Anna the Prophetess

Anna (Hebrew: חַנָּה‎, Ancient Greek: Ἄννα) or Anna the Prophetess is a woman mentioned in the Gospel of Luke. According to that Gospel, she was an elderly woman of the Tribe of Asher who prophesied about Jesus at the Temple of Jerusalem. She appears in Luke 2:36–38 during the presentation of Jesus at the Temple.

Anna
Giotto - Scrovegni - -19- - Presentation at the Temple
Anna at the presentation of Jesus (right), from Giotto, Chapel of Scrovegni.
Information
TitleProphetess
FamilyPhanuel (father)
RelativesTribe of Asher

New Testament

The passage mentioning Anna is as follows:

Luke 2:36–38 There was also a prophet, Anna, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher. She was very old; she had lived with her husband seven years after her marriage, and then was a widow until she was eighty-four.[*] She never left the temple but worshiped night and day, fasting and praying. Coming up to them at that very moment, she gave thanks to God and spoke about the child to all who were looking forward to the redemption of Jerusalem.

From these three verses in Luke, the following is known of Anna:

Luke describes Anna as "very old". Many Bibles and older commentaries state that she was 84 years old.[1][2]

The Greek text states καὶ αὐτὴ χήρα ὡς ἐτῶν ὀγδοηκοντατεσσάρων, generally translated as "she was a widow of eighty four years".[3] The passage is ambiguous: it could mean that she was 84 years old, or that she had been a widow for 84 years.[4][5] Some scholars consider the latter to be the more likely option.[6] On this option, she could not have married younger than about age 14, and so she would have been at least 14 + 7 + 84 = 105 years old.[7]

Church traditions and veneration

The Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox Church commemorate Anna as a saint, Anna the Prophetess. The Eastern Orthodox Church considers Anna and Simeon the God-Receiver as the last prophets of Old Testament and observes their feast on February 3/February 16 as the synaxis (afterfeast) following the Presentation of Christ, which Orthodox tradition calls "The Meeting of Our Lord and God and Savior, Jesus Christ".[8] Along with Simeon, the prophetess Anna is commemorated on February 3 in the Byzantine rite of the Catholic Church.[9]

Also her figure is drawn in the icons of the Presentation of Christ, together with the Holy Child and the Virgin Mary, Joseph and Simeon the God-Receiver. Orthodox tradition considers that Christ met his people, Israel, in the persons of those two, Simeon and Anna.[10]

References

  1. ^ Cyclopædia of Biblical, theological, and ecclesiastical literature Vol 1 p.235. John McClintock,James Strong. Retrieved 2010-01-16.
  2. ^ Easton's Dictionary
  3. ^ UBS Greek NT
  4. ^ Twelve Extraordinary Women: How God Shaped Women of the Bible, and ... – Page 136 John MacArthur – 2008 "The Greek text is ambiguous as to her exact age. (“This woman was a widow of about eighty-four years.”) It might mean literally that she had been a widow for eighty-four years. Assuming she married very young (remember, thirteen was a ..."
  5. ^ Green, Joel B., The Gospel of Luke, Eerdmans, 1997, ISBN 0-8028-2315-7, p. 151.
  6. ^ Marshall, I. Howard, The Gospel of Luke: A commentary on the Greek text, Eerdmans, 1978, ISBN 0-8028-3512-0, p. 123.
  7. ^ Elliott, J.K., "Anna's Age (Luke 2:36–37)," Novum Testamentum, Vol. 30, Fasc. 2 (Apr., 1988), pp. 100–102.
  8. ^ "Afterfeast of the Meeting of our Lord in the Temple". Orthodox Church of America. Archived from the original on 30 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-05.
  9. ^ February 3 is the feast day of the elder Simeon and the prophetess Anna Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh)
  10. ^ "The Meeting of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ in the Temple". Orthodox Church of America. Archived from the original on 30 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-05.

External links

Aeneas (biblical figure)

Aeneas is a character in the New Testament. According to Acts 9:32-33, he lived in Lydda, and had been a cripple for eight years. When Peter said to him, "Jesus Christ heals you. Get up and roll up your mat," he was healed and got up.

