Angolan swallow

The Angolan swallow (Hirundo angolensis) is a species of swallow that is native to the Afrotropics.

Angolan swallow
Hirundo angolensis, Munhango, Birding Weto, a
Hirundo angolensis MHNT
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Hirundinidae
Genus: Hirundo
Species:
H. angolensis
Binomial name
Hirundo angolensis

Description

They measure 15 cm and weigh 16 to 19 g. The plumage of the forehead, throat and upper breast is coloured deep rufous-chestnut. The crown and upperparts are a shiny steel-blue. Flight and tail feathers are black, the latter with large white windows.[2]

Behaviour

They frequent a variety of open habitats up to the fringes of forest, whether altered by man or natural. Their diet consists of a variety of flying insects. They may forage alone or in flocks, and emit a weak twittering. Their breeding season and abundance depends much on their region of residence, and a few undertake migrations.[2]

Range

It is found in Angola, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.

Relationships

It has been considered conspecific with the Red-chested swallow, but is generally taken as a full species in a species complex that includes Barn, Red-chested, Pacific, Welcome, White-throated and Ethiopian swallows.[3]

Subspecies

There are two subspecies, but intermediate forms occur:[3]

  • H. a. angolensis – type from Huíla Province, Angola
  • H. a. arcticincta Sharpe, 1891[4] – East Africa
Hirundo angolensis 1894
nominate subsp.
Hirundo angolensis, arcticincta race 1894
subsp. arcticincta
deeper tail-fork,
paler belly plumage

References

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Hirundo angolensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.
  2. ^ a b Turner, A. "Angolan Swallow (Hirundo angolensis)". Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. Retrieved 9 April 2016.
  3. ^ a b "Angolan Swallow (Hirundo angolensis) - HBW 9, p. 666". The Internet Bird Collection (IBC). Retrieved 9 April 2016.
  4. ^ "Angola Swallow (arcticincta)". avibase. Retrieved 9 April 2016.
African swallow

Although a well-known plot point in the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the term "African swallow" is highly ambiguous; there are many African birds in the swallow family and called "swallow":

Genus Cecropis, mud-nest building swallows:

Lesser striped swallow, Cecropis abyssinica

Greater striped swallow, Cecropis cucullata

Red-rumped swallow, Cecropis daurica (range extends beyond Africa)

West African swallow, Cecropis domicella

Red-breasted swallow, Cecropis semirufa

Mosque swallow, Cecropis senegalensis

Genus Hirundo open-cup nesting swallows:

Ethiopian swallow, Hirundo aethiopica

White-throated swallow, Hirundo albigularis

Angolan swallow, Hirundo angolensis

Blue swallow, Hirundo atrocaerulea

Pearl-breasted swallow, Hirundo dimidiata

Pied-winged swallow, Hirundo leucosoma

Red-chested swallow, Hirundo lucida

White-tailed swallow, Hirundo megaensis

white-bibbed swallow, Hirundo nigrita

Black-and-rufous swallow, Hirundo nigrorufa

Barn swallow, Hirundo rustica (range extends beyond Africa, this is also the European swallow)

Wire-tailed swallow, Hirundo smithii smithii

Genus Petrochelidon, cliff nesting swallows:

Forest swallow, Petrochelidon fuliginosa

Preuss's cliff swallow, Petrochelidon preussi

Red-throated cliff swallow, Petrochelidon rufigula

South African cliff swallow, Petrochelidon spilodera

Genus Pseudhirundo:

Grey-rumped swallow, Pseudhirundo griseopygaThere are many other African birds in the swallow family Hirundinidae, but not called swallows, such as the Saw-wings (genus Psalidoprocne, also called rough-winged swallows), and numerous martins, such as the African river martin (Pseudochelidon eurystomina).

Hirundo

The bird genus Hirundo is a group of passerines in the family Hirundinidae (swallows and martins). The genus name is Latin for a swallow. These are the typical swallows, including the widespread barn swallow. Many of this group have blue backs, red on the face and sometimes the rump or nape, and whitish or rufous underparts. With fifteen species this genus is the largest in its family.

List of birds of Angola

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Angola. The avifauna of Angola include a total of 983 species, of which fourteen are endemic, one has been introduced by humans and four are rare or accidental. Twenty species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Angola.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Angola

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Angola

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Angola as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Burundi

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Burundi. The avifauna of Burundi include a total of 690 species, of which 1 has been introduced by humans and 2 are rare or accidental. 7 species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Burundi.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Burundi

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Burundi as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Kenya

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Kenya. The avifauna of Kenya include a total of 1105 species, of which eight are endemic, 75 are accidental, and two have been introduced by humans. An additional six species are considered "uncertain" (see below) and are not included in the count.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 2018 edition. Unless otherwise noted, the list is that of the African Bird Club's Checklist of the Birds of Kenya. The club will be referred to as ABC throughout. Differences in common and scientific names between the Clements taxonomy and that of the ABC are frequent but are seldom noted here.

