Annie Award

The Annie Awards are accolades presented annually by the Los Angeles branch of the International Animated Film Association, ASIFA-Hollywood since 1972,[1] to recognize excellence in animation in film and television. Originally designed to celebrate lifetime or career contributions to animation, since 1992 it has given awards to individual films.

Memberships in the ASIFA-Hollywood consist of three main categories: General Member, Patron and Student Member. Joining ASIFA-Hollywood is open to professionals, students and fans of animation, for a membership fee. Selected professional members are permitted to vote for the Annie.

The 46th Annie Awards ceremony took place on February 2, 2019, on the campus of UCLA.

Annie Award
46th Annie Awards
Annie Award
Awarded forExcellence in animation
CountryUnited States
Presented byASIFA-Hollywood
First awardedNovember 1972
Websiteannieawards.org

History

In 1972, June Foray conceived the idea that there should be awards for animation as there were no awards for the field. With the approval of ASIFA-Hollywood president Nick Bosustow, Annie Awards ceremony was organized. The first ceremony was held at the banquet room of Sportsmen's Lodge in Ventura Boulevard in Studio City, Los Angeles, California. Max Fleischer and Dave Fleischer were the first to be honored by the first Annie Awards for creating the characters Betty Boop, Popeye and Olive Oyl, and for inventing the technique of rotoscoping.[2]

Naming "Annie Awards"

According to Foray, her husband Hobart Donavan suggested that the awards be called "Annie" since the awards are for excellence in animation.

Trophy

The first Annie Award trophy was given out in the second awards ceremony to Walter Lantz, the founder of Walter Lantz Productions and creator of Woody Woodpecker. The trophy was a brass prize shaped like a zoetrope and was made out of wood and plastic. The next year, Tom Woodward came up with the current design.

Award categories

Production

Individual achievement in Film

Individual achievement in Television, Broadcast and Video Game

  • Outstanding Animated Effects
  • Outstanding Character Animation
  • Outstanding Character Design
  • Outstanding Directing
  • Outstanding Music
  • Outstanding Production Design
  • Outstanding Storyboarding
  • Outstanding Voice Acting
  • Outstanding Writing
  • Outstanding Editorial

Juried awards

Balloting controversies and criticism

2008

In 2008, the Annie Award nominees for Best Short Subject included two Walt Disney cartoons, a Pixar short, and two independent films: Picnic Pictures' The Chestnut Tree, and Don Hertzfeldt's short Everything Will Be OK. Official rules for the Annie Awards state that voting members must view all nominated achievements in their entirety before casting their ballot for a winner. Members are directed to view the nominated films on a secure website.

When the online ballot launched on January 15, the two independent films were not included for voters to judge. ASIFA acknowledged this error over a week later, at which point all the votes were reportedly thrown out and the balloting system was reset. Voters were instructed to return and re-vote the category. "The Chestnut Tree" was now uploaded properly to the ballot, however Everything Will Be OK was again not included: this time, the online ballot only played a portion of this film's 17-minute running time to voters, abruptly cutting out in the middle of a scene. ASIFA again took several days to repair the ballot, but this time allowed voting to continue.

By the time the ballot officially closed on February 1, Everything Will Be OK was only available to voters for less than 24 hours of the entire 18-day voting period.[3] Even though ASIFA apologized to Don Hertzfeldt (who would eventually win the award for his 2015 Oscar-nominated film World of Tomorrow), they took no further action and carried on with the event, awarding the prize to the Pixar short Your Friend the Rat.

Notable nominations

The following nominees (motion pictures, TV shows, and direct-to-video films) received multiple nominations:

