Animation department

Animation departments (or animation production departments) are the teams within a film studio that work on various aspects of animation such as storyboarding or 3D modeling. It can refer to a single department that handles animation as a whole or to multiple departments that handle specific tasks. It can also refer to a college department.

Departments [1]

Retake department - looks for mistakes in animation and has it redone. An animator will check all frames one by one in order to ensure they flow smoothly.

Compositing department - handles special effects such as chroma keying and other aspects of compositing

Inbetweening department - creates inbetweens, the frames that go between key frames (the main points of action in a scene) that make up the bulk of an animation

Editing department - compiles and edits the animation (either in part or in its entirety) so that it is consistent

Background department - draws the background art for scenes

Storyboard department - plans out the animation using sketches of its main points (a storyboard)

Scanning department - converts traditionally-drawn media to digital and ensures frames aren't lost in the process

Sound effects and musical scoring department - creates soundtracks and sound effects, such as with choirs, instruments, and Foley.

Layout department - stages scenes and creates plans for how a scene should look

See also

References

  1. ^ Animation Job Roles, Creative Skillset
Brandon Vietti

Brandon Vietti (born in Fresno, California in 1974) is an American animator, director, and producer. Vietti developed and co-produces the animated television show Young Justice with Greg Weisman. He has also worked on various other animation projects for DC Comics and Warner Bros. Animation. He worked as a director for The Batman and Batman: The Brave and the Bold, directing every third episode. For his work on The Batman he won an Emmy Award in 2006. He directed the animated film Lego DC Comics Super Heroes: Justice League vs. Bizarro League.

Cal Dalton

Cal Dalton (1908–1974) was an animator and cartoon director at Warner Bros. Cartoons.

Christopher Knights

Christopher Knights is an English voice actor, film editor and camera operator best known for providing the voice of Private the Penguin in Madagascar. He worked on several DreamWorks films Shrek, Shrek 2, Shrek the Third and Shrek 4-D. He started his filming career at Amblimation studios and worked on We're Back! A Dinosaur's Story and Balto. When he joined DreamWorks he not only started his editing career but also his acting career. He worked on the Shrek series as an associate editor and voice of the Three Blind Mice and Thelonious, Lord Farquad's Henchman. He worked many times with another English cameraman and voice actor, Simon J. Smith.

Disney Renaissance

The Disney Renaissance refers to the decade from 1989 to 1999 during which Walt Disney Animation Studios returned to producing critically and commercially successful animated films that were mostly based on well-known stories, much like the studio did during the era of Walt Disney during the 1930s, '40s, and '50s. The resurgence allowed Disney's animated films to become powerhouse successes at the domestic and foreign box office; making much more profit than most of the other Disney films of the past eras.The animated films released by Disney during this period include The Little Mermaid (1989), The Rescuers Down Under (1990), Beauty and the Beast (1991), Aladdin (1992), The Lion King (1994), Pocahontas (1995), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996), Hercules (1997), Mulan (1998), and Tarzan (1999).

Firehouse Five Plus Two

The Firehouse Five Plus Two was a Dixieland jazz band, popular in the 1950s, consisting of members of the Disney animation department.

George and Rosemary

George and Rosemary is a 1987 animated short co-directed by Alison Snowden and David Fine, about two "golden agers" who prove that passion is not exclusively for the young. Produced by Eunice Macaulay for the National Film Board of Canada, the film received the Genie Award for Best Short Film and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film at the 60th Academy Awards. It was also included in the Animation Show of Shows. The film was narrated by Cec Linder.

Guido Seeber

Guido Seeber (22 June 1879 in Chemnitz – 2 July 1940 in Berlin) was a German cinematographer and pioneer of early cinema.

Seeber's father, Clemens, was a photographer and therefore Seeber had experience with photography from an early age. In the summer of 1896, he saw the first films of the Lumière Brothers and became fascinated by this new technology. He bought a film camera and devoted himself to the development of cinematography and of sound films.

