson, Griffin was one of the investors in Mandalay Baseball Properties LLC which owned the Dayton Dragons, a class single-A minor league baseball team affiliated with Major League Baseball's Cincinnati Reds, prior to the sale of the team in 2014 to Palisades Arcadia Baseball LLC.[9][10][11]

Family

Griffin is a son of Margaret and James Griffin. He has six brothers and a sister. His brothers are named Jimmy, Larry, Daryle, Duncan, Raymond (former NFL cornerback who for a time was a teammate with the Bengals), and Keith who also played in the NFL.

Griffin's son Andre is currently entering his third year as the head coach at Lima Senior High School. Griffin's son Adam played as a defensive back for the Ohio State football team for three seasons until a shoulder injury ended his football career.[12] Griffin also has three grandsons Kamron, Diante, and Adrien.

See also

References

  1. ^ "National High School Hall of Fame: Archie Griffin". Archived from the original on September 6, 2006.
  2. ^ "Legends of HS Football: Archie Griffin". Archived from the original on March 20, 2006.
  3. ^ Hackenberg, Dave (May 16, 2001). "Griffin singing praise for Buckeyes' Tressel". Toledo Blade. Retrieved January 13, 2015.
  4. ^ "Archie Griffin: Associate Athletic Director". CSTV.com. Archived from the original on August 14, 2006.
  5. ^ https://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/players/archie-griffin-1.html
  6. ^ Maise, Ivan (December 10, 2014). "Archie Griffin still Heisman standard". ESPN.com. Retrieved December 11, 2014.
  7. ^ "Past Silver Football winners". Chicago Tribune. December 8, 2016. Retrieved October 25, 2017.
  8. ^ "Countdown to the 2013 NFL Draft". National Football League. Retrieved April 2, 2013.
  9. ^ "Single-A team celebrates 815th sellout". ESPN. ESPN.com.
  10. ^ "Report: Deal to sell Dayton Dragons reached". daytondailynews.com.
  11. ^ "Palisades Arcadia to acquire Dayton Dragons". milb.com.
  12. ^ "OhioStateBuckeyes.com Buckeye Biography - #11 Adam Griffin".

External links

1973 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1973 Big Ten Conference football season was the 78th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1973 NCAA Division I football season.

The 1973 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, and the 1973 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bo Schembechler, compiled identical 10–0–1 records and tied for the Big Ten championship. Ohio State was ranked No. 2 in the final AP Poll, and Michigan was ranked No. 6. Ohio State led the conference in both scoring offense (37.5 points per game) and scoring defense (5.8 points allowed per game).

The regular season ended with a 10–10 tie between Michigan and Ohio State. When the game ended in a tie, the Big Ten athletic directors voted, 6–4, to send Ohio State to the Rose Bowl. Michigan athletic officials and fans were outraged, with even the Vice President of the United States, Gerald Ford, speaking out against the decision. Ohio State defeated USC, 42–21, in the 1974 Rose Bowl. Two selectors, the National Championship Foundation and the Poling System, recognize Michigan as a co-national champion for the 1973 season.

The Big Ten statistical leaders in 1973 included Ohio State running back Archie Griffin with 1,577 rushing yards. Griffin also won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the Big Ten's most valuable player. Four Big Ten players were recognized as consensus first-team All-Americans: Randy Gradishar and John Hicks of Ohio State and Dave Gallagher and Dave Brown of Michigan.

1973 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 1973 Ohio State Buckeyes football team represented the Ohio State University in the 1973 Big Ten Conference football season. The Buckeyes compiled a 10–0–1 record, including the 1974 Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, where they won, 42–21, against the USC Trojans.

1974 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1974 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1974 Big Ten Conference football season. The teams selected by the Big Ten coaches for the United Press International (UPI) were led by Ohio State with nine first-team selections. Michigan placed five players on the coaches' All-Big Ten first team. Running back Archie Griffin, who won his first Heisman Trophy in 1974, was the only player unanimously selected by the coaches as a first-team All-Big Ten player.

1974 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1974 Big Ten Conference football season was the 79th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1974 NCAA Division I football season.

The 1974 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bo Schembechler, compiled a 10–1 record, tied for the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring defense (6.8 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 3 in final AP Poll. Cornerback Dave Brown was selected a consensus first-team All-American for the second straight year. Gordon Bell led the team with 1,048 rushing yards and 11 touchdowns. Quarterback Dennis Franklin finished sixth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy.