Nominations Film/TV
48
The Simpsons
34 Mickey Mouse
24 The Fairly OddParents
King of the Hill
21
Futurama
20
Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends
19
Star Wars: The Clone Wars
17
SpongeBob SquarePants
16 How to Train Your Dragon
The Incredibles
Kung Fu Panda
15 The Iron Giant
Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit
14 Dragons: Riders of Berk
Inside Out
Gravity Falls
13 Coco
The Boxtrolls
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Ratatouille
12 Adventure Time
Dexter's Laboratory
Finding Nemo
Kung Fu Panda 2
Mulan
The Penguins of Madagascar
Shrek
11 My Life as a Teenage Robot
The Emperor's New Groove
Family Guy
Kung Fu Panda: Legends of Awesomeness
Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice
Tarzan
Zootopia
10 Batman Beyond
Brave
Coraline
Frozen
How to Train Your Dragon 2
Incredibles 2
Kubo and the Two Strings
Lilo & Stitch
Monsters University
Pinky and the Brain
Rise of the Guardians
Samurai Jack
Surf's Up
The Good Dinosaur
Ralph Breaks the Internet
Trollhunters
Wreck-It Ralph
9 Animaniacs
Anastasia
Cars
Madagascar
The Powerpuff Girls
Puss in Boots
Rango
Toy Story
Toy Story 2
Up
8 Brother Bear
Cats Don't Dance
Flushed Away
Hotel Transylvania
Kung Fu Panda: Secrets of the Furious Five
Monsters, Inc.
Over the Hedge
ParaNorman
Prep & Landing
The Princess and the Frog
Rio
The Road to El Dorado
Shrek 2
Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron
Winnie the Pooh
7 Avatar: The Last Airbender
Batman: The Animated Series
Big Hero 6
Cars 2
Despicable Me
Early Man
Ice Age
Invader ZIM
Kim Possible
Kung Fu Panda Holiday
The Mighty B!
Pocahontas
Song of the Sea
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Treasure Planet
WALL-E
6 Arthur Christmas
Atlantis: The Lost Empire
Chowder
Cow and Chicken
El Tigre: The Adventures of Manny Rivera
Johnny Bravo
The Lion King
Merry Madagascar
Megamind
Moana
Monster House
Osmosis Jones
The Amazing World of Gumball
The Lego Movie
The Ren & Stimpy Show
Shark Tale
Timon & Pumbaa
5 101 Dalmatians: The Series
The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn
The Angry Beavers
Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas
Bolt
The Book of Life
Danny Phantom
Dinosaur
Ernest & Celestine
Fantasia 2000
Frankenweenie
Gargoyles
A Goofy Movie
Great Minds Think For Themselves
Horton Hears a Who!
The Jungle Book 2
The Illusionist
The Legend of Korra
Mary Poppins Returns
Mickey Mouse Works
The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists!
Pooh's Grand Adventure: The Search for Christopher Robin
The Prince of Egypt
Scared Shrekless
Shaun the Sheep Movie
Shrek Forever After
Steven Universe
TRON: Uprising
The Tick
Time Squad
4 Isle of Dogs
3 South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut

The following winners (motion pictures, TV shows, and direct-to-video films) received multiple awards:

Awards Film/TV
30 The Simpsons
19 Mickey Mouse
11 Coco
10 How to Train Your Dragon
The Incredibles
Inside Out
Kung Fu Panda
Mulan
Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit
9 Finding Nemo
Futurama
The Iron Giant
Ratatouille
8 Shrek
Toy Story
7 Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Toy Story 2
6 How to Train Your Dragon 2
Samurai Jack
SpongeBob SquarePants
Zootopia
5 Avatar: The Last Airbender
Flushed Away
Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends
Frozen
Kung Fu Panda Holiday
Pinky and the Brain
Wreck-It Ralph
4 Dragons: Riders of Berk
The Fairly OddParents
Hercules
Kung Fu Panda 3
King of the Hill
The Penguins of Madagascar
Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice
Kung Fu Panda: Secrets of the Furious Five
Pocahontas
Rango
Spirited Away
Trollhunters
3 Batman Beyond
Coraline
Cow and Chicken
Despicable Me 3
Duckman: Private Dick/Family Man
The Emperor's New Groove
Family Guy
Fantasia 2000
Ice Age: Continental Drift
Kubo and the Two Strings
The Lion King
Toy Story 3
Over the Hedge
Prep & Landing
The Princess and the Frog

See also

References

  1. ^ "ASIFA-Hollywood - History". ASIFA-Hollywood. Retrieved 2016-08-17.
  2. ^ Annie Awards-History
  3. ^ "Why Don Hertzfeldt Probably Won't Win an Annie". Cartoonbrew.com. Archived from the original on June 16, 2008. Retrieved 2011-06-04.

External links

Adam and Dog

Adam and Dog is a 2011 American animated short film by Minkyu Lee. The film was nominated for Best Animated Short Film for the 85th Academy Awards and won Best Animated Short Subject at the 39th Annie Awards.After being nominated for an Academy Award, the film was released along with all the other 15 Oscar-nominated short films in theaters by ShortsHD.

