Apollonis

Apollonis (/ˌæpəˈloʊnəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀπoλλωνίς means "of Apollo")[1] was one of the three younger Mousai Apollonides (Muses) in Greek mythology and daughters of Apollo[2] who were worshipped in Delphi where the Temple of Apollo and the Oracle were located. The three sisters, Cephisso, Apollonis, and Borysthenis, are also known as Nētē, Mesē, and Hypatē[3] where their names are synonymous with those of the lowest, middle, and highest chords of a lyre, further characterizing the Muses as the daughters of Apollo.

Apollonis
Venerated inGreek mythology
Symbollyre
MountDelphi
Personal information
ParentsApollo
SiblingsCephisso and Borysthenis or Nētē, Mesē, and Hypatē
Roman equivalentCamenae

Notes

  1. ^ Theoi Project, Greek Mythology, Mousai Apollonides, Retrieved April 29, 2014
  2. ^ Eumelus fr. 35 as cited from Tzetzes on Hesiod, 23
  3. ^ Plutarch, Symposium 9.14
Aceso

Aceso (Greek: Ἀκεσώ) was the Greek goddess of the healing process.

Apollonieis

Apollonieis (Ancient Greek: Ἀπολλωνιείς) was a deme of ancient Attica, of the phyle of Attalis, sending five delegates to the Athenian Boule. It was established in 200 BCE and named after Apollonis, wife of Attalus I.Its site is unlocated.

Apollonis (Lydia)

Apollonis (Ancient Greek: Ἀπολλωνίς), also known as Apollonia (Ἀπολλωνία), Apollones (Ἀπολλώνης), and Apollonias (Ἀπολλωνίας), was a city in ancient Lydia. It was located south of Apollonia in Mysia, where there is a ridge of hills, after crossing which the road to Sardis had on the left Thyatira, and on the right Apollonis, which was 300 stadia from Pergamum, and the same distance from Sardis. It was named after the queen Apollonis, the mother of Eumenes II and Attalus II of Pergamum, in the place of an older city; possibly Doidye. It was mentioned by Cicero. It was destroyed in 17 CE by the great earthquake that destroyed twelve cities of Asia Minor. Tiberius rebuilt the city. It issued coins; those from Marcus Aurelius to Severus Alexander are extant. Apollonis is a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church.The site of Apollonis is located near Palamut Kalesi, Mecidiye.

Attalus I

Attalus I (Ancient Greek: Ἄτταλος Α΄), surnamed Soter (Greek: Σωτήρ, "Savior"; 269–197 BC) ruled Pergamon, an Ionian Greek polis (what is now Bergama, Turkey), first as dynast, later as king, from 241 BC to 197 BC. He was the first cousin once removed and the adoptive son of Eumenes I, whom he succeeded, and was the first of the Attalid dynasty to assume the title of king in 238 BC. He was the son of Attalus and his wife Antiochis.

Attalus won an important victory over the Galatians, newly arrived Celtic tribes from Thrace, who had been, for more than a generation, plundering and exacting tribute throughout most of Asia Minor without any serious check. This victory, celebrated by the triumphal monument at Pergamon (famous for its Dying Gaul) and the liberation from the Gallic "terror" which it represented, earned for Attalus the name of "Soter", and the title of "king". A courageous and capable general and loyal ally of Rome, he played a significant role in the first and second Macedonian Wars, waged against Philip V of Macedon. He conducted numerous naval operations, harassing Macedonian interests throughout the Aegean, winning honors, collecting spoils, and gaining for Pergamon possession of the Greek islands of Aegina during the first war, and Andros during the second, twice narrowly escaping capture at the hands of Philip.

Attalus was a protector of the Greek cities of Anatolia and viewed himself as the champion of Greeks against barbarians. During his reign he established Pergamon as a considerable power in the Greek East. He died in 197 BC, shortly before the end of the second war, at the age of 72, having suffered an apparent stroke while addressing a Boeotian war council some months before. He and his wife were admired for their rearing of their four sons. He was succeeded as king by his son Eumenes II.

Attalus II Philadelphus

Attalus II Philadelphus (Greek: Ἄτταλος Β΄ ὁ Φιλάδελφος, Attalos II Philadelphos, which means "Attalus the brother-loving"; 220–138 BC) was a King of Pergamon and the founder of modern-day Turkish city Antalya.

Borysthenis

In Greek mythology, Borysthenis (Ancient Greek: Βορυσθενίς) may refer to two distinct individuals:

Borysthenes, one of the three Muses that were daughters of Apollo. Her sisters were Apollonis and Cephisso.

Borysthenis, daughter of Borysthenes, god of the Dneper River in Scythia (modern Ukraine) who mothered Targitaus by Zeus.

Cephisso

In Greek mythology, Cephisso or Kephiso (Ancient Greek: Κηφισώ) was one of the three Muses that were daughters of Apollo. Her sisters were Apollonis and Borysthenis.

