Antibes

Antibes (/ɒnˈtiːb/, French: [ɑ̃tib]; Provençal Occitan: Antíbol) is a Mediterranean resort in the Alpes-Maritimes department of southeastern France, on the Côte d'Azur between Cannes and Nice.

The town of Juan-les-Pins is in the commune of Antibes and the Sophia Antipolis technology park is northwest of it.

Antibes
October 2006 view of Antibes by the Mediterranean
October 2006 view of Antibes by the Mediterranean
Coat of arms of Antibes

Coat of arms
Location of Antibes
Antibes is located in France
Antibes
Antibes
Antibes is located in Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
Antibes
Antibes
Coordinates: 43°34′51″N 7°07′26″E / 43.5808°N 7.1239°ECoordinates: 43°34′51″N 7°07′26″E / 43.5808°N 7.1239°E
CountryFrance
RegionProvence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
DepartmentAlpes-Maritimes
ArrondissementGrasse
CantonAntibes-1
Antibes-2
Antibes-3
IntercommunalityCA Sophia Antipolis
Government
 • Mayor (2014-2020) Jean Leonetti
Area
1
26.48 km2 (10.22 sq mi)
Population
(2015)2
74,875
 • Density2,800/km2 (7,300/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
06004 /06600
Elevation0–163 m (0–535 ft)
(avg. 9 m or 30 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

History

Origins

Traces of occupation dating back to the early Iron Age have been found[1] in the areas of the castle and cathedral. Remains beneath the Holy Spirit Chapel show there was an indigenous community with ties with Mediterranean populations, including the Etruscans, as evidenced by the presence of numerous underwater amphorae and wrecks off Antibes.[2] However, most trade was with the Greek world, via the Phocaeans of Marseille.

Colony of Marseille

Antibes was founded by Phocaeans from Massilia.[3][4] As a Greek colony (and later Roman) settlement, it was named Antipolis (Greek: Ἀντίπολις, Antípolis, lit. "Cross-City") from its position close to Nice (anc. Nikaia).

Current research suggests that Antipolis was founded relatively late (4th century BC), to benefit from the protection of Marseille with its trade routes along the coast and strongholds like Olbia at Hyères, and trading posts such as Antipolis itself and later Nikaia; it is mentioned by Strabo.[5]

The exact location of the Greek city is not well known. Given Greek colonial practices, it is likely that it was set at the foot of the rock of Antibes in today's old city.[6] Traces of occupation in the Hellenistic period have been identified around the castle and the church (former cathedral). The goods unearthed during these excavations show the dominance of imported products of the Marseilles region, associated with Campanian and indigenous ceramics.

Early in the second century BC the Ligurian Deceates and Oxybiens tribes launched repeated attacks against Nikaia and Antipolis. The Greeks of Marseille appealed to Rome as they had already done a few years earlier against the federation of Salyens. In 154 BC the consul Quintus Opimius defeated the Décéates and Oxybiens and took Aegythna from the Décéates.

Roman Antipolis

Rome gradually increased its hold over the Mediterranean coast. In 43 BC, Antipolis was officially incorporated in the propraetorial (senatorial from 27 BC) province of Narbonesian Gaul, in which it remained for the next 500 years. Antipolis grew into the largest town in the region and a main entry point into Gaul. Roman artifacts such as aqueducts, fortified walls, and amphoræ can still be seen today.

Aqueducts

Aqueduct Antibes Fontveille
Fontveille Aqueduct; section of underground vault
Antibes aquaduct
Bouillide aqueduct

The city was supplied with water by two aqueducts. The Fontvieille aqueduct rises in Biot and eventually joins the coast below the RN7 and the railway track at the Fort Carré. It was discovered and restored in the 18th century by the Chevalier d'Aguillon for supplying the modern city.

The aqueduct called the Bouillide or Clausonnes rises near the town of Valbonne. Monumental remains of aqueduct bridges are located in the neighbourhood of Fugaret, in the forest of Valmasque and near the town of Vallauris.