In 1908 he became technical manager of the film company Deutsche Bioscop and in 1909 directed his first film. His pioneering work as a cinematographer from this time on laid the foundations which other cameramen of German silent film such as Karl Freund, Fritz Arno Wagner and Carl Hoffmann were able to build.

In addition to his technical talents with the camera (he developed several special effects techniques), his use of perspective and skillful contrasts between light and dark are noteworthy. His main collaborators were the directors Urban Gad, Lupu Pick, Georg Wilhelm Pabst und Paul Wegener and among his most important accomplishments are the shots of the Doppelgänger in Wegener's Der Student von Prag (The Student of Prague) of 1913 and the moving camera shots in the films of Lupu Pick, particularly Sylvester (1923), which can be seen as anticipating the so-called "unchained camera" of Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau's The Last Laugh (1924).

Seeber created several animated works, including an advertisement entitle Kipho or Du musst zur Kipho (You Must Go to Kino-Photo) for a film and photography exhibition in Berlin in 1925.Seeber continued to work into the sound era, but his work from this period is less significant. He had suffered a stroke in 1932 and after this he largely retired from active camera operation. However, he continued to be involved in the film industry, taking over the management of UFA's animation department in 1935 and publishing several books for amateur filmmakers.

Ion Popescu-Gopo

Ion Popescu-Gopo (Romanian pronunciation: [iˈon poˈpesku ˈɡopo]; 1 May 1923, Roești, Vâlcea – 28 November 1989, Bucharest) was a Romanian graphic artist and animator, but also writer, movie director and actor born in Bucharest, Romania. He was a prominent personality in the Romanian cinematography and the founder of the modern Romanian cartoon school. He was, together with Liviu Ciulei and Mirel Ilieşiu one of the few Romanian film artists who won an award at Cannes in the 20th century. His film "Scurtă Istorie" (A Brief History) won the Short Film Palme d'Or for best short film in 1957. His 1965 film The White Moor was entered into the 4th Moscow International Film Festival where he won the award for Best Director. In 1969 he was a member of the jury at the 6th Moscow International Film Festival. In 1977 he was a member of the jury at the 10th Moscow International Film Festival. In 1983 he was a member of the jury at the 13th Moscow International Film Festival.Ion Popescu-Gopo attended (but never graduated from) the Academy of Fine Arts in Bucharest. He also attended animation courses in Moscow. He made Maria, Mirabela which is a Romanian-Russian co-production.

His career started as a designer and cartoonist in 1939, publishing caricatures and editorial cartoons in newspapers. 1949 brought his debut in the film industry with "Punguţa cu doi bani" (Bag with two coins). Since 1950 he started working for Studioul Cinematografic Bucureşti (Cinematographic Studio Bucharest) in the animation department, that later broke into a separate animation studio, Animafilm.

His most known cartoon character is a little black and white man sometimes referred to as "Gopo's Little Man" after his creator. Later in his life Popescu-Gopo confessed that he tried to start an "anti-Disney rebellion". Unable to surpass Disney's animation characters in color and beauty, Popescu-Gopo tried to be more profound in message and substance and simplify the form and techniques used. Unlike Disney's cartoon characters, Popescu-Gopo's cartoon characters were black and white, designed in simple lines.

List of Disney theatrical animated features

This list of theatrical animated feature films consists of animated films produced or released by The Walt Disney Studios, the film division of The Walt Disney Company.

The Walt Disney Studios releases films from Disney-owned and non-Disney owned animation studios. Most films listed below are from Walt Disney Animation Studios which began as the feature animation department of Walt Disney Productions, producing its first feature-length animated film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs in 1937 and as of 2018 has produced a total of 57 feature films. Beginning with Toy Story in 1995, The Walt Disney Studios also released animated films by Pixar Animation Studios, which Disney acquired in 2006. On March 20, 2019, The Walt Disney Studios acquired Blue Sky Studios as a third major animation studio upon its acquisition of 21st Century Fox assets, as well as 20th Century Fox Animation which operates as a label within 20th Century Fox.

