Antonio Langham

Collie Antonio Langham (born July 31, 1972) is an American former college and professional football player who was a cornerback in the National Football League (NFL) for seven seasons. He played college football for the University of Alabama, and was recognized as an All-American. Selected by the Cleveland Browns in the first round of the 1994 NFL Draft, Langham also played professionally for the Baltimore Ravens, San Francisco 49ers, and New England Patriots of the NFL.

Antonio Langham
No. 38, 43
Position:Cornerback
Personal information
Born:July 31, 1972 (age 46)
Town Creek, Alabama
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:181 lb (82 kg)
Career information
High school:Hazlewood
(Town Creek, Alabama)
College:Alabama
NFL Draft:1994 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:102
Games started:76
Tackles:345
Interceptions:14
Quarterback sacks:1
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Langham was born in Town Creek, Alabama. He graduated from Hazlewood High School in Town Creek.

College career

Langham attended the University of Alabama, where he played for the Alabama Crimson Tide football team as a defensive back from 1990 to 1993. On the eventual 1992 national championship team Langham, in his sophomore year, he returned an interception for a touchdown late in the 4th quarter of the 1992 SEC Championship Game. As a junior in 1993, he was recognized as a consensus first-team All-American and would win the Jim Thorpe Award as the nation's top defensive back. Later, however, he caused the Crimson Tide to forfeit most of its 1993 season and suffer NCAA sanctions by signing with an agent during the previous offseason. Langham also signed and submitted an application to enter the 1993 NFL Draft, rendering him ineligible under NCAA rules, regardless of whether he had signed with an agent or not. The Crimson Tide's head coach, Gene Stallings, failed to inform both the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) of Langham's draft application, or to declare Langham ineligible as required by NCAA rules. His ineligibility was revealed in late November 1993 and the University of Alabama eventually had to forfeit eight wins and a tie from the 1993 season.[1]

He still holds the Crimson Tide's team record for career interceptions with 19.[2]

Professional career

The Cleveland Browns selected Langham in the first round (ninth pick overall) of the 1994 NFL Draft, and he played for the Browns during the 1994 and 1995 seasons. He is one of only two players to have played for the Cleveland Browns before they became the Baltimore Ravens and return to the Browns after the expansion team formed in 1999; the other player is Orlando Brown. His best year as a pro came during the 1996 season as a member of the Baltimore Ravens when he intercepted 5 passes for 59 yards.

NFL statistics

Year Team Games Combined Tackles Tackles Assisted Tackles Sacks Forced Fumbles Fumble Recoveries Fumble Return Yards Interceptions Interception Return Yards Yards per Interception Returns Longest Interception Return Interceptions Returned for Touchdown Passes Defended
1994 CLE 16 60 54 6 0.0 1 0 0 2 2 1 2 0 27
1995 CLE 16 74 66 8 0.0 0 0 0 2 29 15 29 0 12
1996 BAL 15 52 47 5 0.0 1 0 0 5 59 12 28 0 20
1997 BAL 16 59 53 6 1.0 0 0 0 3 40 13 40 1 13
1998 SF 11 33 33 0 0.0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 8
1999 CLE 13 26 24 2 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2000 NE 15 40 35 5 0.0 0 0 0 1 24 24 24 0 4
Career 102 344 312 32 1.0 3 0 0 14 154 11 40 1 85

[3]

Personal info

Langham is a cousin of former NFL players Kerry Goode and Chris Goode.[4]

References

  1. ^ "NCAA Public Report on Infractions at Alabama". Retrieved December 11, 2006.
  2. ^ http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/alab/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/record-book.pdf
  3. ^ "Antonio Langham Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved May 9, 2014.
  4. ^ Tide football a family tradition http://www.decaturdaily.com/detail/49870.html?print=1
1992 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1992 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1992 NCAA Division I-A football season. This was the team's third season under head coach Gene Stallings. They played their home games at both Bryant–Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished the season undefeated with a record of 13–0 (8–0 in the SEC) and as National Champions. The team was noted especially for its strong defense, which led the nation in fewest points allowed (9.2 per game during the regular season) and, in a strong bowl game performance, prevented defending national champion Miami from scoring an offensive touchdown.

The 1992 Crimson Tide won their twentieth Southeastern Conference title by defeating the Florida Gators 28–21 on December 5 in the inaugural SEC Championship Game. The team then capped off Alabama's eighth perfect season by winning the 1992 national football championship, defeating the heavily favored Miami Hurricanes 34-13 in the 1993 Sugar Bowl on January 1, 1993, a matchup resulting from the first ever Bowl Coalition national championship game.