Aqueduct Antibes Bouillide5
Bouillide Aqueduct

Theatre and amphitheatre

Like most Roman towns Antipolis possessed these buildings for shows and entertainment. A Roman theatre is attested by the tombstone of the child "Septentrion". The inscription says "he danced and was popular on the stage of the theatre" . The theatre was located, like the amphitheatre, between Rue de la République and Rue de Fersen, near the Porte Royale. The back wall is positioned substantially next to Rue Fourmillère. A radial wall was found on the right side of the bus station. A plan of the theatre made in the 16th century is in the Marciana National Library of Venice.

The remains of the amphitheatre were still visible at the end of the 17th century during the restructuring of the fortifications of the city. A concentric oval was still visible in many plans of the seventeenth century and in a map of Antibes from the early nineteenth century. These remains are now covered by the College of Fersen.

Town houses or Villas

Excavations in the old town have discovered well-preserved houses showing some luxury. Among them, the most monumental are those in the rectory garden of rue Clemenceau. These show a comparable level to that of the Gallo-Roman domus such as those of Saint-Romain-en-Gal. Large parts of the floor mosaic are organised around a courtyard with a marble fountain. The building dates from the late third century, although parts date from the end of the Hellenistic era or the end of the Roman Republic. Another house paved with porphyry and green stone was excavated between rue des Palmiers and the rue de la Blancherie. The finds at the Antibes Museum of Archaeology suggests the main occupation between the 2nd and 4th century. Finds from the end of the Hellenistic era and the end of the Roman Republic is present on both sites.

Antipolis in late antiquity

Antipolis became the seat of a bishopric in the 5th century.[5] After the disintegration of the Western Roman Empire, various barbarian tribes seized Antibes. This resulted in destruction and a long period of instability. In the 10th century, Antibes found a protector in Seigneur Rodoart, who built extensive fortified walls around the town and a castle in which to live. For the next 200 years, the town experienced a period of renewal. Prosperity was short-lived, as the whole region fell into disarray for several centuries. The inhabitants of Antibes stayed behind their strong city walls as a succession of wars and epidemics ravaged the countryside. In the 1244, Antibes's bishop moved his see to Grasse.[7] By the end of the 15th century, the region was under the protection and control of King Louis XI of France. Relative stability returned, but the small port of Antibes fell into obscurity.

Modern era

Aerial view of Antibes in 2012 (2)
Aerial view of Antibes, 2012

From around the middle of the 19th century the Antibes area regained its popularity, as wealthy people from around Europe discovered its natural environment and built luxurious homes there. It was transferred from its former department of Var to the new one of Alpes Maritimes in 1860.[3] The harbor was again used for a "considerable" fishing industry and the area exported dried fruit, salt fish, and oil.[3]

By the First World War, it had been connected by rail with Nice and most of its fortifications had been demolished to make way for new residential districts.[7] In 1926, the old Château Grimaldi in Antibes was bought by the local municipality and later restored for use as a museum. Pablo Picasso came to the town in 1946, having visited his friend and fellow painter Gerald Murphy and his wife Sara there in 1923, and was invited to stay in the castle. During his six-month stay, Picasso painted and drew, as well as crafting ceramics and tapestries. When he departed, Picasso left a number of his works to the municipality. The castle has since become the Picasso Museum.

Culture

Conservation

On 25 May 1999, the town was the first in the départment to sign the State Environment Charter, which pledges to actively conserve the natural environment.

Sports

Sport is an important part of the local culture; the town hosts the National Training Centre for basketball. The Jean Bunoz Sports Hall hosted several games of the FIBA EuroBasket 1999. The city is home to Olympique Antibes, a professional basketball team of France's top division LNB Pro A, which plays its home games at the Azur Arena Antibes.

Music

There is a jazz Festival, Jazz à Juan, in July.

Sights

Beaches

Antibes Beach
Plage de la Gravette, as seen from the city's walls
The Beach at Antibes
The rocky beaches of Antibes
Antibes (1)
Aerial view

There are 48 beaches along the 25 km (16 miles) of coastline that surround Antibes and Juan les Pins.