Other studio units have also released films theatrically, namely Walt Disney Television Animation's Disney MovieToons/Video Premiere unit (now DisneyToon Studios) and the studio's distribution unit, which acquires film rights from outside animation studios to release films under the Walt Disney Pictures, Touchstone Pictures, 20th Century Fox or previously owned Miramax film labels. In 1996, The Walt Disney Studios signed a deal with Tokuma Shoten for distribution rights to the theatrical works of Studio Ghibli worldwide (excluding Asia except for Japan and Taiwan and excluding Grave of the Fireflies which was not published by Tokuma), including what then was the most recent film, Princess Mononoke. The deal later grew to include DVD rights and newer Ghibli movies; the English language Disney release of Spirited Away won the 2002 Academy Award for Best Animated Feature. Studio Ghibli remains wholly independent of Disney and maintains strict creative control over the handling of the foreign language localization Disney produces. All of the theatrical Ghibli back catalog originally included in the deal have since been released to DVD in North America and several other countries. Other studios globally have released films through Walt Disney Pictures which maintains distribution rights in certain territories.

List of Pixar shorts

Beginning with Pixar's second film A Bug's Life, all subsequent Pixar feature films, except Coco, have been shown in theaters along with a Pixar-created original short film, known as a "short." Other Pixar shorts, released only on home media, were created to showcase what Pixar's technologically or cinematica capabilities, or on commission for clients.

Pixar began producing shorts since the 1980s. The first shorts were made while Pixar was still a computer hardware company, when John Lasseter was the only professional animator in the company's small animation department. Starting with Geri's Game, after Pixar had converted into an animation studio, all later shorts have been produced with a larger crew and budget.

In 1991, Pixar made four CGI shorts produced for the TV series Sesame Street. The shorts illustrates different weights and directions starring Luxo Jr. and Luxo — Light & Heavy (1990), Surprise (1991), Up and Down (1993), and Front and Back (1994).Also, beginning with A Bug's Life, Pixar has created extra content for each of their films that is not part of the main story. For their early theatrical releases, this content was in the form of outtakes and appeared as part of the film's credits. For each of their films, this content was a short made exclusively for the DVD release of the film.

MTV Animation

MTV Animation is the animation department of the television network MTV.

Mac Guff

Mac Guff (also known as Mac Guff Ligne) is a French visual effects company based in both Los Angeles, USA and Paris, France, where it is headquartered. Mac Guff specializes in the creation of computer-generated imagery for commercials, music videos and feature films. 270 graphic designers, VFX supervisors and producers, computer engineers and administrators are usually working on 100+ million files (for Despicable Me). In mid-2011, the company was split in two, and the animation department has been acquired by Illumination Entertainment (Universal Studios). The new company is named "Illumination Mac Guff" and has capital worth 3.2 million euros.

Normand Roger

Normand Roger (born 1949 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian composer, sound editor and sound designer. He is particularly known for his work as a composer of soundtracks for animated films, having composed more than 200 such works since 1970. He has also worked on the creation of music for documentaries, feature films, television dramas, children's series, commercials, and new technologies with 3D and virtual reality. He is the composer of many original soundtracks for Frédéric Back, Paul Driessen, Michaël Dudok de Wit, Caroline Leaf and Aleksandr Petrov. Thirteen of his works have been nominated for Academy Awards, of which six have won. He also notably wrote the theme for the PBS's Mystery!. Roger lectures throughout the world on music and sound for animation.Roger has spent nearly 40 years creating soundtracks for the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) in his hometown of Montreal, after first being hired for its animation department at the age of 22. His extensive NFB credits include Every Child and The Sand Castle, both winners of the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film.He is married to animation film director and producer Marcy Page, whom he met while working with on her film, Paradisia.

