Annuario Pontificio

The Annuario Pontificio (Italian for Pontifical Yearbook) is the annual directory of the Holy See of the Catholic Church. It lists all the popes to date and all officials of the Holy See's departments. It also gives complete lists with contact information of the cardinals and Catholic bishops throughout the world, the dioceses (with statistics about each), the departments of the Roman Curia, the Holy See's diplomatic missions abroad, the embassies accredited to the Holy See, the headquarters of religious institutes (again with statistics on each), certain academic institutions, and other similar information. The index includes, along with all the names in the body of the book, those of all priests who have been granted the title of "Monsignor". As the title suggests, the red-covered yearbook, compiled by the Central Statistics Office of the Church and published by Libreria Editrice Vaticana, is mostly in Italian.

The 2015 edition had more than 2,400 pages and cost €78.[2]

According to the Pontifical Yearbook of 2017, the number of Catholics in the world increased to 1,284,810,000 at the end of 2015.

Annuario Pontificio
Annuario Pontificio 2008 (MK)
Annuario Pontifico 2008 edition.
AuthorLibreria Editrice Vaticana,
Secretary of State
CountryVatican City
LanguageItalian
GenreReference yearbook
PublisherHoly See
Publication date
Annual publication (1912-)
Media typeHardcover
ISBN9788820997472 [1]

History

A yearbook of the Catholic Church was published, with some interruptions, from 1716 to 1859 by the Cracas printing firm in Rome, under the title (in Italian) Information for the Year ... From 1851, a department of the Holy See began producing a different publication called (in Italian) Hierarchy of the Holy Catholic Apostolic Church Worldwide and in Every Rite, with historical notes, which took the title Annuario Pontificio in 1860, but ceased publication in 1870. This was the first yearbook published by the Holy See itself, but its compilation was entrusted to the newspaper Giornale di Roma. The publishers "Fratelli Monaldi" (Monaldi Brothers) began in 1872 to produce their own yearbook entitled (in Italian) The Catholic Hierarchy and the Papal Household for the Year ... with an appendix of other information concerning the Holy See.

The Vatican Press took this over in 1885, thus making it a semi-official publication. It bore the indication "official publication" from 1899 to 1904, but this ceased when, giving the word "official" a more restricted sense, the Acta Sanctae Sedis, forerunner of the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, was declared the only "official" publication of the Holy See. In 1912, it resumed the title Annuario Pontificio. From 1912 to 1924, it included not only lists of names, but also brief illustrative notes on departments of the Roman Curia and on certain posts within the papal court, a practice to which it returned in 1940.

For some years, beginning in 1898, the Maison de la Bonne Presse publishing house of Paris produced a similar yearbook in French called Annuaire Pontifical Catholique, not compiled by the Holy See. This contained much additional information, such as detailed historical articles on the Swiss Guards and the Papal Palace at the Vatican.

Statistical data

According to the Annuario Pontificio 2012 the statistical data given in the yearbook regarding archdioceses and dioceses are furnished by the diocesan curias concerned and reflect the diocesan situation on 31 December of the year prior to the date on the yearbook, unless there is another indication. The data recorded are shown in the following order next to these abbreviations:

  • Su – area in square kilometers of the diocesan territory
  • pp – population of the diocese
  • ct – number of Catholics
  • pr – parishes and quasi-parishes
  • ch – churches or mission stations
  • sd – secular priests resident in the diocese
  • dn – diocesan priests ordained during the year
  • sr – religious priests resident in the diocese
  • rn – religious priests ordained during the year
  • dp – permanent deacons
  • sm – seminarians taking courses of philosophy and theology
  • rm – members of men's religious institutes
  • rf – members of women's religious institutes
  • ie – educational institutes
  • ib – charitable institutes
  • ba – baptisms

See also

References

  1. ^ 2016
  2. ^ "Annuario Pontificio 2015". Città del Vaticano. Retrieved April 5, 2016.