Annie Award for Best Animated Feature

The Annie Award for Best Animated Feature is an Annie Award introduced in 1992, awarded annually to the best animated feature film. In 1998 the award was renamed Outstanding Achievement in an Animated Theatrical Feature, only to revert to its original title again in 2001.

Annie Award for Best Animated Video Game

The Annie Award for Best Animated Video Game was awarded annually by ASIFA-Hollywood, a non-profit organization that honors contributions to animation, to one animated video game each year from 2005 to 2014. The award is one of the Annie Awards, which are given to contributions to animation, including producers, directors, and voice actors. The Annie Awards were created in 1972 by June Foray to honor individual lifetime contributions to animation. In 1992, the scope of the awards was expanded to honor animation as a whole; the Annie Award for Best Animated Feature was created as a result of this move, and subsequent awards have been created to recognize different contributions to animation. The Annie Award for Best Animated Video Game was created in 2005, and has been awarded yearly since except in 2009. To be eligible for the award, the game must have been released in the year before the next Annie Awards ceremony, and the developers of the game must send a five-minute DVD that shows the gameplay and graphics of the game to a committee appointed by the Board of Directors of ASIFA-Hollywood.The Annie Award for Best Animated Video Game has been awarded to nine video games. The now-defunct video game development company THQ had six of its games nominated for the Annie Award for Best Animated Video Game, and one of them, Ratatouille, won the award. Among the nominees, seven video games are adaptations of a feature film and three are adaptations of animated television series. Although most nominees have been released for multiple video game consoles, three of the entrants to the 38th Annie Awards (held February 5, 2011) and five contenders at the 39th Annie Awards had only been released on one platform at the time.

Annie Award for Directing in a Feature Production

The Annie Award for Directing in a Feature Production (or Annie Award for Directing in an Animated Feature Production) is an Annie Award, awarded annually to the best animated feature film and introduced in 1996. It reward directing for animated feature films. The recipients are directors as well as co-directors.

The award was formerly called Best Individual Achievement: Directing in 1996, Best Individual Achievement: Directing in a Feature Production in 1997, and Outstanding Individual Achievement for Directing in an Animated Feature Production from 1998 to 2001.The award has matched up with the Annie Award for Best Animated Feature every year except for 1997, 2006 and 2011. It has been awarded 15 times. Pete Docter, Rich Moore, John Lasseter and Lee Unkrich have won it twice, and Brad Bird hold a record of three wins.

Annie Award for Music in a Feature Production

The Annie Award for Music in a Feature Production (or Annie Award for Music in an Animated Feature Production) is an Annie Award given annually to the best music in an animated feature film, theatrical or direct-to-video. It began in 1997 as the Annie Award for Best Individual Achievement: Music in a Feature/Home Video Production. Throughout the following years, the title was renamed Outstanding Individual Achievement for Music in an Animated Feature Production, Outstanding Individual Achievement for Music Score in an Animated Feature Production, and Outstanding Music in an Animated Feature Production before changing to its current title in 2005. It was retitled Best Music in an Animated Feature Production in 2006 for three years before being reverted to Music in an Animated Feature Production in 2009.

Annie Award for Voice Acting in a Feature Production

The Annie Award for Voice Acting in a Feature Production (or Annie Award for Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production) is an Annie Award awarded annually to the best animated feature film and introduced in 1998. It rewards voice acting for animated feature films.

Awards for voice acting were awarded at the Annie Awards previously to 1998, but the category was a catch-all for film and television. The award as it is now was divided in two separate sub-categories for males and females in 1998, 2000, and 2001. It was called Outstanding Individual Achievement for Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production from 1998 to 2001, and Outstanding Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production from 2002 to 2004.

Annie Award for Writing in a Feature Production

The Annie Award for Writing in a Feature Production (or Annie Award for Writing in an Animated Feature Production) is an Annie Award awarded annually, except in 1997, to the best animated feature film and introduced in 1996. It reward screenwriting for animated feature films.

Awards for Best Writing were awarded in 1994 and 1995, but were also rewarding animated series. The award was formerly called Best Individual Achievement: Writing in 1996, and Outstanding Individual Achievement for Writing in an Animated Feature Production from 1998 to 2002,.

Cow and Chicken

Cow and Chicken is an American animated comedy television series created by David Feiss for Cartoon Network and the 3rd of the network's Cartoon Cartoons. It follows the surreal adventures of two funny animal siblings, Cow and Chicken. They are often antagonized by the Red Guy, a cartoon Devil who poses as various characters to scam them.