Museums

Archaeology Museum 
This museum sits atop the Promenade Amiral de Grasse in the old Bastion St Andre, a 17th-century fortress. The museum's collection focuses on the classical history of Antibes. Many artifacts, sculptures and amphorae found in local digs and shipwrecks from the harbour are displayed here.
Naval Museum of Napoleon 
Housed in a 17th-century stone fort and tower, this museum presents a collection of Napoleonic memorabilia, paintings and naval models. Several wall paintings show historic moments in Napoleon's reign and there are also pieces of his clothing including one of the hats he wore.
Picasso Museum 
This museum houses one of the world's greatest Picasso collections: 24 paintings, 44 drawings, 32 lithographs, 11 oils on paper, 80 pieces of ceramics, two sculptures and five tapestries.
La Tour Museum 
This small museum in the centre of town brings the contemporary history of Antibes to life through its exhibit of costumes, tools, photographs and other objects used by the local people.
Absinthe Museum 
The Absinthe Museum is located in a basement in the Roman foundations of Old Antibes. It is dedicated to the manufacture and appreciation of this green liqueur.

Parks and gardens

The Exflora Park 
The Exflora Park is a five-hectare (12 acres) garden open to the public. Next to the large olive grove, there are different styles of Mediterranean gardens, from ancient Rome to the exuberant Riviera of the 19th century. Fountains and ponds stretch along the terrace, making a waterway 500 metres (1,600 ft) long. Antibes is renowned for rose production, and rose bushes line the path leading to the sea. The exotic garden and palm grove is reminiscent of the belle époque, when English gardeners succeeded in planting flowers that bloom in winter, the season when the aristocracy visited the Côte d'Azur.
A little further on is the Théâtre de Verdure, inspired by Italian gardens, and a panoramic viewpoint with a view of the sea and the Iles des Lerins. In the style of Provençal gardens of the 18th century, there is a maze with sculpted hedges. Further on, Islamic gardens are featured, with an orange grove where the ground is patterned with terracotta irrigation pipes similar to those in the celebrated Seville Cathedral in Spain. The vegetable gardens and orchards in the Arsat are planted in hollows as in Morocco to protect them from the sun and maximise shadow and humidity. A representation of a Moroccan house pays homage to the painter Majorelle, creator of the blue garden in Marrakesh. In another area, the winter garden contains plants that flower in winter, such as mimosa and camellias.
The Eilenroc Gardens 
Villa Eilenroc was built on a rock in the middle of a virtual desert. The area was transformed into a garden through the patience and talent of Jacques Greber, landscape architect and consultant to the Great Exhibition in New York City in 1939. He was commissioned by Mr Beaumont to create this park of 11 hectares (27 acres).
The gardens lie thirty metres above the sea with a view across the bay of the Cap. Planted with traditional Mediterranean species such as marine and parasol pines, Alep and Canary pines, cypress, oaks, olive trees, arbutus, lavender, thyme, rosemary, eucalyptus, ficus etc., as well as three kilometres (1.9 miles) of pittosporum hedges, a whole part of the park has been created with plants found in the Antibes area in 1920.
Thuret Park 
In 1857, Gustave Thuret discovered the Cap d'Antibes and bought five hectares (12 acres) of land where he built a villa and began the creation of a park. Bequeathed to the state by his heirs, the Jardin botanique de la Villa Thuret is now managed by the INRA (National Institute of Agronomic Research). The collection of trees and exotic plants, and the rich earth, provide many opportunities for learning, and the cross-fertilisation of plant species that grow on the Mediterranean coast.
Marineland 
In 1970, Roland de la Poype created this animal exhibition park in Antibes. First, it was a small oceanarium with a few pools and animals, but now it is one of the biggest in the world and receives more than 1,200,000 visitors per year. It is the only French sea park featuring two cetacean species: killer whales and dolphins.

Garoupe Lighthouse

Phare de la Garoupe
Garoupe Lighthouse.

The old lighthouse of Antibes provides views from its lofty hilltop. To get here, you must walk about one kilometre up the Chemin de Calvaire from the Plage de la Salis. It makes for a nice half-day stroll.

