Anglican Diocese of Southwark

The Diocese of Southwark /ˈsʌðɪk/[4] is one of the 42 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905[5] from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.[6]

The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991,[7] the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries:[8]

In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

Diocese of Southwark
Diocese of Southwark arms
Location
Ecclesiastical provinceCanterbury
ArchdeaconriesCroydon, Lambeth, Lewisham & Greenwich, Reigate, Southwark, Wandsworth
Statistics
Parishes300
Churches370
Information
CathedralSouthwark Cathedral
Current leadership
BishopChristopher Chessun, Bishop of Southwark
SuffragansRichard Cheetham, area Bishop of Kingston
Jonathan Clark, area Bishop of Croydon
Karowei Dorgu, area Bishop of Woolwich
ArchdeaconsChris Skilton, Archdeacon of Croydon[1][2]
Alastair Cutting, Archdeacon of Lewisham & Greenwich[2]
Jane Steen, Archdeacon of Southwark[2]
Simon Gates, Archdeacon of Lambeth[3]
John Kiddle, Archdeacon of Wandsworth
Moira Astin, Archdeacon of Reigate
David Stephenson, Acting Archdeacon of Lambeth
Website
southwark.anglican.org
Southwark Cathedral, 24th floor
Southwark Cathedral

Bishops

Alongside the diocesan Bishop of Southwark (Christopher Chessun), the Diocese has three area (suffragan) bishops: Richard Cheetham, area Bishop of Kingston; Jonathan Clark, area Bishop of Croydon; and Karowei Dorgu, area Bishop of Woolwich. Since 1994 the Bishop of Fulham (currently Jonathan Baker, since 2013) has provided 'alternative episcopal oversight' in the diocese (along with those of London and Rochester) to those parishes which reject the ministry of priests who are women. Baker is licensed as an honorary assistant bishop in Southwark diocese in order to facilitate his work there.

Several other bishops are licensed as honorary assistant bishops in the diocese:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Archdeacon of Croydon announced". 31 October 2012. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2013.
  2. ^ a b c "New Archdeacons for Southwark Diocese". 16 December 2013. Archived from the original on 12 January 2013. Retrieved 5 April 2013.
  3. ^ Diocese of Southwark – New Archdeacon of Lambeth Archived 20 July 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "Southwark", in The Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World (1952), New York: Columbia University Press.
  5. ^ "No. 27777". The London Gazette. 21 March 1905. p. 2169.
  6. ^ "No. 27777". The London Gazette. 21 March 1905. p. 2169.
  7. ^ "4: The Dioceses Commission, 1978–2002" (PDF). Church of England. Retrieved 23 April 2013.
  8. ^ Diocese of Southwark: Bishops and Officers Archived 7 May 2012 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved on 29 June 2012.
  9. ^ Doe, Michael David. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 21 August 2014. closed access
  10. ^ Harries, Richard Douglas. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 21 August 2014. closed access
  11. ^ Atksinson, David John. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 21 August 2014. closed access
  12. ^ "Alan David Chesters". Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing. Retrieved 18 June 2016.
  13. ^ Selby, Peter Stephen Maurice. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 21 August 2014. closed access
  14. ^ Stock, (William) Nigel. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 21 August 2014. closed access
  15. ^ "Appointments". Church Times (#7920). 2 January 2014. p. 31. ISSN 0009-658X. Retrieved 2 January 2015. (Subscription required (help)). Cite uses deprecated parameter |subscription= (help)

External links

Coordinates: 51°30′22″N 0°5′23″W / 51.50611°N 0.08972°W

All Saints Church, Peckham

All Saints Church is an Evangelical Anglican church in Blenheim Grove, Peckham, London. It is part of Camberwell Deanery within the Anglican Diocese of Southwark in the Church of England. On the verge of closing down in 1996 due to a dwindling congregation, the church has grown rapidly over the last decade and now has a membership of over 400 adults.

All Saints Church, West Dulwich

All Saints Church is a Church of England parish church in West Dulwich, South London. It is a red brick building designed in a Gothic Revival style by George Fellowes Prynne and built 1888–91. It is Grade I listed.

Church of St John the Baptist, Outwood

The Church of St John the Baptist, Outwood is the parish church of Outwood, Surrey, England.

Church of St Nicholas, Charlwood

The Church of St Nicholas, Charlwood is the parish church of Charlwood, Surrey, England. With a 12th-century tower and nave section and examples of 13th to 15th century art, fixtures and architecture, it is a Grade I listed building.

Holy Trinity Church, Rotherhithe

Holy Trinity Church, Rotherhithe, is a Church of England parish church in Rotherhithe, south east London, within the diocese of Southwark.