The original pilot appeared as an episode of the animation showcase series What a Cartoon!. The popularity of the original short allowed Hanna-Barbera to give it the green light for a full series, which premiered on July 15, 1997. Originally, Cow and Chicken was attached to another segment called I Am Weasel, which was later spun-off into its own half-hour series on July 22, 1997. The series was produced by Hanna-Barbera Cartoons. It was nominated for two Emmy Awards.

Dan Castellaneta

Daniel Louis Castellaneta (; born October 29, 1957) is an American actor, voice actor, comedian, producer and screenwriter, best known for his long-running role as Homer Simpson on the Fox Broadcasting Company animated sitcom The Simpsons. He also voices many other characters for the show including Abraham "Grampa" Simpson, Barney Gumble, Krusty the Clown, Sideshow Mel, Groundskeeper Willie, Mayor Quimby and Hans Moleman. Castellaneta also had roles in several other programs, including Futurama for Fox Broadcasting Company, Sibs and Darkwing Duck for ABC, The Adventures of Dynamo Duck for Fox Kids, Back to the Future: The Animated Series for CBS, Aladdin for Toon Disney, Taz-Mania for Warner Bros. Animation and in Hey Arnold! as Grandpa Phil for Nickelodeon.

In 1999, he appeared in the Christmas special Olive, the Other Reindeer, and won an Annie Award for his portrayal of the Postman. He released a comedy album I Am Not Homer, and wrote and starred in a one-person show titled Where Did Vincent van Gogh?

Ian Maxtone-Graham

Ian Howes Maxtone-Graham (born July 3, 1959) is an American television writer and producer. He has formerly written for Saturday Night Live (1992–1995) and The Simpsons (1995–2012), as well as serving as a co-executive producer and consulting producer for the latter.

Jim Reardon

Jim Reardon (born 1965) is an American animation director and storyboard consultant best known for his work on the animated TV series The Simpsons. He has directed over 30 episodes of the series and was credited as a supervising director for seasons 9 through 15. Reardon attended the Character Animation program at the California Institute of the Arts in 1982, where one of his student projects, the satirical cartoon Bring Me the Head of Charlie Brown (1986), has become a cult classic through the likes of YouTube. He was hired by John Kricfalusi as a writer on Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures and later worked on Tiny Toon Adventures. He has been described by Ralph Bakshi as "one of the best cartoon writers in the business".Reardon supervised the storyboard department and co-wrote the Pixar film WALL-E with Andrew Stanton, which was released on June 27, 2008. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for WALL-E at the 81st Academy Awards.

Joan Cusack

Joan Mary Cusack (; born October 11, 1962) is an American actress and comedian. She received Academy Award nominations for Best Supporting Actress for her roles in the romantic comedy-drama Working Girl (1988) and the romantic comedy In & Out (1997), as well as one Golden Globe nomination for her performance in the latter. She has also provided the voice of Jessie in the Toy Story franchise and Abby Mallard in Chicken Little.

Cusack was a cast member on the comedy sketch show Saturday Night Live from 1985 to 1986. She starred on the Showtime hit drama/comedy Shameless as Sheila Jackson, a role for which she has received five consecutive Primetime Emmy Award nominations, winning for the first time in 2015. She is the sister of actress Ann Cusack and actor John Cusack.

Josh Gad

Joshua Ilan Gad (born February 23, 1981) is an American actor, voice actor, comedian, and singer. He is known for voicing Olaf in Frozen, playing Elder Arnold Cunningham in the Broadway musical The Book of Mormon, and LeFou in the live-action adaptation of Disney's Beauty and the Beast. For his activity as Olaf, Gad won an Annie Award, and for his work on The Book of Mormon, he gained a Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical nomination.

He has also appeared in ER, The Daily Show, Modern Family, New Girl, Bored to Death, and Numb3rs.

Gad played Skip Gilchrist in the political sitcom 1600 Penn on NBC, and a fictionalized version of himself on FX's The Comedians, alongside Billy Crystal. His other film roles include The Rocker, The Internship, 21, Love & Other Drugs, Jobs, Pixels, The Wedding Ringer, The Angry Birds Movie and the sequel, A Dog's Purpose, Marshall, and Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express. He will star in the upcoming Netflix movie Super-Normal.