Bibliography

  1. ^ http://www.libreriaeditricevaticana.va/content/libreriaeditricevaticana/it/novita-editoriali/annuario-pontificio-2018.html
  2. ^ https://www.vaticanum.com/en/annuario-pontificio-2018-pontifical-yearbook-2018-catholic-church-directory-vatican-publishing-house-lev
Archbishop

In Christianity, an archbishop (, via Latin archiepiscopus, from Greek αρχιεπίσκοπος, from αρχι-, 'chief', and επίσκοπος, 'bishop') is a bishop of higher rank or office. In some cases, such as the Lutheran Church of Sweden and the Church of England, the title is borne by the leader of the denomination. Like popes, patriarchs, metropolitans, cardinal bishops, diocesan bishops, and suffragan bishops, archbishops are in the highest of the three traditional orders of bishops, priests (also called presbyters), and deacons. An archbishop may be granted the title or ordained as chief pastor of a metropolitan see or another episcopal see to which the title of archbishop is attached.

Bacatha in Palaestina

Bacatha in Palestina was a town and episcopal see in the late Roman province of Palaestina Salutaris or Palaestina Tertia (today's southern Israel and Jordan), the provincial capital and metropolitan see of which was Petra. As a diocese that is no longer residential, it is listed in the Annuario Pontificio among titular sees.The names of four of its bishops are known: Alypius took part in the Second Council of Ephesus in 449, and Gregory in the Council of Chalcedon in 518; Barachus is mentioned in relation to events of 532 and 536; and in 649 there was an exchange of letters between Anthony and Pope Martin I.

Belarusian Greek Catholic Church

The Belarusian Greek Catholic Church (Belarusian: Беларуская грэка-каталіцкая царква, BHKC), sometimes called, in reference to its Byzantine Rite, the Belarusian Byzantine Catholic Church, is the heir within Belarus of the Union of Brest and Ruthenian Uniate Church. It is listed in the Annuario Pontificio as a sui iuris Church, an Eastern rite particular Church in full union with the Catholic Church.

Bonitza

The former residential episcopal see of Bonitza, centred on a town in the Roman province of Epirus Vetus, is now a titular see of the Catholic Church. The town that was the centre of the diocese is now called Vonitsa (Greek: Βόνιτσα). It is unknown when the residential bishopric disappeared.

Catholic Church in Georgia

The Catholic Church in Georgia, since the 11th-century East–West Schism, has been composed mainly of Latin-Rite Catholics; Catholic communities of the Armenian Rite have existed in the country since the 18th century.

A Georgian Byzantine Rite Catholic community, though small, has existed for a number of centuries but does not, however, constitute an autonomous ("sui iuris") Church. Canon 27 of the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches defines these Churches as under a hierarchy of their own and recognized as autonomous by the supreme authority of the Church. "No organized Georgian Greek Catholic Church ever existed", though, outside Georgia, "a small Georgian Byzantine Catholic parish has long existed in Istanbul. Currently it is without a priest. Twin male and female religious orders 'of the Immaculate Conception' were founded there in 1861, but have since died out." This was never established as a recognized particular church of any level (exarchate, ordinariate, etc.), within the communion of Catholic Churches, and accordingly has never appeared in the list of Eastern Catholic Churches published in the Annuario Pontificio.

Catholic Church in South Sudan

The Catholic Church in South Sudan is composed of one ecclesiastical province with one archdiocese and six suffragan dioceses. The bishops of South Sudan and Sudan are currently members of one single bishops' conference, designated as Sudan Catholic Bishops’ Conference.

According to the World Christian Encyclopedia, the Catholic Church was the largest single Christian body in Sudan since 1995, with 2.7 million Catholics mainly concentrated in South Sudan.According to the most recent figures of the Annuario Pontificio, 37.2% of the population is Catholic, with about 6.2 million Catholics out of a total population of 16.7 million.

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir Mayardit is a Catholic.

The patron saint is Bakhita.

Catholic religious order

A Catholic religious order is a religious order of the Catholic Church. According to the 1983 Code of Canon Law, they form part of a category of Catholic religious institutes.

Subcategories are canons regular (canons and canonesses regular who recite the Divine Office and serve a church and perhaps a parish); monastics (monks or nuns living and working in a monastery and reciting the Divine Office); mendicants (friars or religious sisters who live from alms, recite the Divine Office, and, in the case of the men, participate in apostolic activities); and clerks regular (priests who take religious vows and have a very active apostolic life).