Church of the Immaculate Conception

Cathedrale Antibes
Church of the Immaculate Conception.

The central church in Antibes was first built in the 11th century with stones used from earlier Roman structures. Its current façade was constructed in the 18th century and blends Latin classical symmetry and religious fantasy. The interior houses some impressive pieces such as a Baroque altarpiece and life-sized wooden carving of Christ's death from 1447.

Hôtel du Cap-Eden Roc

This villa, set in "a forest" at the tip of the Cap d'Antibes peninsula, re-creates a nineteenth-century château. Since 1870 the glamorous white-walled Hotel du Cap on the French Riviera has been one of the most storied and luxurious resorts in the world. Guests who flocked there included Marlene Dietrich, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and Winston Churchill. Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton conducted an affair and honeymooned there.

Ports

There are many yachting harbours which provide moorings for a range of ships ranging from fishing vessels to full sized yachts.

  • Port Vauban: The largest yachting harbour in Europe, with more than 2,000 moorings, can accommodate craft of more than 100 metres. This old port was the heart of the ancient Greek city of Antipolis and has a long and colourful history which includes Ligurians, Romans and Crusaders on their way to the Holy Land. Today, it is the largest marina in Europe, serving both local fishing boats and luxury yachts.
  • Port Galice: 542 moorings
  • Port de la Salis: 233 moorings
  • Port du Croûton: 390 moorings
  • Port de l'Olivette: Situated in the sheltered cove of the same name, this is a harbour for sailors and their wooden fishing boats who enjoy the old marine, provencal traditions.
Château Grimaldi, Antibes, Alpes-Maritimes, France
The view of Antibes
Antibes, Alpes Maritimes, France
The view of the Gulf of Antibes

Theatre and music

The Théâtre Antibea, Théâtre des Heures Bleues and Café Théâtre la Scène sur Mer all offer a variety of performances from orchestra music to dramatic plays. Music of all types, from live jazz to DJs spinning techno, can be found in the bars and nightclubs and there are a number of festivals and special outdoor concerts during the summer. Jazz is still the speciality around here, and the Juan les Pins Jazz Festival is one of the best in the world.

M83 (an electronic band) hails from Antibes.

Festivals

Antibes, modern sculpture
Le Nomade, by Jaume Plensa, Bastion St-Jaume, Antibes

Antibes and Juan les Pins host a number of festivals, mainly during the summer months. There's not much in the way of traditional cultural festivals in Antibes; most of the festivals focus on music and contemporary activities.

  • Jazz à Juan remains one of the top jazz festivals in the world. Since its inception in 1960, it has attracted many Jazz artists each year to play outdoors. (July).
  • Antibes Yacht Show
  • The Antique Show of Antibes attracts thousands of collectors for two weeks in April. It's one of the largest shows of its kind in France (April).
  • Voiles d'Antibes is one of the world's biggest gatherings of old teak and brass sailing vessels. They converge on the port for one of the most regal regattas in the Mediterranean (June).
  • The Festival of Saint Peter is the annual celebration of the patron saint of fishermen. A colourful procession through the town is followed by all the local fishermen adorning their boats and floating along the coast (June).
  • The Festival of Sacred Music takes place in Antibes Cathedral, which has renowned acoustics. Sacred music is the theme of this popular festival, which attracts huge crowds each year (January).

Climate

Antibes enjoys a Mediterranean climate.

