Angleball

Angleball is a registered sports fitness organization and patented equipment manufacturer for North America's oldest sport, anejodi[1]. Angleball's anejodi rules were reestablished as an American tradition during World War 2 at Brown University by collegiate Hall of Fame football and basketball coach Charles "Rip" Engle (March 26, 1906 – March 7, 1983) to keep American World War 2 servicemen fit prior to deployment[2]. Angleball equipment is currently played by 1,000,000+ people in the United States and worldwide and for conditioning in the NFL and by Team USA Olympic athletes. Since 2014, Angleball has inspired a recurring game-type in the world's best selling video game series, Call of Duty, called Uplink[3]. International Angleball has 13 current member countries.[4]. The Angleball organization honors its ancient heritage by encouraging groups to produce their own anejodi equipment to Angleball's patented measurements, using available or natural materials, as long as the equipment is not sold. Angleball is a registered trademark and is sold exclusively by the Angleball company[5].

Angleball17
American Angleball Championship 2015

Gameplay

Two large target-balls are placed on standards at opposite sides of a field, however half-field can also be played[6][7] The Angleball can be run or passed. A goal is worth one point. Angleball can be played with varying levels of contact: non-contact, touch-contact, and full-contact; this is similar to flag, touch and tackle football.[8] The means of stopping the offense depends on the level of contact that the group has decided on: in non-contact Angleball, the ball-carrier may not take a step with the angleball; in touch Angleball the ball-carrier must pass within 3 seconds after being tagged; in full-contact Angleball the ball must be passed or shot within 3 seconds of a tag and contact is allowed. It is also often played that a pass cannot touch the ground, and that a circle key surrounds each standard that the offense cannot step inside; club variations are welcome within the Angleball community. Complete competition rules can be found on the Angleball company website [2]. Angleball can be played with as few as 1 v 1 with a single standard placed against a rebound wall, all the way up to 100 v 100 with a standard at both ends of a park or camp[9].

The Angleball Championship has been held annually since 2014. [10]

History Notes

The first high school game played was in the late 1960s at Pioneer Ranch in Tidioute, Pennsylvania, when the Corry High School Beavers football team hosted the Titusville Rockets team. Corry's athletic director and head football coach, Lou Hanna, and Titusville's athletic director, Roy Van Horn, had been teammates on the 1939 Slippery Rock State Teachers College undefeated championship football team.[11] The game was won by Corry.

Van Horn was the owner of Pioneer Ranch, a boys camp on the Allegheny River near Tidioute, Pennsylvania. With Hanna, he founded the Northwestern Pennsylvania Football Camp at Pioneer Ranch in 1961, the nation's first summertime football camp for high school gridders, and hired Penn State's coaches to staff it.[12] It was here a relationship with Rip Engle was formed, and they were first introduced to anejodi.

In the mid-1990s the game was also introduced to students at Taylor University in Upland, Indiana by Philosophy Professor, Dr. James Spiegel. On October 4, 2009 Angleball was introduced to a group of about 20 people in Tucson, Arizona. It remains a favorite in Gym classes at Bellefonte Area High School in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, Penns Valley Area High School in Spring Mills, Pennsylvania, Philipsburg-Osceola Area School District in Philipsburg, Pennsylvania, as well as Park Forest and Mount Nittany Middle Schools in State College, Pennsylvania. Angleball sets are manufactured by the American association and are being used in the NFL and by Colleges, camps, schools, and all age groups throughout the United States and Canada. In 2011 at the 100th year celebration of the Dept. of Kinesiology at Penn State, an Angleball association set was featured in "The Ball Games of the World Exhibit" presented by Dr. Ken Swalgin, Associate Professor of Kinesiology. The exhibit includes over 80 balls, equipment, and posters depicting ball sports from around the world. Ball sports are categorized as follows: handball games, bowls and bowling, ball and bat games, racket and paddle games, football games, ball and raised goal games, invasion goal games, and other ball games.(Swalgin, K.L. 2011).

In 2012, an Angleball set was adopted by the NFL's Philadelphia Eagles for preseason conditioning.

In September 2013, American Angleball sponsored the first angleball match in Africa (Masaka, Uganda) with the help of Sporting Is The Answer.