Original Catholic religious orders of the Middle Ages include the Order of Saint Benedict, the Carmelites, the Order of Friars Minor, the Dominican Order, and the Order of Saint Augustine. As such, also the Teutonic Order may qualify, as today it is mainly monastic.

In the past, what distinguished religious orders from other institutes was the classification of the vows that the members took in religious profession as solemn vows. According to this criterion, the last religious order founded was that of the Bethlehem Brothers in 1673. Nevertheless, in the course of the 20th century, some religious institutes outside the category of orders obtained permission to make solemn vows, at least of poverty, thus blurring the distinction.

Congregation (Catholic)

In the Roman Catholic Church, the term "congregation" is used not only in the senses that it has in other contexts (to indicate, for instance, a gathering for worship or some other purpose), but also to mean specifically either a type of department of the Roman Curia, or a type of religious institute, or certain organized groups of Augustinian, Benedictine, and Cistercian houses.

Ecclesiastical Statistics

Ecclesiastical Statistics is the practice that many churches have of trying to actively count their congregants. The French Annuaire pontifical catholique used to provide global statistics on the Roman Catholic Church. Today such global statistics (arranged by country and continent) are given in the Statistical Yearbook of the Church and (arranged by diocese) in Annuario Pontificio.

Eudocia (Lycia)

Eudocia (Ancient Greek: Εὐδοκία) was a town in ancient Lycia.

Although William Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) said that the Synecdemus of Hierocles mentions four towns in Asia Minor called Eudocia (Εὐδοκία), including one in Lycia, other scholars report the Synecdemus as calling one or more of them Eudocias or Eudoxias. and the name of the Lycian town as it appears in the text of the Synecdemus as edited by Parthey in 1866 is clearly Eudocias (Εὐδοκιάς), while noting that in some Notitiae Episcopatuum the name is given as Eudoxias (Εὐδοξιάς).Lequien, who mentions no town in Lycia called Eudocia, says that the Synecdemus called a town in Lycia Eudocias and one in Pamphylia Eudoxias, but that other sources speak of the Pamphylian town also as Eudocias. He sees in the presence in the Synecdemus both of a Lycian Telmessus and a Lycian Eudocias and also of a Pamphylian Termessus and a Pamphylian Eudoxias or Eudocias proof that they were all distinct cities. It is curious then that, although, when speaking of Telmessus, he says that it was the Pamphylian Termessus and the Pamphylian Eudocias that for long had the same bishop, when he speaks of the Lycian Eudocias, he attributes to that see the same bishops that he attributes elsewhere to the Pamphylian Eudocias, calling the two most ancient one either bishops of Telmessus and Eudocias (when speaking of Lycia) or bishops of Termessus and Eudocias (when speaking of Pamphylia). The bishops that he mentions for both towns that he calls Eudocias are Timotheus (at the 431 Council of Ephesus), Zenodotus (at the 451 Council of Ephesus), and Photius or Photinus (at the 787 Second Council of Nicaea).The more recent study by Gams makes no mention of any bishopric in Lycia called either Eudocias or Eudocia, but mentions both the Lycian Telmessus and the Pamphylian Termessus and Eudocias.The Annuario Pontificio speaks of a no longer residential, and therefore now titular, episcopal see in the Roman province of Lycia as called Eudocia. It was a suffragan of Myra, the metropolitan see and capital of that province. The Annuario Pontificio states that the town that it calls Eudocia was near Makri, the name that at least by the 9th century was given to the city previously called Telmessus, which is now Fethiye, Muğla Province, Turkey.

Helenopolis (Palaestina Secunda)

Helenopolis (Greek: Ἑλενόπολις) was a town and episcopal see in the late Roman province of Palaestina Secunda, in the Byzantine Empire.

It was named for the mother of Constantine the Great, Helena. It is identified as either modern Daburiyya or with Kafr Kama.As a diocese that is no longer residential, it is listed in the Annuario Pontificio among titular sees of the Roman Catholic Church. Its last titular bishop was John Francis Hackett.