Climate data for Antibes (France) 1981–2006 averages, extremes 1949–2006
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 19.8
(67.6)
24.4
(75.9)
23.5
(74.3)
27.0
(80.6)
31.9
(89.4)
32.8
(91.0)
36.4
(97.5)
36.5
(97.7)
33.4
(92.1)
29.4
(84.9)
24.6
(76.3)
22.0
(71.6)
36.5
(97.7)
Average high °C (°F) 12.3
(54.1)
12.8
(55.0)
15.1
(59.2)
17.2
(63.0)
21.5
(70.7)
25.4
(77.7)
28.7
(83.7)
28.8
(83.8)
25.0
(77.0)
20.4
(68.7)
15.9
(60.6)
13.2
(55.8)
19.7
(67.5)
Daily mean °C (°F) 9.0
(48.2)
9.3
(48.7)
11.4
(52.5)
13.4
(56.1)
17.5
(63.5)
21.2
(70.2)
24.3
(75.7)
24.5
(76.1)
21.0
(69.8)
17.0
(62.6)
12.7
(54.9)
10.1
(50.2)
16.0
(60.8)
Average low °C (°F) 5.8
(42.4)
5.9
(42.6)
7.7
(45.9)
9.7
(49.5)
13.6
(56.5)
17.0
(62.6)
19.9
(67.8)
20.2
(68.4)
17.0
(62.6)
13.6
(56.5)
9.5
(49.1)
6.9
(44.4)
12.3
(54.1)
Record low °C (°F) −6.9
(19.6)
−7.0
(19.4)
−5.2
(22.6)
2.9
(37.2)
4.8
(40.6)
8.0
(46.4)
10.5
(50.9)
13.0
(55.4)
7.2
(45.0)
4.8
(40.6)
−0.2
(31.6)
−1.8
(28.8)
−7.0
(19.4)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 72.1
(2.84)
47.5
(1.87)
44.6
(1.76)
70.3
(2.77)
49.0
(1.93)
29.5
(1.16)
10.4
(0.41)
25.1
(0.99)
72.1
(2.84)
117.0
(4.61)
104.3
(4.11)
95.6
(3.76)
737.5
(29.04)
Average precipitation days (≥ 1.0 mm) 6.0 4.8 4.8 7.1 5.3 3.5 1.6 2.4 4.9 7.5 7.6 6.7 62.3
Average relative humidity (%) 74 75 75 76 78 78 76 76 78 77 76 74 76.1
Source #1: Météo France[8]
Source #2: Infoclimat.fr (humidity 1961–1990)[9]

Shopping

  • Marché Provençal[10]

Transport

The Gare d'Antibes is the railway station serving the town, offering connections to Nice, Cannes, Marseille, Paris and several other destinations. This railway station is in the centre of town. There is another railway station, Juan les Pins. The nearest airport is Nice Côte d'Azur Airport and Cannes Airport.

Personalities

International relations

Twin towns – sister cities

Antibes is twinned with:

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Patrice Arcelin, Antibes (A.-M.). Chapelle du Saint-Esprit. In : Guyon (J.), Heijmans (M.) éd. – D’un monde à l’autre. Naissance d’une Chrétienté en Provence (IVe-VIe siècle). Arles, 2001, p. 179 (catalogue d’exposition du musée de l’Arles antique)
  2. ^ [Exposition. Marseille, musée d'histoire de Marseille. 2002-2003] Les Étrusques en mer : épaves d'Antibes à Marseille / sous la dir. de Luc Long, Patrice Pomey, Jean-Christophe Sourisseau. - Marseille : Musées de Marseille ; Aix-en-Provence : Edisud, 2002. p 139
  3. ^ a b c EB (1878).
  4. ^ Freely, John, The western shores of Turkey: discovering the Aegean and Mediterranean coasts, p. 91.
  5. ^ a b  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainCoolidge, William Augustus Brevoort (1911). "Antibes" . In Chisholm, Hugh. Encyclopædia Britannica. 2 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 120–121.
  6. ^ Voyage en Massalie. 100 ans d'archéologie en Gaule du Sud. Marseille/Aix-en-Provence, musées de Marseille/Edisud, 1990, p. 142-143 (catalogue d'exposition, Marseille).
  7. ^ a b Coolidge 1911.
  8. ^ "Antibes–Garoupe (06)" (PDF). Fiche Climatologique: Statistiques 1981–2010 et records (in French). Meteo France. Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 March 2018. Retrieved 30 March 2018.
  9. ^ "Normes et records 1961-1990: Antibes - La Garoupe (06) - altitude 82m" (in French). Infoclimat. Archived from the original on 15 March 2016. Retrieved 30 March 2018.
  10. ^ Goldberg, Lina (24 February 2013). "10 of the world's best fresh markets". CNN Travel. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  11. ^ "Aalborg Twin Towns". Europeprize.net/. Archived from the original on 7 September 2013. Retrieved 19 August 2013.