The following tags highlight several categories of occurrence other than regular migrants and non-endemic residents. The "A", "I", and "U" tags follow the ABC list. The "E" tags are based on Clements, because the ABC does not note endemics. The notes of population status are from the Avibase Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Kenya (also called a vagrant)

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Kenya

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Kenya as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(U) Uncertain - a species recorded but not confirmed in Kenya

List of birds of Malawi

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Malawi. The avifauna of Malawi include a total of 650 species, of which one has been introduced by humans and thirty-one are rare or accidental. Ten species are globally threatened. Several bird subspecies are endemic to Malawi. One of these, the yellow-throated apalis, is treated as a full endemic species by some authors. Several species such as the Thyolo alethe are near-endemic to Malawi with only a restricted range outside the country.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Malawi.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories, but not all species fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species.

(A) Accidental - a rarely occurring species with no more than about five records in Malawi

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Malawi as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in Malawi although populations exist elsewhere

List of birds of Rwanda

This is a list of bird species recorded in Rwanda. The avifauna of Rwanda include a total of 703 confirmed species. 510 resident species. 183 visiting species (including vagrants and migrants). Ten species are considered extirpated in Rwanda.This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) largely follows The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 2018 update. However, in an attempt to make the list more accessible to a wide range of users several things have been done.

Scientific names follow those used in the linked articles.

Where there is an alternative common name (that may be used more frequently in the UK and East Africa) this is included after the Clements' common name.

Where subspecies or an eBird preferred taxon is available this is included e.g. yellow wagtail, Motacilla flava.

The species listed here are the same as used on the eBird in Rwanda.The following tags have been used to highlight several categories, but not all species fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Rwanda, where known the number of sightings for rare records is indicated.

(Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in Rwanda although populations exist elsewhere

List of birds of Tanzania

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Tanzania. The avifauna of Tanzania include a total of 1050 species, of which 26 are endemic, 30 are accidental, and two have been introduced by humans. An additional four species are considered "uncertain" (see below) and are not included in the count.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 2018 edition. Unless otherwise noted, the list is that of the African Bird Club's Checklist of the Birds of Tanzania. The Club will be referred to as ABC throughout. Differences in common and scientific names between the Clements taxonomy and that of the ABC are frequent but are seldom noted here.

The following tags highlight several categories of occurrence other than regular migrants and non-endemic residents. The "A", "I", and "U" tags follow the ABC list. The "E" tags are based on Clements, because the ABC does not note endemics. The notes of population status are from the Avibase Bird Checklists of the World.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Tanzania (also called a vagrant)

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Tanzania

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Tanzania as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(U) Uncertain - a species recorded but not confirmed in Tanzania

List of birds of Zambia

This is a list of bird species recorded in Zambia. The avifauna of Zambia include a total of 779 species, of which one is endemic, one has been introduced by humans and four are rare or accidental. Eleven species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Zambia.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Zambia

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Zambia

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Zambia as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of least concern birds

As of May 2019, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 8405 least concern avian species. 76% of all evaluated avian species are listed as least concern.

No subpopulations of birds have been evaluated by the IUCN.

This is a complete list of least concern avian species evaluated by the IUCN. Where possible common names for taxa are given while links point to the scientific name used by the IUCN.

List of national association football teams by nickname

The following is a list of nicknames of national association football teams.

Swallow

The swallows, martins and saw-wings, or Hirundinidae, are a family of passerine birds found around the world on all continents, including occasionally in Antarctica. Highly adapted to aerial feeding, they have a distinctive appearance. The term Swallow is used colloquially in Europe as a synonym for the barn swallow. There are around 90 species of Hirundinidae, divided into 19 genera, with the greatest diversity found in Africa, which is also thought to be where they evolved as hole-nesters. They also occur on a number of oceanic islands. A number of European and North American species are long-distance migrants; by contrast, the West and South African swallows are non-migratory.

This family comprises two subfamilies: Pseudochelidoninae (the river martins of the genus Pseudochelidon) and Hirundininae (all other swallows, martins and saw-wings). Within the Old World, the name martin tends to be used for the squarer-tailed species, and the name swallow for the more fork-tailed species; however, there is no scientific distinction between these two groups. Within the New World, "martin" is reserved for members of the genus Progne. (These two systems are responsible for the sand martin being called "bank swallow" in the New World.)

Virunga National Park

Virunga National Park is a national park in the Albertine Rift Valley in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It was created in 1925 and is among the first protected areas in Africa. In altitude, it ranges from 680 m (2,230 ft) in the Semliki River valley to 5,109 m (16,762 ft) in the Rwenzori Mountains. From north to south it extends about 300 km (190 mi), largely along the international borders with Uganda and Rwanda in the east.

It covers an area of 8,090 km2 (3,120 sq mi) and is listed in the List of World Heritage in Danger since 1994.Two active volcanoes are located in the park, Mount Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira.

They significantly shaped the national park's diverse habitats and wildlife. More than 3,000 faunal and floral species were recorded, of which more than 300 are endemic to the Albertine Rift including eastern gorilla (Gorilla beringei) and golden monkey (Cercopithecus kandti).

Swallows (family: Hirundinidae)

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