Justin Roiland

Justin Roiland (born February 21, 1980) is an American voice actor, animator, writer, producer, director and game developer. He is best known as the co-creator of Adult Swim's Rick and Morty, of which he voices the show's titular characters. He is also known for voicing the Earl of Lemongrab on Cartoon Network's Adventure Time and Blendin Blandin on Gravity Falls. He is the founder of the animation studio Justin Roiland's Solo Vanity Card Productions! and the video game studio Squanch Games.

Kung Fu Panda

Kung Fu Panda is a 2008 American computer-animated wuxia comedy film produced by DreamWorks Animation and distributed by Paramount Pictures. It was directed by John Stevenson and Mark Osborne in their directorial debuts, and stars the voices of Jack Black, Dustin Hoffman, Angelina Jolie, Ian McShane, Seth Rogen, Lucy Liu, David Cross, Randall Duk Kim, James Hong, Dan Fogler, Michael Clarke Duncan, and Jackie Chan. The film is set in a version of ancient China populated by anthropomorphic talking animals and revolves around a bumbling panda named Po, a kung fu enthusiast. When an evil kung fu warrior named Tai Lung is foretold to escape from prison, Po is unwittingly named the "Dragon Warrior", that was destined to defeat him.The film was originally conceived by Michael Lachance, a DreamWorks Animation executive. It was originally intended to be a parody of martial arts films, but director Stevenson decided instead to make an action comedy wuxia film that incorporates the hero's journey narrative archetype for the lead character. The computer animation in the film was more complex than anything DreamWorks had done before. As with most DreamWorks Animation films, Hans Zimmer (this time collaborating with John Powell) scored Kung Fu Panda. He visited China to absorb the culture and get to know the China National Symphony Orchestra as part of his preparation.

Kung Fu Panda premiered in the United States on June 6, 2008. The film received positive reviews upon release. Kung Fu Panda opened in 4,114 theaters, grossing $20.3 million on its opening day and $60.2 million on its opening weekend, resulting in the number one position at the box office. The film became DreamWorks' biggest opening for a non-sequel film, the highest grossing animated film of the year worldwide, and also had the fourth-largest opening weekend for a DreamWorks film at the American and Canadian box office, behind all three Shrek sequels. A sequel, Kung Fu Panda 2, was released on May 26, 2011, along with a television series Kung Fu Panda: Legends of Awesomeness premiering on Nickelodeon later that same year as a part of a franchise. A second sequel called Kung Fu Panda 3 was released on January 29, 2016.

Phyllis Smith

Phyllis Smith (born August 15, 1949) is an American actress and casting associate. She is best known for playing Phyllis Vance in the television series The Office and her critically acclaimed voice role as Sadness in the film Inside Out. She has a regular role on the Netflix series The OA.

Tim Allen

Timothy Alan Dick (born June 13, 1953), known professionally as Tim Allen, is an American actor and comedian. He is known for playing Tim "The Toolman" Taylor on the ABC sitcom Home Improvement (1991–1999) and Mike Baxter on the ABC sitcom Last Man Standing (2011–). He also voices Buzz Lightyear for the Toy Story franchise and played Scott Calvin and Santa Claus in The Santa Clause film trilogy (1994–2006). Allen's other films include For Richer or Poorer (1997), Jungle 2 Jungle (1997), Galaxy Quest (1999), Big Trouble (2002), Christmas with the Kranks (2004), The Shaggy Dog (2006), Wild Hogs (2007), Redbelt (2008), and Crazy on the Outside (2010).

Tom Kenny

Thomas James Kenny (born July 13, 1962) is an American actor, voice artist, and comedian. He is known for voicing the title character in the SpongeBob SquarePants TV series, video games, and films. Kenny has voiced many other characters including Heffer Wolfe in Rocko's Modern Life; the Ice King in Adventure Time; the Narrator and Mayor in The Powerpuff Girls; Carl Chryniszzswics in Johnny Bravo; Dog in CatDog; and Spyro from the Spyro the Dragon video game series. His live-action work includes the comedy variety shows The Edge and Mr. Show. Kenny has won a Daytime Emmy Award and two Annie Awards for his voice work as SpongeBob SquarePants and the Ice King.

Walter Lantz

Walter Benjamin Lantz (April 27, 1899 – March 22, 1994) was an American cartoonist, animator, film producer, director and actor best known for founding Walter Lantz Productions and creating Woody Woodpecker.

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