Antillotyphlops

Antillotyphlops is a genus of snakes in the family Typhlopidae.

Antillotyphlops
Typhlops platycephalus
Antillotyphlops platycephalus,
flathead worm snake
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Suborder: Serpentes
Family: Typhlopidae
Genus: Antillotyphlops
Hedges, Marion, Lipp, Marin & Vidal, 2014

Distribution

The 12 species of the genus Antillotyphlops are found on Caribbean islands.[1]

Species

The following species are recognized as being valid.[1]

Nota bene A binomial authority in parentheses indicates that the species was originally described in a genus other than Antillotyphlops.

References

  1. ^ a b Genus Antillotyphlops at The Reptile Database. www.reptile-database.org.

Further reading

Hedges, S. Blair; Marion, Angela B.; Lipp, Kelly M.; Marin, Julie; Vidal, Nicolas (2014). "A taxonomic framework for typhlopid snakes from the Caribbean and other regions (Reptilia, Squamata)". Caribbean Herpetology 49: 1-61. (Antillotyphlops, new genus, pp. 44-46).

Antillotyphlops catapontus

Antillotyphlops catapontus is a species of snake in the Typhlopidae family.

Dominican blind snake

The Dominican blind snake or Dominican worm snake (Antillotyphlops dominicanus) is a species of blind snake that is endemic to the Caribbean island-nation of Dominica, in the Lesser Antilles.It is widespread, mainly in coastal xeric woodland and associated cultivated lands, but it is uncommonly seen because of its burrowing habits. It can reach 385 mm long. It has a small, rounded head, and colored brown all over, with a lighter ventral surface.

The Guadeloupe blind snake (A. guadeloupensis), endemic to Guadeloupe, is sometimes described as a subspecies, A. d. guadeloupensis, with the Dominican population then classified as the nominate subspecies, A. d. dominicanus.

Flathead worm snake

The flathead worm snake (Antillotyphlops platycephalus) is a species of snake in the Typhlopidae family.

Grant's worm snake

Grant's worm snake (Antillotyphlops granti) is a species of snake in the family Typhlopidae. The species is endemic to Puerto Rico.

IUCN Red List endangered species (Animalia)

On 19 August 2018, the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species identified 4584 endangered species, subspecies, stocks and subpopulations.

Mona worm snake

The Mona worm snake (Antillotyphlops monensis) is a harmless blind snake species is endemic to Mona Island in the West Indies. No subspecies are currently recognized.

Montserrat worm snake

The Montserrat worm snake (Antillotyphlops monastus) is a species of blind snake that is endemic to the Caribbean Lesser Antilles.It has a trunk length up to 258 mm, with a tail up to 44 mm long. Its dorsal surface is medium brown, with a lighter ventral surface. It is insectivorous and fossorial.

It is found on Montserrat.

Puerto Rican coastal blind snake

The Puerto Rican coastal blind snake (Antillotyphlops hypomethes) is a species of snake in the Typhlopidae family.

Richard's worm snake

Richard's worm snake (Antillotyphlops richardi) is a species of snake in the family Typhlopidae.

Saint Barts blind snake

The Saint Barts blind snake (Antillotyphlops annae) is a species of blind snakes in the family Typhlopidae. The species is endemic to the Caribbean island of Saint Barthélemy, an overseas collectivity of France. First described in 1999, It is still not well known.

Typhlopidae

The Typhlopidae are a family of blind snakes. They are found mostly in the tropical regions of Africa, Asia, the Americas, and all mainland Australia and various islands. The rostral scale overhangs the mouth to form a shovel-like burrowing structure. They live underground in burrows, and since they have no use for vision, their eyes are mostly vestigial. They have light-detecting black eye spots, and teeth occur in the upper jaw. The tail ends with a horn-like scale. Most of these species are oviparous. Currently, 18 genera are recognized containing over 200 species.

Typhlops

Typhlops is a genus of blind snakes in the family Typhlopidae. The genus is endemic to the West Indies. Some species which were formerly placed in the genus Typhlops have been moved to the genera Afrotyphlops, Amerotyphlops, Anilios, Antillotyphlops, Argyrophis, Cubatyphlops, Indotyphlops, Letheobia, Madatyphlops, Malayotyphlops, and Xerotyphlops.

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