The Alabama Crimson Tide celebrated 100 years of Alabama Football in the 1992 season.

1992 All-SEC football team

The 1992 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1992 college football season.

The Alabama Crimson Tide won the conference, beating the Florida Gators 28 to 21 in the inaugural SEC Championship game. The Crimson Tide then won a national championship, defeating the Miami Hurricanes 34 to 13 in the Sugar Bowl.

Georgia running back Garrison Hearst was voted SEC Player of the Year.

1992 NCAA Division I-A football season

The 1992 NCAA Division I-A football season was the first year of the Bowl Coalition and concluded with Alabama's first national championship in thirteen years—their first since the departure of Bear Bryant. One of Bryant's former players, Gene Stallings, was the head coach, and he used a style similar to Bryant's, a smashmouth running game combined with a tough defense.

The members of the Bowl Coalition were the Sugar Bowl, Orange Bowl, Cotton Bowl Classic, and Fiesta Bowl. Under the agreement the Sugar Bowl, Orange Bowl, and Cotton Bowl Classic hosted the Southeastern Conference, Big 8, and Southwest Conference champions, respectively, and then a pool of at large teams was formed between the Atlantic Coast Conference champ, the Big East champ, Notre Dame, and two conference runners-up from the Big 8, SWC, ACC, Big East and Pac-10. The highest ranked host team would play the highest ranked at-large team. If the two highest ranked teams were both at-large teams, the championship game would be hosted by the Fiesta Bowl.

So for this year, (host) SEC champ Alabama played (at-large) Big East Champ Miami-FL, the Orange Bowl featured (host) Big-8 champ Nebraska and (at-large) ACC champ Florida St., the Cotton Bowl Classic featured (host) SWC champ Texas A&M and (at-large) independent Notre Dame, and the Fiesta Bowl featured (at-large) Big East runner up Syracuse and (at-large) Big 8 runner up Colorado.

The 1992 season also saw the expansion of the SEC and the first conference championship game to be played in the country. Before the 1992 season, the Arkansas Razorbacks and the South Carolina Gamecocks joined the SEC, which expanded the conference to twelve teams. The conference then split into two divisions, and the winner of each division would face off in the SEC Championship Game in Birmingham's historic Legion Field (later moved to Atlanta's Georgia Dome, in 1994). In the first year of the new system, Alabama won the SEC West, Florida won the SEC East, and the Tide won the match-up 28-21 on an Antonio Langham interception return for a touchdown in the closing minutes.

In the Sugar Bowl, to decide the national champion, Miami came in a heavy favorite with even heavier swagger. The Tide defense, however, with its eleven-man fronts and zone blitzes, heavily confused Heisman Trophy winner Gino Torretta and Alabama won in a defensive rout, 34-13.

In other circles, the Big West Conference lost two members; Fresno State left for the WAC and Long Beach State stopped sponsoring football, but they also gained a member in Nevada, which made the jump from Division I-AA. Nevada went 5-1 in conference, winning the Big West championship and representing the conference in the 1992 Las Vegas Bowl (formerly the California Bowl held in Fresno, California).

1992 SEC Championship Game

The 1992 SEC Championship Game was played on December 5, 1992, at Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. The Southeastern Conference (SEC) was the first conference in NCAA Division I college football to host a post-season conference championship game, and the 1992 game was the first time the SEC Championship Game was held. The inaugural match-up determined the 1992 SEC football champion. The Alabama Crimson Tide of the University of Alabama, winners of the SEC Western Division, defeated the Florida Gators of the University of Florida, who won the SEC Eastern Division, by a score of 28-21.

Following the game, undefeated Alabama advanced to the Sugar Bowl, where the Crimson Tide defeated the Miami Hurricanes to win the Crimson Tide's 12th national championship. Florida received an invitation to play in the Gator Bowl, where the Gators defeated the North Carolina State Wolfpack.

1993 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1993 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama for the 1993 NCAA Division I-A football season, competing in the Southeastern Conference Western Division. The team was led by head coach Gene Stallings, who was in his fourth season at the position.

Alabama entered the season as the defending national champion, following their victory in the 1993 Sugar Bowl, and ranked #2 in the AP Poll, behind Florida State.Alabama won the first five games of the season, extending their winning streak to 28 games, matching the longest win streak in school history. The streak ended with a 17–17 tie against Tennessee. The unbeaten streak continued to 31 games before Alabama fell to LSU, 17–13.