References

External links

2015–16 Pro A season

The 2015–16 LNB Pro A season was the 94th season of the LNB Pro A. The season started on October 3, 2015 and ended June 14, 2016.

Monaco and Antibes Sharks were newcomers this season. Limoges CSP was the defending champion. ASVEL took the title, after beating Strasbourg IG 3–2 in the Finals.

Alpes-Maritimes's 7th constituency

The 7th constituency of Alpes-Maritimes is a French legislative constituency currently represented by Éric Pauget of The Republicans (LR). It contains the town and surrounding areas of Antibes.

Bob Morse

Robert "Bob" Morse (born January 4, 1951) is an American former professional basketball player. He was named one of FIBA's 50 Greatest Players in 1991. In 2008, Morse was chosen as one of the 50 most influential personalities in European club basketball, over the previous half-century.

FC Antibes

Football Club Antibes Juan-les-Pins is a French association football team based in Antibes. The team currently plays at an amateur and regional level but was part of Division 1 for 7 seasons, from its beginning in 1932 to 1939.

Isaïa Cordinier

Isaïa Cordinier (born November 28, 1996) is a French professional basketball player for the Antibes Sharks of the LNB Pro A league. He is a 196 cm (6’5") tall shooting guard.

Juan-les-Pins

Juan-les-Pins (French pronunciation: ​[ʒɥɑ̃ le pɛ̃]; Occitan: Joan dei Pins) is a town and a health resort and spa in the commune of Antibes, in the Alpes-Maritimes, in southeastern France, on the Côte d'Azur. It is situated between Nice and Cannes, 13 kilometres (8 mi) from Nice Côte d'Azur Airport.

It is a major holiday destination popular with the international jet-set, with casino, nightclubs and beaches, which are made of fine grained sand, and are not straight, but instead are cut with small inlets.

LNB Pro A

The LNB Pro A, commonly known as Pro A and for sponsorship reasons named the Jeep Élite, is the top-tier level men's professional basketball league in France. The competition has existed since 1921. Since 1987, the Ligue Nationale de Basket has organized the league. The bottom two placed teams from each season are relegated to the second tier level Pro B. The winner of the play-offs of the Pro A is crowned the French national champion.

LNB Pro B

The LNB Pro B, commonly known as Pro B, is the 2nd-tier level men's professional basketball league in France. It is the second division of the Ligue Nationale de Basket (LNB), which has organized the league since the year 1987. The top two placed teams from each Pro B season are promoted to the top-tier level LNB Pro A. The two last placed teams are relegated to the third level NM1.

Marineland of Antibes

The Marineland of Antibes is a theme park founded in 1970 by Roland de La Poype in Antibes (Alpes-Maritimes), in the French Riviera. On 26 hectares it includes a marine zoological park with dolphinarium, a water park (Aquasplash), a children's play park (Kid's Island), a mini golf (Aventure Golf) and a three-star hotel (Marineland Resort). It is the property of the Spanish multinational company Parques Reunidos, whose majority shareholder is the British investment fund Arle Capital Partners. The actual director is Arnaud Palu.

It is one of the four French dolphinariums and one of the two European dolphinariums presenting orcas. With 1.2 million visitors in 2014, it's the most visited site of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region. The zoological park is one of the most visited in France.

Since the 2010s, it is more and more criticised by the opponents to cetacean captivity, which claims that dolphinariums can't assure captivity conditions that fits to the proper needs of those species, leading to a prematurate mortality of individuals.

Mingus at Antibes

Mingus at Antibes was originally issued by BYG Records under the title Charles Mingus Live With Eric Dolphy in Japan in 1974. It was recorded at a live 1960 performance at the Jazz à Juan festival at Juan-les-Pins by jazz bassist and composer Charles Mingus; and was re-released by Atlantic Records in more complete form as a double album with the title Mingus In Antibes in the United States in 1976.

