Annapurna I East

Annapurna I East is a subsidiary mountain of Annapurna I Main. It is 8,026 meters tall.

Annapurna Base camp with Machhapuchre view
Annapurna Base camp with Machhapuchre view
Annapurna I East
Annapurna I East is located in Nepal
Annapurna I East
Annapurna I East
Nepal
Highest point
Elevation8,026 m (26,332 ft)
Prominence106 m (348 ft) [1]
Isolation0.62 km (0.39 mi)
Parent peakAnnapurna I Main
Coordinates28°36′46″N 83°50′13″E / 28.61278°N 83.83694°ECoordinates: 28°36′46″N 83°50′13″E / 28.61278°N 83.83694°E
Geography
LocationGandaki Zone, Nepal
Parent rangeHimalayas
Climbing
First ascentOctober 28, 2007
Easiest routesnow/ice climb

References

  1. ^ "Annapurna East Pk., Nepal". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2016-03-29.
Annapurna II

Annapurna II is part of the Annapurna mountain range, and is the eastern anchor of the range. It was first climbed in 1960 by a British/Indian/Nepalese team led by J. O. M. Roberts via the West Ridge, approached from the north. The summit party comprised Richard Grant, Chris Bonington, and Sherpa Ang Nyima. In terms of elevation, isolation (distance to a higher summit, namely Annapurna I East Peak, 29.02 km or 18.03 mi) and prominence (2,437 m or 7,995 ft), Annapurna II does not rank far behind Annapurna I Main, which serves as the western anchor. It is a fully independent peak, despite the close association with Annapurna I Main which its name implies. Annapurna II is the 16th highest mountain in the world.

Yugoslavs from Slovenia repeated this ascent in 1969, also climbing Annapurna IV. Kazmir Draslar and Matija Malezic reached the summit. In 1973 Japanese shortcut the route by climbing directly up the north face between IV and V before continuing along the west ridge. Katsuyuki Kondo reached the top in a remarkable solo performance.In 1983, Tim Macartney-Snape planned and participated in an expedition to Annapurna II (7,937 m or 26,040 ft) successfully reaching the summit via the first ascent of the south spur. The descent was delayed by a blizzard and the expedition ran out of food during the last five days. They were reported missing and when the expedition eventually returned they received significant publicity.On Feb 2, 2007; Philipp Kunz, Lhakpa Wangel, Temba Nuru and Lhakpa Thinduk made the first winter ascent. The team followed the route of the first ascent from the north.

Annapurna IV

Annapurna IV is a mountain of the Annapurna range in the Himalayas. It is near Annapurna II. It was first climbed in 1955 by a German expedition led by Heinz Steinmetz via the North Face and Northwest Ridge. The summit party comprised Steinmetz, Harald Biller, and Jürgen Wellenkamp.

Annapurna Massif

Annapurna (; Sanskrit, Nepali, Newar: अनन्पूर्णा) is a massif in the Himalayas in north-central Nepal that includes one peak over 8,000 metres (26,000 ft), thirteen peaks over 7,000 metres (23,000 ft), and sixteen more over 6,000 metres (20,000 ft). The massif is 55 kilometres (34 mi) long, and is bounded by the Kali Gandaki Gorge on the west, the Marshyangdi River on the north and east, and by Pokhara Valley on the south. At the western end the massif encloses a high basin called the Annapurna Sanctuary. Annapurna I Main is the tenth highest mountain in the world at 8,091 metres (26,545 ft) above sea level, and in 1950 Maurice Herzog led a French expedition to its summit, making it the first of the eight-thousanders to be climbed.

The entire massif and surrounding area are protected within the 7,629-square-kilometre (2,946 sq mi) Annapurna Conservation Area, the first and largest conservation area in Nepal. The Annapurna Conservation Area is home to several world-class treks, including Annapurna Sanctuary and Annapurna Circuit.

Historically, the Annapurna peaks are among the world's most dangerous mountains to climb, although in more recent history, using only figures from 1990 and after, Kangchenjunga has a higher fatality rate. By March 2012, there had been 191 summit ascents of Annapurna I Main, and 61 climbing fatalities on the mountain. This fatality-to-summit ratio (1:3.1, or 32%) is the highest of any of the eight-thousanders. In particular, the ascent via the south face is considered, by some, the most difficult of all climbs. In October 2014, at least 43 people were killed as a result of snowstorms and avalanches on and around Annapurna, in Nepal's worst ever trekking disaster.

Annapurna South

Annapurna South, also called Annapurna Dakshin or Moditse, is a mountain in the Annapurna Himal range of the Himalayas, and the 101st-highest mountain in the world. It was first ascended in 1964, and is 7,219 metres (23,684 ft) tall. The nearby mountain Hiunchuli is in fact an extension of Annapurna South.

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