Alabama finished second in the SEC West in 1993, but played in the SEC Championship Game as Auburn was prohibited from post-season play because of NCAA violations. In the SEC Championship Game, Alabama lost 28–13 to the Florida Gators at Legion Field. Alabama received an invitation to the Gator Bowl versus North Carolina, winning 24–10 and finishing with a 9–3–1 record.

In 1995, the NCAA found Antonio Langham guilty of receiving improper benefits after signing with an agent following the 1992 season, forcing Alabama to forfeit all games in which Langham competed. Officially, Alabama finished the season with a 1–12 record, only winning their bowl game.

1993 All-SEC football team

The 1993 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1993 college football season.

The Florida Gators won the conference, beat the Alabama Crimson Tide 28 to 13 in the SEC Championship game. The Gators then defeated the West Virginia Mountaineers 41 to 7 in the Sugar Bowl.

Tennessee quarterback Heath Shuler was voted SEC Player of the Year.

1993 College Football All-America Team

The 1993 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and publications that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1993. It is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes seven selectors as "official" for the 1993 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) Football News; (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) The Sporting News; (6) the United Press International (UPI); and (7) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF). Other notable selectors included Gannett News Service (GNS), Scripps Howard (SH), and the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA).Ten players were unanimously selected as first-team All-Americans by all seven of the NCAA-recognized selectors. They are: quarterback Charlie Ward of Florida State; running backs Marshall Faulk of San Diego State and LeShon Johnson of Northern Illinois; wide receiver J. J. Stokes of UCLA; center Jim Pyne of Virginia Tech; offensive tackle Aaron Taylor of Notre Dame; defensive tackle Rob Waldrop of Arizona; linebackers Trev Alberts of Nebraska and Derrick Brooks of Florida State; and defensive back Antonio Langham of Alabama. Charlie Ward also won the 1993 Heisman Trophy.

1993 Gator Bowl

The 1993 Outback Gator Bowl, part of the 1993 bowl game season, took place on December 31, 1993, at the Gator Bowl Stadium in Jacksonville, Florida. The competing teams were the Alabama Crimson Tide, representing the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and the North Carolina Tar Heels, representing the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Alabama won the game 24–10.

1993 LSU Tigers football team

The 1993 LSU Tigers football team represented Louisiana State University in the college football season of 1993. The Tigers played their home games at Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

LSU suffered its worst loss in program history, 58-3 to Florida at home October 9. Following a loss at Kentucky, the Tigers went on a three-game winning streak, including a 17-13 shocker over defending national champion Alabama at Tuscaloosa, ending the Crimson Tide's 31-game unbeaten streak (the NCAA later shortened the streak to 23 when it forced Alabama to forfeit all of its 1993 victories (and a tie vs. Tennessee) due to violations involving All-America defensive back Antonio Langham).

With a bowl berth on the line in the season finale, Arkansas came to Baton Rouge and gouged the Tigers for 412 yards rushing in a 42-24 triumph, leaving LSU with its fifth consecutive losing campaign.

1993 SEC Championship Game

The 1993 SEC Championship Game was won by the Florida Gators 28-13 over the Alabama Crimson Tide. The game was played at Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama, on December 4, 1993, and was televised to a national audience on ABC.

In the 1993 SEC Championship game the Western Division was represented by the Alabama Crimson Tide even though they finished second in the division. The first place Auburn Tigers were on NCAA probation which prohibited them from participating in post season games. Alabama later had their 1993 season affected by the NCAA when in 1995, the NCAA found Antonio Langham guilty of receiving improper benefits after signing with an agent following the 1992 season, forcing Alabama to forfeit all games in which Langham played. Officially, Alabama finished the 1993 season with a 1–12 record, winning only their bowl game.

1993 Vanderbilt Commodores football team

The 1993 Vanderbilt Commodores football team represented Vanderbilt University in the 1993 NCAA Division I-A football season as a member of the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Commodores were led by head coach Gerry DiNardo in his third season and finished with a record of five wins and six losses (5–6 overall, 2–6 in the SEC).

The 500 win milestone mark was finally made by the 1993 Vanderbilt football team. The 500th win was on October 9, 1993 against Cincinnati with a 17–7 win.

In 1995, the NCAA found Antonio Langham guilty of receiving improper benefits after signing with an agent following the 1992 season, forcing Alabama to forfeit all games in which Langham competed. Vanderbilt does not count the forfeit as a win.