The 1974 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, compiled a 10–2 record, tied with Michigan for the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (36.4 points per game), and was ranked No. 4 in the final AP Poll. The Buckeyes lost to USC, 18–17, in the 1975 Rose Bowl. Running back Archie Griffin totaled 1,695 rushing yards and won the 1974 Heisman Trophy as the best player in college football. Three Buckeyes, Griffin, Kurt Schumacher, and Steve Myers, were selected as consensus first-team All-Americans.

The 1974 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Denny Stolz, compiled a 7–3–1 record, finished in third place in the Big Ten, and was ranked No. 12 in the final AP Poll. Quarterback Charley Baggett was selected as the team's most valuable player.

1974 College Football All-America Team

The 1974 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1974. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1974 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and Time magazine.Six players were selected unanimously by all five of the official selectors. The six unanimous All-Americans included running backs Archie Griffin of Ohio State (the 1974 Heisman Trophy winner), Joe Washington of Oklahoma, and Anthony Davis of USC. On defense, the unanimous All-Americans were defensive back Dave Brown of Michigan, linebacker Rod Shoate of Oklahoma, and defensive end Randy White of Maryland.

The Ohio State and Oklahoma teams each had eight players who received first-team honors. The Ohio State honorees were Archie Griffin, tight end Doug France, tackle Kurt Schumacher, center Steve Myers, defensive end Van DeCree, defensive tackle Pete Cusick, defensive back Neal Colzie, and punter Tom Skladany. The Oklahoma honorees were Joe Washington, Rod Shoate, receiver Tinker Owens, guard John Roush, center Kyle Davis, defensive tackle Lee Roy Selmon, middle guard Dewey Selmon, and defensive back Randy Hughes.

1975 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1975 Big Ten Conference football season was the 80th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1975 NCAA Division I football season.

The 1975 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, compiled an 11–0 record in the regular season, won the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (32.0 points per game) and scoring defense (8.5 points allowed per game), and lost to UCLA in the 1976 Rose Bowl. Running back Archie Griffin won the 1975 Heisman Trophy, becoming the only two-time Heisman winner. Quarterback Cornelius Greene won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the Big Ten's most valuable player, and Pete Johnson led the conference with 156 points scored. Griffin, defensive back Tim Fox, and offensive guard Ted Smith were consensus first-team All-Americans.

The 1975 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bo Schembechler, compiled an 8–2–2 record, finished in second place in the Big Ten, and lost to Oklahoma in the 1976 Orange Bowl. Gordon Bell gained 1,390 rushing yards and was selected as Michigan's most valuable player and a unanimous first-team All-Big Ten player. Defensive back Don Dufek was selected as a first-team All-American by the American Football Coaches Association, Football Writers Association of America, Football News, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation.

The 1975 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Denny Stolz, compiled a 7–4 record and finished in third place in the Big Ten. Charley Baggett led the team with 1,499 total yards, and Levi Jackson gained 1,063 rushing yards and was selected as the team's most valuable player.

Other conference leaders included Minnesota quarterback Tony Dungy with 1,515 passing yards and 1,759 yards of total offense and Purdue wide receiver Scott Yelvington with 686 receiving yards. Wisconsin offensive tackle Dennis Lick was a consensus first-team All-American.

1975 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 1975 Ohio State Buckeyes football team represented the Ohio State University in the 1975 Big Ten Conference football season. The Buckeyes compiled an 11–1 record, including the 1976 Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, where they lost, 23–10, to the UCLA Bruins.

In 1975, Archie Griffin became college football's only two-time Heisman trophy winner. Griffin won four Big Ten Conference titles with the Ohio State Buckeyes and became the only player ever to start in four Rose Bowls.

1976 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1976 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's ninth year in professional football and its seventh with the National Football League.

Paul Brown had announced his retirement after 41 seasons of coaching and named Bill Johnson, his longtime assistant, as the successor over future San Francisco Head coach Bill Walsh. Brown continued to serve as the club's general manager and vice president. The Bengals acquired defensive end Coy Bacon in a trade with San Diego and drafted halfback Archie Griffin, the two-time Heisman Trophy winner from Ohio State. The Bengals won nine of their first 11 games and finished 10–4, but did not make the playoffs.

1977 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1977 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's tenth year in professional football and its eighth with the National Football League. Second year Running Back Archie Griffin struggled to learn the NFL game rushing for only 549 yards, while failing to cross the end zone. A loss to Houston in the final game cost the Bengals a spot in the playoffs. The team finished with an 8–6 record.