References

  1. ^ http://www.cherokee.org/AboutTheNation/Culture/General/Stickball%28anejodi%29.aspx
  2. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1955&dat=19660525&id=8wYrAAAAIBAJ&sjid=SZgFAAAAIBAJ&pg=6627,5645232
  3. ^ http://www.angleball.net
  4. ^ "American Angleball". American Angleball. Retrieved 2016-12-04.
  5. ^ "Justia Trademarks".
  6. ^ "Lebanon Daily News from Lebanon, Pennsylvania on August 9, 1966 · Page 12". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2016-12-04.
  7. ^ "The Pocono Record from Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania on May 25, 1966 · Page 15". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2016-12-04.
  8. ^ Vickey, Ted (2008). 101 Fitness Games for Kids at Camp. Coaches Choice Books. p. 73. ISBN 978-1-58518-070-7.
  9. ^ "Lake Ann Camp on Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved 2016-12-04.
  10. ^ "American Angleball". American Angleball. Retrieved 2016-12-04.
  11. ^ [1], Roy Van Horn, Slippery Rock Hall of Fame.
  12. ^ Dohrmann, George (2001-06-25). "Sweat Shopping: Though rife with NCAA violations, college-run football camps have become bull markets for recruiters". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on 2013-01-02. Retrieved 2008-03-20.

External links

Anejodi

According to the Cherokee Nation, Anejodi is a sport played between two even teams who compete over control of a ball which is used to strike a target on top of a pole. [1] Anejodi is the oldest known team sport in North America, having been first documented by French artist and explorer, Jacques LeMoyne in 1591, after he observed the sport being played by the Timucua People of present day Florida in the United States. LeMoyne illustrated the sport being played with a description that reads as follows, "The young men, they played a certain ball game in the following manner. A post was erected in the middle of an area, and the one who managed to hit the target on top with a ball was awarded a prize" (Library of Congress). Anejodi was also memorialized in a 20-foot-tall bronze statue in Oklahoma in the United States.Anejodi was reestablished as an American tradition in 1942 by Charles "Rip" Engle, a D1 Hall of Fame football and basketball coach, based on historical art and descriptions of the sport. Engle used the sport to condition American World War 2 service men and women at Brown University. Engle's legacy is carried on by ANGLEBALL USA & Worldwide which manufactures Anejodi equipment to Engle's specifications, in the United States.

Kī-o-rahi

Kī-o-rahi is a ball sport played in New Zealand with a small round ball called a 'kī'. It is a fast-paced game incorporating skills similar to rugby union, netball and touch. Two teams of seven players play on a circular field divided into zones, and score points by touching the 'pou' (boundary markers) and hitting a central 'tupu' or target. The game is played with varying rules (e.g. number of people, size of field, tag ripping rules etc.) depending on the geographic area it is played in. A process called Tatu, before the game, determines which rules the two teams will use.

In 2005 kī-o-rahi was chosen to represent New Zealand by global fast-food chain McDonald's as part of its 'Passport to Play' programme to teach physical play activities in 31,000 American schools.

The programme will give instruction in 15 ethnic games to seven million primary school children.The New Zealand kī-o-rahi representative organisation, Kī-o-Rahi Akotanga Iho, formed with men's and women's national teams, completed a 14 match tour of Europe in September and October 2010. The men's team included 22-test All Black veteran Wayne Shelford who led the team to a 57–10 test win against Kī-o-Rahi Dieppe Organisation, the French Kī-o-Rahi federation.

Shelford's kī-o-rahi test jersey made him the first kī-o-rahi/rugby double international for NZ. The women's team coached by Andrea Cameron (Head of PE at Tikipunga High School) also won by 33–0. These were the first historic test matches between NZ and France.

List of Amstrad CPC games

This list contains 1694 game titles released for the Amstrad CPC home computer series.

List of ball games

This is a list of ball games which are popular games or sports involving some type of ball or similar object. Ball sports are not sports in the true sense, but are instead considered to be games. These ball games can be grouped by the general objective of the game, sometimes indicating a common origin either of a game itself or of its basic idea:

Bat-and-ball games, such as cricket and baseball.