1994 Cleveland Browns season

The 1994 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 45th season with the National Football League. It was the only season that the Browns qualified for the playoffs under head coach Bill Belichick. The Browns finished as the NFL's number one defense in terms of points surrendered per game (12.8 points per game). In the playoffs, Belichick got his first playoff victory as a head coach in the AFC Wild Card Game against his eventual current team, the New England Patriots.

1999 Cleveland Browns season

The 1999 Cleveland Browns season was the Browns 51st season overall and 47th in the NFL. It marked the return of professional football to the city of Cleveland, Ohio for the first time since the 1995 season, when the franchise was temporarily deactivated following the Cleveland Browns relocation controversy, which ultimately established the Baltimore Ravens. Officially, the Browns are considered a continuation of the previous franchise, as the history and colors of the team remained in Cleveland. The franchise was still alive as a legal entity between 1996–1998 and its assets kept in a trust managed by the NFL until Al Lerner became the owner in 1998. The Browns, however, in 1999 were treated as a new franchise by having an expansion draft and receiving the number one overall draft pick.

1999 NFL expansion draft

The Cleveland Browns had spent three years with its operations suspended after Art Modell had relocated the Browns' organization and players to Baltimore, Maryland to form the Baltimore Ravens at the end of the 1995 NFL season. Upon returning to the league, in order to become competitive with existing teams, the Browns were awarded the first pick in the 1999 NFL Draft, and the league gave the Browns the opportunity to select current players from the other teams. That selection was provided by the 1999 National Football League expansion draft, held on February 9, 1999. 150 players were left unprotected by their teams for the Browns to draft.

2000 New England Patriots season

The 2000 New England Patriots season was the franchise's 31st season in the National Football League and the 41st overall. They finished with a 5–11 record and in last place in the division.

Following the firing of three-year head coach Pete Carroll in January, Patriots owner Bob Kraft pursued Jets assistant head coach Bill Belichick for the Patriots' head coaching vacancy. Belichick, who had been an assistant coach under Bill Parcells with the Patriots in 1997, followed Parcells to the Jets after that season and was contractually named Parcells' successor. A day after the 1999 season, Parcells resigned as head coach of the Jets and made his second retirement from NFL coaching. Belichick, who had been assistant head coach of the Jets, became the Jets' next head coach. The following day, at a press conference for his hiring, Belichick wrote a resignation note on a napkin ("I resign as HC of the NYJ."), and proceeded to give a half-hour resignation speech to the press. Despite rumors that he had been offered the Patriots' vacant head coaching position, Belichick cited the Jets' uncertain ownership situation following the death of owner Leon Hess earlier that year as the reason for his resignation. The Jets denied Belichick permission to speak with other teams, and as had happened in 1997 with Parcells, the NFL upheld Belichick's contractual obligations to the Jets. Belichick then filed an antitrust lawsuit against the NFL in federal court. After Parcells and Kraft, talking for the first time since Parcells' resignation from the Patriots, agreed to settle their differences, the Patriots and Jets agreed to a compensation package to allow Belichick to become the Patriots' head coach. With the deal, the Patriots sent their first-round pick in the 2000 NFL Draft and fourth and seventh-round picks in the 2001 NFL Draft to the Jets, while also receiving the Jets' fifth-round selection in 2001 and seventh-round pick in the 2002 NFL Draft.Belichick restructured the team's personnel department in the offseason, and later proclaimed that the team "could not win with 40 good players while the other team has 53," after a number of players showed up out of shape for the start of training camp. The Patriots went on to finish the season 5–11, finishing last in the AFC East and missing the playoffs for the second straight season. As of 2018, this represents the Patriots' most recent losing season.

Alabama Crimson Tide football statistical leaders

Alabama Crimson Tide football statistical leaders identify individual statistical leaders of the Alabama Crimson Tide football program in various offensive categories, including passing, rushing, and receptions and defensive categories, including tackles, interceptions and quarterback sacks. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season and career leaders. The Alabama Crimson Tide football program is a college football team that represents the University of Alabama in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) Southeastern Conference (SEC).