F. F. Bruce suggests that Aeneas was "one of the local Christian group, though this is not expressly stated." According to David J. Williams, there is some ambiguity in the Greek text of verse 34, which contains a phrase normally translated as "make thy bed". The text would literally be rendered as Peter telling Aeneas to "spread for himself", which might not refer to his bedding, but something else he had been unable to do. Williams suggests it could, for example, mean "Get yourself something to eat".The account of Aeneas being healed is followed by an account of the raising of Dorcas.

Archippus

Archippus (; Ancient Greek: Ἅρχιππος, "master of the horse") was an early Christian believer mentioned briefly in the New Testament epistles of Philemon and Colossians.

Blastus

According to the Bible, Blastus was the chamberlain of Herod Agrippa (Acts 12:20), a mediator for the Sidonians and Tyrians, and was believed to be involved in the events that led to Herod's death.

Demetrius (biblical figure)

The name Demetrius occurs in two places in the Bible, both in the New Testament:

a Diana-worshipping silversmith who incited a riot against the Apostle Paul.

a disciple commended in 3 John 1:12. Possibly the bearer of the letters of 1, 2 and 3 John, Demetrius is commended to the early Christian leader Gaius (3 John 1:11) as one who upholds the truth of the Gospel, and as such should be welcomed and provided for.

Epaphras

Epaphras (Greek: Ἐπαφράς) was an observer of the Apostle Paul mentioned twice in the New Testament epistle of Colossians and once in the New Testament letter to Philemon. In the first instance he is described as a "fellow servant" (Colossians 1:7) of Paul in his ministry. At the end of the same letter to the Church in Colossae, it is noted that Epaphras is "one of them" and that he sends "greetings" (Colossians 4:12) from his current location to the recipients of the letter. There is a similar refrain in Paul's letter to Philemon, where a person of the same name passes on his "greetings" to Philemon (Philemon 23). Douglas Moo, in his commentary about Colossians, writes this about Epaphras: "Little is known about him, though we can infer that he was a native of Colossae and that he was perhaps converted by Paul himself during the apostle's ministry in Ephesus. The mention of a co-worker at this point in a Pauline epistle is unusual, and the strength of Paul's endorsement of him is also striking (note also 4:12-13)."

Eunice (biblical figure)

According to the New Testament, Eunice was the mother of Timothy. Born into the Jewish faith, she and her mother Lois accepted Christianity.

She is mentioned only in 2 Timothy 1:5, where the author writes to Timothy, "I am reminded of your sincere faith, a faith that dwelt first in your grandmother Lois and your mother Eunice and now, I am sure, dwells in you as well." (ESV) Many commentators have also connected Eunice to 2 Tim. 3:15, where Timothy is reminded "how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings". (ESV) Albert Barnes, for example, says, "The mother of Timothy was a pious Hebrewess, and regarded it as one of the duties of her religion to train her son in the careful knowledge of the word of God."

Hannah

Hannah or Hanna may refer to:

Hannah (name), a given name (including a list of persons with the name)

Hannah (surname), a family name (including a list of persons with the name)

Hannah (biblical figure), the mother of Samuel

Woman with seven sons, a Jewish martyr in Maccabees, usually named Hannah

Anna the Prophetess, the prophetess in Gospel of Luke, Hannah in some translations.

Mary, mother of John Mark

Mary, mother of John Mark is mentioned in the Acts 12:12, which says that, after his escape from prison, Peter went to her house:

When he realized this, he went to the house of Mary, the mother of John whose other name was Mark, where many were gathered together and were praying.

This seems to be the only mention of her in the Bible.

The question whether her son John Mark can be identified with others called Mark or John in the New Testament is discussed in the article about him. Greek scholars reject his identification with Mark the Evangelist and have a separate feast for John Mark in their synaxarion. Catholic scholars are divided on this issue.

Nathanael (follower of Jesus)

Nathanael (Hebrew נתנאל, "God has given") of Cana in Galilee was a follower or disciple of Jesus, mentioned only in the Gospel of John in Chapters 1 and 21.

Nicanor the Deacon

Nicanor (; Greek: Nικάνωρ Nikā́nōr) was one of the Seven Deacons. He was martyred in 76.