Edfu

Edfu (Egyptian Arabic: إدفو‎ pronounced [ˈʔedfu], Coptic: Ⲧⲃⲱ vars. Ⲁⲧⲃⲱ, Ⲧⲃⲟ (Sahidic); Ⲑⲃⲱ(Bohairic); also spelt Idfu, or in modern French as Edfou, and known in antiquity as Behdet) is an Egyptian city, located on the west bank of the Nile River between Esna and Aswan, with a population of approximately sixty thousand people. For the ancient history of the city, see below. Edfu is the site of the Ptolemaic Temple of Horus and an ancient settlement, Tell Edfu (described below). About 5 km (3.1 mi) north of Edfu are remains of ancient pyramids.

Erebus

In Greek mythology, Erebus , also Erebos (Ancient Greek: Ἔρεβος, Érebos, "deep darkness, shadow" or "covered"), was often conceived as a primordial deity, representing the personification of darkness; for instance, Hesiod's Theogony identifies him as one of the first five beings in existence, born of Chaos.

Eumenes II

Eumenes II (; Greek: Εὐμένης Βʹ; ruled 197–159 BC) surnamed Soter meaning "Savior" was a ruler of Pergamon, and a son of Attalus I Soter and queen Apollonis and a member of the Attalid dynasty of Pergamon.

Hermocapelia

Hermocapelia was an ancient Roman and Byzantine era city on the Hermus River, in the provence of Lydia.It is described as to the west of Apollonis in its own little plain almost completely surrounded by mountains.It was mentioned by Pliny but is best known for its coins which it minted, and which are in existence today.

The city was the site of an ancient bishopric which remains a vacant titular see to this day.

Hypate

In Greek mythology, Hypate (Ὑπάτη) was one of the three Muses of the lyre who were worshipped at Delphi, where the Temple of Apollo and the Oracle were located. Her name was also the highest of the seven notes of the lyre. Her sisters who were worshipped along with her were Nete and Mese. These three muses were comparable to the original three, Aoide, Melete, and Mneme. Alternatively, they were Cephisso, Apollonis, and Borysthenis, which portrayed them as the daughters of Apollo.

José de Jesús Pimiento Rodríguez

José de Jesús Horacio Pimiento Rodríguez (born February 18, 1919) is a Colombian Prelate of the Catholic Church. At the age of 100, he is the oldest living cardinal.

Lyrbe

Lyrbe (spelled Lyrba in the 1910 Catholic Encyclopedia) was a city and episcopal see in the Roman province of Pamphylia Prima and is now a titular see.

Melete

In Greek mythology, Melete (Μελέτη) was one of the three original (Boeotian) muses before the Nine Olympian Muses were founded. Her sisters were Aoide and Mneme. She was the muse of thought and meditation. Melete literally means "ponder" and "contemplation" in Greek.

According to Pausanias in the later 2nd century AD, there were three original Muses: Aoidē ("song" or "voice"), Meletē ("practice" or "occasion"), and Mnēmē ("memory"). Together, these three form the complete picture of the preconditions of poetic art in cult practice. In Delphi three Muses were worshipped as well, but with other names: Nētē, Mesē, and Hypatē, which are the names of the three chords of the ancient musical instrument, the lyre. Alternatively they were called Cēphisso, Apollonis, and Borysthenis, whose names characterise them as daughters of Apollo. In later tradition, four Muses were recognized: Thelxinoē, Aoedē, Archē, and Meletē, said to be daughters of Zeus and Plusia (or of Uranus).

Mese (mythology)

In Greek mythology, Mese (Μέση) was one of the three Muses of the lyre that were worshipped at Delphi, where the Temple of Apollo and the Oracle were located. Her name was also the middle of the seven notes of the lyre. Her sisters that were worshipped along with her were Nete and Hypate. These three muses were comparable to the original three, Aoide, Melete, and Mneme. Alternatively, they were Cephisso, Apollonis, and Borysthenis, which portrayed them as the daughters of Apollo.

Michel Mondésert

Michel Mondésert (5 December 1916 – 16 April 2009) was a French prelate of the Roman Catholic Church.

Mondésert was born in Villefranche-sur-Saône, Rhône, and was ordained a priest on 11 July 1943. Appointed Auxiliary Bishop to the Diocese of Grenoble-Vienne on 4 June 1971 and ordained bishop on 25 September 1971. He would remain bishop of Grenoble-Vienne until his retirement on 11 January 1992.

Mondésert was the Titular bishop of Apollonis from 1971 until his death.

Nesoi

The Nesoi (Greek Nῆσοι "islands"), in ancient Greek religion, were the goddesses of islands. Each island was said to have its own personification. They were classified as one of the Protogenoi, otherwise known as ancient elemental Greek primordial deities. The Nesoi were thought to have been Ourea who were cast under the sea during one of Poseidon's rages.

Nete (mythology)

In Greek mythology, Nete (Νήτη) was one of the three Muses of the lyre that were worshipped at Delphi, where the Temple of Apollo and the Oracle were located. Her name was also the lowest of the seven notes of the lyre. Her sisters that were worshipped along with her were Hypate and Mese. These three muses were comparable to the original three, Aoide, Melete, and Mneme. Alternatively, they were Cephisso, Apollonis, and Borysthenis, which portrayed them as the daughters of Apollo.

Ancient Greek deities by affiliation
Primordial
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