Berwick, Columbus, Ohio

Berwick is a residential neighborhood located on the east side of Columbus, Ohio. Berwick is characterized by its warm nature and welcoming community atmosphere, as well as its diverse population, including significant numbers of African American and Jewish citizens. The median household income is higher than the state average at $51,048, and the average household net worth is $509,793. The median age of residents is 52. Notable Columbus citizens, including Heisman Trophy Winner Archie Griffin and Columbus Mayor Michael B. Coleman, have resided in the area.

Gordon Bell (American football)

Gordon Granville Bell (born December 25, 1953) is a former American football running back, kickoff returner and punt returner who played for the University of Michigan Wolverines from 1973–1975, and professionally for the New York Giants (1976-1977) and St. Louis Cardinals (1978) of the National Football League (NFL).

Bell was a two-time All-Ohio running back in high school and led Ohio's Troy High School to undefeated seasons in 1970 and 1971. As a 16-year-old junior, he rushed for 324 yards in a single game; for the year he had 1,593 yards rushing and scored 146 points. As a senior in 1971, he lost the Ohio AAA high school back of the year award to Archie Griffin.

Bell played tailback for Michigan teams that had a combined record of 28-3-3 from 1973–1975. As a junior in 1974, Bell was a part-time player who started only three of Michigan's eleven games, but he still managed to become only the third player in school history to rush for 1,000 yards in a season. In 1975, he set several single-season school records, including most all-purpose yards (1,714 yards), most 100-yard rushing games (eight), and most rushing attempts (273). At the time of his graduation from Michigan, Bell also ranked second in school history in career rushing yards and third in all-purpose yards. Though Bell's records have been surpassed in more recent years, he remains one of the all-time rushing leaders in Michigan history. Despite his accomplishments, Bell played in the shadow of Big Ten Conference rival, Archie Griffin, who won back-to-back Heisman Trophies. In some respects, Bell exceeded even Griffin's accomplishments, as Bell won the 1975 Big Ten rushing championship.

Bell played three years of professional football, but never made it into the starting lineup for an NFL team. In three NFL seasons, he had 1,444 all-purpose yards. His best NFL season was 1976, when he had 784 all-purpose yards.

Keith Griffin (American football)

Keith B. Griffin (born October 26, 1961) is a former American football running back in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins. He played college football at the University of Miami. Griffin was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated on January 9, 1984 for the story of the Hurricanes' dramatic victory over the #1 Ranked Nebraska Cornhuskers 31-30 in the January 1, 1984 Orange Bowl. The 11-1-0 Hurricanes broke the Cornhuskers' 22-game win streak. Keith is the younger brother to two-time Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griffin.

List of Heisman Trophy winners

The Heisman Trophy, one of the highest individual awards in American college football, has been awarded 81 times since its creation in 1935, including 79 unique winners and one two-time winner. The trophy is given annually to the most outstanding college football player in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and is awarded by the Heisman Trust, successors of the awards from the Downtown Athletic Club at an annual ceremony at the PlayStation Theater in Times Square, Manhattan.