Nymphas

Nymphas meaning nymph. A man or a woman, depending on accenting of the Greek text, in the New Testament saluted by Paul of Tarsus in his Epistle to the Colossians as a member of the church of Laodicea (Colossians 4:15). Possibly a contraction of Nymphodorus. The church met in his or her house.

Olympas

Olympas (Greek: Ὀλυμπᾶς, meaning "heavenly") was a Roman Christian whom Paul of Tarsus saluted (Romans 16:15) in around 65 AD.

Olympas is regarded in the Orthodox Church as being one of the Seventy disciples. His feast day is November 10.

Parmenas

Parmenas was one of the Seven Deacons. He is believed to have preached the gospel in Asia Minor. Parmenas suffered martyrdom in 98, under the persecution of Trajan.Christian tradition identifies him as the Bishop of Soli. Some take this to be Soli, Cyprus, while others interpret it as Soli, Cilicia.

Phanuel

Phanuel (Greek: Φανουήλ Phanouēl) or Penuel (Hebrew: פְּנוּאֵל‎ Pənū’êl) was the father of Anna the prophetess. He is mentioned once only in the New Testament, in Luke 2:36. He was a member of the Tribe of Asher and his name means "Face of God".

Theologian John Gill supposed that "this man might be a person of some note, or he may be mentioned for the sake of his name, which signifies the face of God, and is the name Jacob gave to a certain place where he had seen God face to face" (Genesis 32:30). As Anna was herself 'very old', it can be assumed that Phanuel was not still alive at the time of Anna's encounter with the child Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:38).

Philetus (biblical figure)

Philetus (fl. 50–65) was an early Christian mentioned by Paul, who warns Timothy against him as well as against his associate in error, Hymenaeus.

Silvanus of the Seventy

Silvanus is mentioned in the New Testament (Acts, various letters of Paul, and 1 Peter) as a co-writer or transcriber of some of these works. He later became Bishop of Thessalonika and died a martyr.In Eastern Orthodox tradition he is assumed to be one of the Seventy Apostles, those followers of Jesus sent out by him in Luke 10.

Silvanus is probably the same person as Silas, also mentioned in various places in the New Testament.

Simeon (Gospel of Luke)

Simeon (Simeon the God-receiver) at the Temple is the "just and devout" man of Jerusalem who, according to Luke 2:25–35, met Mary, Joseph, and Jesus as they entered the Temple to fulfill the requirements of the Law of Moses on the 40th day from Jesus' birth at the presentation of Jesus at the Temple.

According to the Biblical account, Simeon had been visited by the Holy Spirit and told that he would not die until he had seen the Lord's Christ. On taking Jesus into his arms he uttered a prayer, which is still used liturgically as the Latin Nunc dimittis in many Christian churches, and gave a prophecy alluding to the crucifixion.

In some Christian traditions, this meeting is commemorated on February 2 as Candlemas, or more formally, the Presentation of the Lord, the Meeting of the Lord, or the Purification of the Virgin. His prophecy is used in the context of Our Lady of Sorrows. Simeon is venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox traditions. His feast day is October 8 in the revised Martyrology of the Roman Catholic Church.

Simeon Niger

Simeon Niger is a person in the Book of Acts in the New Testament. He is mentioned in Acts 13:1 as being one of the "prophets and teachers" in the church of Antioch:

In the church at Antioch there were prophets and teachers: Barnabas, Simeon called Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, Manaen (who had been brought up with Herod the tetrarch) and Saul.

Sopater

Sopater [4] (Greek: Σώπατρος, Sṓpatros) was the son of Pyrhus,[5] a man from the city of Berea, mentioned in Acts 20:4. Sopater and others (Aristarchus and Secundus of the Thessalonians, and Gaius of Derbe, and Timothy, and Tychicus and Trophimus of Asia) accompanied Paul out of Macedonia after a group of Jews began to plot against Paul, and then sailed from Philippi to Alexandria Troas where they met Paul who had gone by land.

It is commonly accepted that Sopater was the kinsman of Paul noted in Romans 16:21. as Sosipater.[6] although some writers think the words "the son of Pyrrhus" were added to distinguish Sopater from Sosipater.Sosipater is honored as Saint Sosipater by the Eastern Orthodox Church with a feast day on 29 April.

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See also

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