The album captures a performance at Jazz à Juan, and features some of Mingus's then regular musicians in a generally piano-less quintet, though the band is joined by Bud Powell on "I'll Remember April", and Mingus himself plays some piano on "Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting" and "Better Git Hit in Your Soul".

Musée Picasso (Antibes)

See also Château Grimaldi (disambiguation) for other Châteaux of the same name.

The Musée Picasso, formerly the Château Grimaldi at Antibes, is built upon the foundations of the ancient Greek town of Antipolis. Antibes is a resort town in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France, on the Mediterranean Sea.

Numa Andoire

Numa Andoire (19 March 1908 – 2 January 1994) was a French football defender and a manager. He participated at the 1930 FIFA World Cup, but never gained any caps with the French football team.

He played for FC Antibes, OGC Nice, Red Star Olympique, AS Cannes, FC Nancy, Toulouse and FC Antibes again.

He coached FC Antibes, Constantine and OGC Nice. He then retired from football and ran a hostel in Juan-les-Pins. He came back to football with OGC Nice and managed team again from 1962 to 1964.

Olympique Antibes

Olympique Antibes Juan-les-Pins Côte d'Azur, or OAJLP, or Antibes Sharks, is a basketball club from the city of Antibes, France. The club's men's senior team currently plays in LNB Pro A, the French first division.

Sophia Antipolis

Sophia Antipolis is a technology park in France. Much of the park falls within the commune of Valbonne, which lies northwest of Antibes and southwest of Nice, France. Created in 1970–1984, it houses primarily companies in the fields of computing, electronics, pharmacology and biotechnology. Several institutions of higher learning are also located here, along with the European headquarters of W3C and the ETSI. In the early years, one of the main challenges of Sophia Antipolis was to relate people and to create a sense of community. The "Human Factor" is what was to distinguish the Science and Technology Park in the world as a landmark of science, invention, innovation and research. It was to focus on building an international environment, creating an international community. This means taking into account and improving tenant interaction, networking and cross fertilization of ideas. The concept was that bringing together people from different intellectual horizons and "making" them meet, would bring added value and generate innovation. Many professional clubs were thus launched: The Sophia business angels club, the Sophia Nordic link, Art Sophia, Telecom Valley are just a few.

Sophia Antipolis is named after Sophie Glikman-Toumarkine, the wife of French Senator Pierre Laffitte, founder of the park, and incidentally, Sophia, the Greek word for wisdom, and Antipolis, the ancient Greek name of Antibes. Many of the roads within the technology park have Greek names. There is a giant sculptured Greek urn as a centre-piece on one of the roundabouts.

Timothé Luwawu-Cabarrot

Timothé Luwawu-Cabarrot (born May 9, 1995) is a French professional basketball player for the Chicago Bulls of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He was selected with the 24th overall pick by the Philadelphia 76ers in the 2016 NBA draft.

Tyler Harvey (basketball)

Tyler Jordon Harvey (born July 17, 1993) is an American professional basketball player for the Memphis Hustle of the NBA G League. He played college basketball for the Eastern Washington Eagles. He primarily plays the point guard and shooting guard positions. Harvey graduated from Bishop Montgomery High School of Torrance, California in 2011. According to Eagles head coach Jim Hayford, Harvey was the player the team was "building their basketball program on" as a sophomore.

Vilmos Kohut

Vilmos "Willy" Kohut (17 July 1906 – 18 February 1986) was a Hungarian footballer. He played as a striker for the Ferencvárosi TC, French team Olympique Marseille and the Hungarian national team. Kohut got 25 caps and 14 goals for the Hungarian national team between 1925 and 1938. He represented his country at the 1938 FIFA World Cup and scored 1 goal in 2 matches.

Will Solomon

William James "Will" Solomon (born July 20, 1978) is an American professional basketball player who last played for Shark Antibes of the French League. Standing at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), he plays at the point guard and shooting guard positions.

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