In 1935, the award, then known as the DAC Trophy, was created by New York City's Downtown Athletic Club to recognize the best college football player "east of the Mississippi River". In that inaugural year, the award went to Jay Berwanger from the University of Chicago. Berwanger was later drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League but declined to sign for them. He never played professional football for any team, instead choosing to pursue a career in business. In 1936, the club's athletic director, football pioneer John Heisman, died and the trophy was renamed in his honor. Larry Kelley, the second winner of the award, was the first to win it as the "Heisman Trophy". In addition to the name change, the award also became a nationwide achievement. With the new name, players west of the Mississippi became eligible; the first player from the western United States was selected in 1938. Only one player, Ohio State's Archie Griffin, has won the award twice.On June 10, 2010, following several years of investigation, the NCAA announced that USC running back Reggie Bush, the 2005 Heisman trophy winner, received gifts from agents while still in college. The university received major sanctions, and there were reports that the Heisman Trophy Trust would strip his award. In September of that year, Bush voluntarily forfeited his title as the 2005 winner. The Heisman Trust decided to leave the award vacated with no new winner to be announced.Between 1936 and 2001, the award was given at an annual gala ceremony at the Downtown Athletic Club in New York City. The Downtown Athletic Club's facilities were damaged during the September 11, 2001 attacks. Due to financial difficulties stemming from the damage, the DAC declared bankruptcy in 2002, turning over its building to creditors. Following the club's bankruptcy and the loss of the original Downtown Athletic Club building, the Yale Club of New York City assumed presenting honors in 2002 and 2003. The ceremony was moved to the New York Marriott Marquis in Times Square for the 2002, 2003, and 2004 presentations, but since 2005, the event has been held at the venue now known as PlayStation Theater, also in Times Square. The move to the PlayStation Theater allowed the Downtown Athletic Club (and ultimately, the award's successor, The Heisman Trust) to resume full control of the event—the most prominent example of which was the return of the official portraits of past winners—despite the loss of the original presentation hall.In terms of balloting, the fifty states of the U.S. are split into six regions (Far West, Mid Atlantic, Mid West, North East, South, South West), and six regional representatives are selected to appoint voters in their states. Each region has 145 media votes, for a total of 870 votes. In addition, all previous Heisman winners may vote, and one final vote is counted through public balloting. The Heisman ballots contain a 3-2-1 point system, in which each ballot ranks the voter's top three players and awards them three points for a first-place daddy vote, two points for a second-place vote, and one point for a third-place vote. The points are tabulated, and the player with the highest total of points across all ballots wins the Heisman Trophy.

Ohio State Buckeyes football yearly statistical leaders

Ohio State Buckeyes football yearly statistical leaders in points scored, rushing yards, passing yards, receptions, and total tackles.

Ohio State Football All-Century Team

The Ohio State Football All-Century Team was chosen in early 2000 by the Touchdown Club of Columbus. It was selected to honor the greatest Ohio State Buckeyes football players of the 20th century. No effort was made to distinguish a first team or second team, the organization instead choosing only to select an 80-man roster and a five-man coaching staff.

Members selected to the team were honored at a banquet on February 19, 2000. Living members of the team elected all-century captains and an all-century Most Valuable Player. As captains they chose Archie Griffin and Rex Kern on offense, and Chris Spielman and Jack Tatum on defense. Archie Griffin was selected as MVP.

Tim Fox (American football)

Timothy Richard "Tim" Fox (born November 1, 1953) is a former American football safety who played for the New England Patriots, San Diego Chargers and the Los Angeles Rams from 1976 to 1986.Fox was born in Canton, Ohio, where he played football at Glenwood High School. He continued to play football while attending Ohio State University, and was a co-captain his senior year along with the only two time Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griffin under the great coach Woody Hayes. He was selected in the 1st round (21st overall) in the 1976 NFL Draft by the Patriots. He was selected to the Pro Bowl in 1981. Fox remained in Foxboro, Massachusetts after he retired in 1987 for 12 years until 1999 when he decided to make Westwood, Massachusetts his new home. Tim currently resides in Hull, Massachusetts and has been there since 2007. Fox has been working for R.R. Donnelley & Sons since 1992 and is currently the Sales Director for the New England region. He has two daughters, Haley and Landin, and one son, Christopher.

In 2016, Fox described himself and his declining cognitive abilities, as "...a living, breathing petri dish for CTE research.”

Touchdown Club of Columbus

The Touchdown Club of Columbus was founded in Columbus, Ohio, in 1956 by Sam B. Nicola at the request of state auditor James A. Rhodes, who later became governor of the state. Nicola served as the club's president until his death in 1993. More than a decade later, his son Sam Nicola Jr. took over the Touchdown Club.

UPI College Football Player of the Year

The United Press International College Football Player of the Year Award was among the first and most recognized college football awards. With the second bankruptcy of UPI in 1991, along with that of its parent company, the award was discontinued. Offensive and defensive players were eligible. Unlike the Heisman, it was never affiliated with a civic organization or named after a player (like the Walter Camp Award). Like all UPI college awards at the time, it was based on the votes of NCAA coaches. Billy Cannon, O.J. Simpson, and Archie Griffin are the only two-time winners.

Walter Camp Award

The Walter Camp Player of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football player of the year, as decided by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I FBS head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation; the award is named for Walter Camp, an important and influential figure in the development of the sport. Three players have won the award twice: Colt McCoy of the University of Texas in 2008 and 2009, Archie Griffin of Ohio State in 1974 and 1975, and O. J. Simpson of USC in 1967 and 1968.

Archie Griffin—awards and honors

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