Holy Trinity Church, Tulse Hill

Holy Trinity Church, Trinity Rise, in the Tulse Hill area of the London Borough of Lambeth is a Grade II Listed Building

St Alban's, Cheam

St Alban's, Cheam, also known as the Church of St Alban the Martyr, is one of three Church of England churches in the parish of Cheam in the London Borough of Sutton.It was founded in 1930 and, inspired by the building of a barn church in North Sheen (now incorporated into Kew), was constructed using materials from the farmhouse, barns and other outbuildings at Cheam Court Farm, which may have been connected with Henry VIII's Nonsuch Palace. Edward Swan, the Barn Church's architect, was also commissioned as one of the architects for the new church at Cheam.

St Andrew's, Earlsfield

St Andrew's, Earlsfield is an Anglican church at 571 Garratt Lane, Earlsfield, London.It was built in 1889–90, and the architect was Edward William Mountford. It is a Grade II listed building since 2000.

St Andrew's Church, Ham

St Andrew's Church, Ham, is a Grade II listed Church of England church on Church Road, Ham Common in Ham, London.

St Andrew's Church, Surbiton

St Andrew's Church, Surbiton is one of two Church of England parish churches in Surbiton, London - the other is St Mark's. It is dedicated to Saint Andrew, and is situated at the junction of St Andrew's Road and Maple Road.

St Anne's Church, Wandsworth

St Anne's Church, Wandsworth is a Grade II* listed church on St Ann's Hill, Wandsworth, London.

St James's Church, Bermondsey

St James's Church, Bermondsey is a Church of England parish church in Bermondsey, south London. It was completed and consecrated in 1829 and given a separate parish (split off from the ancient parish of St Mary Magdalene's, Bermondsey) in 1840. In 1949 it was designated a Grade II* listed building.

St John the Divine, Kennington

St John the Divine, Kennington, is an Anglican church in London. The parish of Kennington is within the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. The church was designed by the architect George Edmund Street (who also built the Royal Courts of Justice on Strand, London) in the Decorated Gothic style, and was built between 1871 and 1874. Today it is a grade I listed building.

The church stands on Vassall Road, Kennington, in Vassall Ward in the London Borough of Lambeth. It is near Oval tube station and the Oval Cricket Ground. The spire can be seen clearly for miles around.

St John the Divine, Richmond

St John the Divine, Richmond, in the Anglican Diocese of Southwark, is a Grade II listed church on Kew Road, in Richmond, London, near Richmond railway station. Built in 1836, and a parish in its own right since 1838, it was designed by Lewis Vulliamy in the Early Gothic Revival architectural style.Since 1996 St John the Divine has been part of the Richmond Team Ministry, which also includes the churches of St Mary Magdalene and St Matthias.

St Mark's Church, Surbiton

St Mark's Church, Surbiton is one of two Church of England parish churches in Surbiton, London - the other is St Andrew's. It is dedicated to Saint Mark, and is situated near the top of St Mark's Hill, near the junction with Church Hill Road.

St Mary's Church, Battersea

St Mary's Church, Battersea, is the oldest of the churches in Battersea in the London Borough of Wandsworth, in the inner south-west of the UK's capital city. Its parish shared by three Anglican churches is in the diocese of Southwark. Christians have worshipped at the site continusously since around 800 AD. It is a Grade I listed building for its combined heritage and architectural merit.

St Nicholas, Tooting Graveney

St Nicholas, Tooting Graveney, is a Church of England parish church in central Tooting, London.

St Nicholas Church, Sutton, London

St Nicholas Church, Sutton is a Grade II* listed parish church in the centre of Sutton, London. It was built between 1862 and 1864 in the Gothic style with dressed flint and stone dressings. It was designed by the architect, Edwin Nash.

St Peter's Church, Walworth

St Peter's Church is an Anglican parish church in Walworth, London, in the Woolwich Episcopal Area of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It was built between 1823–25 and was the first church designed by Sir John Soane, in the wave of the church-building following the Napoleonic wars. It is the best preserved of Soane's churches.

It is a Commissioners' church, receiving a grant under the Church Building Act 1818 towards the cost of its construction. The church cost £18,592 (equivalent to £1,610,000 in 2018), and the grant from the Church Building Commission amounted to £9,354. The church is a Grade I listed building.It resembles two other churches by the same architect — in particular Holy Trinity Church Marylebone — in its use of London stock brickwork with stone dressings, and carries the Soane hallmark of tall arched windows set in recesses. The depressed Ionic front with cornice sand balustrade over avoids the architectural problems encountered when a pediment is used.

The east end was altered in 1888, and following wartime bomb damage, major reconstruction was carried out in 1953. The interior was re-ordered in 1982. St Peter's has always maintained a catholic tradition of worship, pastoral care and mission within the parish of Walworth, St Peter.

The building was badly damaged by German bombing on 29 October 1940, when more than 30 of those sheltering in the crypt were killed outright and 100 more were injured. The church was restored under the direction of Thomas F. Ford and was re-dedicated by the Bishop of Southwark on 11 July 1953.Today, St Peter's thrives as an Anglican parish church serving the community of East Walworth. St Peter's also enjoys close links with St Peter's CofE Primary School and nursery, where the Rector is Chair of Governors.

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