Peter Schneider (film executive)

Peter Schneider is an American film and theatrical producer, notable as the first president of Walt Disney Feature Animation for The Walt Disney Company from 1985 to 1999, and was responsible for helping to turn the feature animation department around and creating some of the most critically acclaimed and highest grossing animated features that Disney released. These films included Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), The Little Mermaid (1989), Beauty and the Beast (1991, the first animated feature to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture), Aladdin (1992), and The Lion King (1994, the highest domestic grossing animated film of all time until 2003).

He was promoted to studio chief in 1999. In 2001, Schneider left Disney to form his own theater production company. His first major production, developed in association with Michael Reno, was Sister Act which opened at the London Palladium in 2009. Peter graduated from Purdue University in 1972 with a theater degree.Along with producer Don Hahn, Schneider produced a documentary entitled Waking Sleeping Beauty in 2009, which focused on the revival of Disney animation during the 1980s and early 1990s.

Schneider is also a world champion bridge player, having won the World Transnational Open Teams Championship in 2005. He possesses the title of World Bridge Federation (WBF) World Life Master (WLM).

Preston Blair

Preston Blair (October 24, 1908 – April 19, 1995) was an American character animator, most noted for his work at Walt Disney Productions and the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer animation department.

A native of Redlands, California, Blair began his animation career in the early 1930s at the Universal studio under Walter Lantz and Bill Nolan. He later moved over to Charles Mintz's Screen Gems studio, and in the late 1930s moved over to the Disney studio. At Disney, Blair animated cartoon short subjects, Mickey Mouse scenes in "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" section of Fantasia, and the hippo-alligator dance in Fantasia's "Dance of the Hours" sequence. He also did some work on Walt Disney's Pinocchio and Bambi.

Blair left Disney after the 1941 Disney animator's strike, and was hired to work for Tex Avery's unit at MGM. There, he became particularly noted for animating the titular female character in Red Hot Riding Hood. "Red" later re-appeared in more Avery cartoons, including Swing Shift Cinderella, Little Rural Riding Hood, Uncle Tom's Cabana and the Droopy cartoons The Shooting of Dan McGoo and Wild and Woolfy, with animation by Blair. In the late 1940s, Blair teamed with Avery animator Michael Lah to direct several Barney Bear cartoons.

Blair continued his career in animation into the 1960s, working on The Flintstones at Hanna-Barbera. He is most known, however, as an author of animation instructional books for Walter Foster Publishing. His first book, Animation, was published in 1948 and originally included images of the famous MGM & Disney cartoon characters he had animated, who were redrawn to obscure their origins in the second edition of the book. Blair would write many more animation how-to texts over the next forty years, culminating with 1994's Cartoon Animation, a 224-page book which compiles most of the content from all of his books.

Preston Blair was the brother of artist Lee Everett Blair [1] and the brother-in-law of artist and designer Mary Blair. He died on April 19, 1995.

Ralph Zondag

Ralph Zondag is a storyboard artist and animation director.

Steve Segal

Steve Segal (born in Richmond, Virginia in 1949) is an American animator and filmmaker who collaborated with Phil Trumbo in the production of the cult classic Futuropolis, an avant garde space-travel film parody which started in the mid-1970s as a nine-minute short but has been growing in size and impact ever since. He teaches animation at the California College of the Arts and has also been a professor in the animation department

at Academy of Art University, San Francisco, California.

He received his BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1972.

Wes Takahashi

Wes Ford Takahashi is an American visual effects animator and animation supervisor who has worked for motion picture visual effects company Industrial Light & Magic. He is known for his special effects work on numerous films; his efforts include animating the time travel sequences for all three films in the Back to the Future trilogy, as well as animating the "boy on the moon" in the DreamWorks logo. He is the former head of ILM's animation department.

Winston Sharples

Winston Singleton Sharples (March 1, 1909 – April 3, 1978) was an American composer known for his work with animated short subjects, especially those created by the animation department at Paramount Pictures. In his 35-year career, Sharples scored more than 700 cartoons for Paramount and Famous Studios, and composed music for two Frank Buck films, Wild Cargo (1934) and Fang and Claw (1935).

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