Passing leaders applies to various statistical categories held by quarterbacks. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 2010 to 2013 seasons, AJ McCarron graduated as Alabama's career leader in passing yardage (9,019), completions (686) and touchdowns (77). Alabama's current starting quarterback, Tua Tagovailoa, holds the record for passing yards in a single season, with 3,966 yards in 2018. Tagovailoa also holds the record for passing touchdowns in a single season, with 43 in 2018. John Parker Wilson holds the record for completions in a single season (255), set during the 2007 season. Scott Hunter holds the record for passing yards in a single game (484), set against Auburn in 1969; Gary Hollingsworth holds the school's record for most completions in a game (32), set against Tennessee and shares the record for touchdowns in a game (5), set against Ole Miss during the 1989 season. Tagovailoa tied the record for touchdowns in a game in the 2018 Iron Bowl against Auburn.Rushing leaders applies to various statistical categories held by offensive players who advance the ball rushing. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 1996 to 1999 seasons, Shaun Alexander graduated as Alabama's career leader in rushes (727) and rushing yardage (3,565), though his yardage record was broken by Derrick Henry, who accrued 3,591 rushing yards from 2013 to 2015. Mark Ingram Jr. holds the record for career rushing touchdowns (42), set during his career that spanned from 2008 to 2010; this record has since been tied by Derrick Henry. All three major single-season rushing records were set by Henry in 2015: rushes (395), yards (2,219), and touchdowns (28). Single-game records include Henry for rushes (46) set against Auburn during the 2015 season in which he won the Heisman Trophy; Alexander for yardage (291) set against LSU during the 1996 season; and both Alexander and Santonio Beard for touchdowns (5) set against BYU and Ole Miss during the 1998 and 2002 seasons respectively.Receiving leaders applies to various statistical categories held by offensive players who advance the ball by catching Forward passes. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 2004 to 2007 seasons, D. J. Hall graduated as Alabama's career leader in receptions (194) and receiving yardage (2,923). Amari Cooper holds the record for career receiving touchdowns (20), set during his career that spanned from the 2012 to 2014 seasons. Receiving single-season records include Julio Jones with receptions (78) and receiving yards (1,133), and Amari Cooper with touchdown receptions (11) set during the 2010 and 2012 seasons respectively. Single game records for receptions (13) was set against Tennessee during the 2007 season by Hall and against Florida Atlantic during the 2014 season by Cooper; Jones for yardage (221) set against Tennessee during the 2010 season; and Homan, Michael Vaughn and Al Lary for touchdown receptions (3).In addition to offensive records, many who have played for the Crimson Tide have set various defensive records. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 1983 to 1986 seasons, Wayne Davis graduated as Alabama's career leader in tackles (327); Woodrow Lowe as the single-season leader with 134 in 1974; DeMeco Ryans set the single-game record with 25 against Arkansas in 2003. After his career at Alabama that spanned from the 1990 to 1993 seasons, Antonio Langham graduated as Alabama's career leader in interceptions (19); Hootie Ingram as the single-season leader with 10 in 1952; and several players tied with the single game record of three. Derrick Thomas holds every Alabama record for quarterback sacks with 52 during his career from the 1985 to 1988 seasons, 27 in 1988 and five in a single game against Texas A&M in 1988.These stats are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Denny Chimes

Denny Chimes is a 115-foot (35 m) tall campanile tower on the south side of The Quad at the University of Alabama, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The tower was named in honor of George H. Denny, who served as university president from 1912 to 1936 and then again in 1941. It is equipped with a 25-bell carillon. The tower is one of the most visible landmarks on campus.

Kerry Goode

Kerry Goode (born July 28, 1965) is a former professional American football player who played running back for four seasons for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Miami Dolphins.Kerry lead the Hazlewood Golden Bears to state championships both his junior and senior year while being selected as 2A player of the year in football.

He is brother to Chris Goode Pierre Goode, Clyde Goode III and cousin to Antonio Langham. All of these men played their college football at Alabama. Where Kerry was the freshman of year in the Southeastern Conference in 1983.

He coached for the NFL New York Giants 1993-96, and St. Louis Rams 1997-99. Kerry was diagnosed with the Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig disease) in 2015.

List of Alabama Crimson Tide football All-Americans

The Alabama Crimson Tide college football team competes as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and represents the University of Alabama in the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). All-America selections are individual player recognitions made after each season when numerous publications release lists of their ideal team. The NCAA recognizes five All-America lists: the Associated Press (AP), American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). In order for an honoree to earn a "consensus" selection, he must be selected as first team in three of the five lists recognized by the NCAA, and "unanimous" selections must be selected as first team in all five lists.Since the establishment of the team in 1892, Alabama has had 131 players honored a total of 153 times as First Team All-America for their performance on the field of play. Included in these selections are 74 consensus selections, 34 of which were unanimous selections. In 2009, Alabama set both a school and national record for AP All-Americans with six first team selections. The most recent All-Americans from Alabama came after the 2018 season, when Tua Tagovailoa, Jerry Jeudy, Jonah Williams, Ross Pierschbacher, Quinnen Williams, and Deionte Thompson were each named first-team All-America by various selectors.

Offense
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