Ibora

Ibora was a city in the late Roman province of Helenopontus, which became a Christian bishopric. It is now called İverönü, Erbaa in present-day Tokat Province, Turkey. This is stated also by the Annuario Pontificio, which lists the bishopric as a titular see.The article by Siméon Vailhé in the 1910 Catholic Encyclopedia placed its site at modern Turhal in the same modern province.

Institute of consecrated life

An institute of consecrated life is an association of faithful in the Catholic Church erected by canon law whose members profess the evangelical counsels of chastity, poverty, and obedience by vows or other sacred bonds. They are defined in the Code of Canon Law under canons 573–730.

The more numerous form of these are religious institutes, which are characterized by the public profession of vows, life in common as brothers or sisters, and a degree of separation from the world. They are defined in the Code of Canon Law under canons 607–709. The other form is that of secular institutes, in which the members live in the world, and work for the sanctification of the world from within.Institutes of consecrated life need the written approval of a bishop to operate within his diocese, and a diocesan bishop can erect an institute of consecrated life in his own territory, after consulting the Apostolic See.The Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life has ecclesial oversight of institutes of consecrated life.

Institutes of consecrated life are canonically erected by competent church authorities to enable men or women who publicly profess the evangelical counsels by religious vows or other sacred bonds "through the charity to which these counsels lead to be joined to the Church and its mystery in a special way" without this making them members of the Church hierarchy.Apart from being a member of an institute, consecrated life may also be lived individually; the Catholic Church recognises, as forms of individual consecrated life that are not members of institutes, namely that of hermits and consecrated virgins.

James Green (bishop)

James Patrick Green (born 30 May 1950, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church serving as Apostolic Nuncio to Sweden since 2017.

Ordinariate for Catholics of Armenian Rite in Romania

The Ordinariate for Catholics of Armenian Rite in Romania (Romanian: Ordinariatul Armeano-Catolic), based in Gherla, is an ordinariate for Eastern Catholic faithful that is part of the Armenian Catholic Church, itself under the authority of the Pope. It serves Catholic members of Romania's Armenian community living in Transylvania.

Papal household

The papal household or pontifical household (usually not capitalized in the media and other nonofficial use, Latin: Pontificalis Domus), called until 1968 the Papal Court (Aula Pontificia), consists of dignitaries who assist the pope in carrying out particular ceremonies of either a religious or a civil character.

It is organised into two bodies: the Papal Chapel (Cappella Pontificia), which assists the pope in his functions as spiritual head of the church, especially in religious ceremonies; and the Papal Family or Household (Familia Pontificia), which assists him as head of a juridical body with civil functions.

Pope-elect Stephen

Pope-elect Stephen (d. 26 March 752) was a Roman priest elected pope in March 752 to succeed Zachary; he died of a stroke a few days later, before being consecrated a bishop. Therefore, he is not listed as a pope in the Annuario Pontificio.

In 745, Pope Zachary had made him a cardinal-priest, with the titulus of San Crisogono, the same titulus later held by Cardinal Frederick of Lorraine, who became Pope Stephen IX.

Prefecture of the Pontifical Household

The Prefecture of the Papal Household is the office in charge of the Papal Household, a section of the Roman Curia that comprises the Papal Chapel (Cappella Pontificia) and the Papal Family (Familia Pontificia).

The current Prefect of the household is Archbishop Georg Gänswein, appointed on 7 December 2012.

Slovak Greek Catholic Church

The Slovak Greek Catholic Church (Slovak: Gréckokatolícka cirkev na Slovensku, "Greek-Catholic Church in Slovakia"), or Slovak Byzantine Catholic Church, is a Metropolitan sui iuris Eastern particular Church in full union with the Catholic Church. Its liturgical rite is the Byzantine Rite. L'Osservatore Romano of January 31, 2008 reported that, in Slovakia alone, it had some 350,000 faithful, 374 priests and 254 parishes. In addition, the 2012 Annuario Pontificio gave its Canadian Eparchy of Saints Cyril and Methodius of Toronto as having 2,000 faithful, 4 priests and 5 parishes. The Slovak Greek Catholic Church is in full communion with the Holy See.

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