Racquet and ball games, such as tennis, squash, racquetball and ball badminton.

Hand and ball-striking games, such as various handball codes, rebound handball and 4 square.

Goal games, such as forms of hockey (except ice hockey which uses a hockey puck), basketball and all forms of football or lacrosse.

Net games, such as volleyball and sepak.

Penn State Nittany Lions football

The Penn State Nittany Lions team represents the Pennsylvania State University in college football. The Nittany Lions compete in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision as a member of the Big Ten Conference, which they joined in 1993 after playing as an Independent from their founding through 1992.Established in 1887, the Nittany Lions have achieved numerous on-field successes, the most notable of which include two consensus national championships (1982 and 1986), four Big Ten Conference Championships (in 1994, 2005, 2008, and 2016), and 48 appearances in college bowl games, with a postseason bowl record of 29–17–2. The team is also #8 in all-time total wins, one game behind Oklahoma and Alabama. The Nittany Lions play their home games at Beaver Stadium, located on-campus in University Park, Pennsylvania. With an official seating capacity of 106,572, Beaver Stadium is the second-largest stadium in the western hemisphere, behind only Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The team is currently coached by James Franklin.

Quidditch (sport)

Quidditch is a sport of two teams of seven players each mounted on broomsticks played on a hockey rink-sized pitch. It is based on a fictional game of the same name invented by author J. K. Rowling, which is featured in the Harry Potter series of novels and related media.[3] The game is also sometimes referred to as muggle quidditch to distinguish it from the fictional game, which involves magical elements such as flying broomsticks and enchanted balls. In the Harry Potter universe, a "muggle" is a person without the power to use magic.

The pitch is rectangular with rounded corners 55 meters (60 yards) by 33 meters (36 yards) with three hoops of varying heights at either end.[4] The sport was created in 2005 and is therefore still quite young. However, quidditch is played around the world and actively growing.[5] The ultimate goal is to have more points than the other team by the time the snitch, a tennis ball inside a long sock hanging from the shorts of an impartial official dressed in yellow, is caught. Rules of the sport are governed by the International Quidditch Association, or the IQA, and events are sanctioned by either the IQA or that nation's governing body.

To score points, chasers or keepers must get the quaffle, a slightly deflated volleyball, into one of three of the opposing hoops which scores the team 10 points.[6] To impede the quaffle from advancing down the pitch, chasers and keepers are able to tackle opposing chasers and keepers at the same time as beaters using their bludgers—dodgeballs—to take out opposing players. Once a player is hit by an opposing bludger, that player must dismount their broom, drop any ball being held, and return to and touch their hoops before being allowed back into play.[7] The game is ended once the snitch is caught by one of the seekers, awarding that team 30 points.[8]A team consists of minimum seven (maximum 21) players, of which six are always on the pitch, those being the three chasers, one keeper, and two beaters. Besides the seeker who is off-pitch, the six players are required to abide by the gender rule, which states that a team may have a maximum of four players who identify as the same gender, making quidditch one of the few sports that not only offers a co-ed environment but an open community to those who do not identify with the gender binary.[10] Matches or games often run about 30 to 40 minutes but tend to be subject to varying lengths of time due to the unpredictable nature of the snitch catch. If the score at the end of the match including the 30 point snitch catch is tied (such that the team that caught the snitch was 30 points behind the other), the game moves to overtime where the snitch is constrained to the pitch's dimensions and the game ends after five minutes or when the snitch is legally caught.

Rip Engle

Charles A. "Rip" Engle (March 26, 1906 – March 7, 1983) was an American football player and coach of football and basketball. He served as the head football coach at Brown University from 1944 to 1949 and at Pennsylvania State University from 1950 to 1966, compiling a career college football record of 132–68–8. Engle was also the head basketball coach Western Maryland College–now known as McDaniel College–during the 1941–42 season at Brown from 1942 to 1946, tallying a career college basketball mark of 53–55. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1973.

Sports in the United States

Sports in the United States are an important part of American culture. American football is the most popular sport to watch in the United States, followed by baseball, basketball, and soccer. Hockey, tennis, golf, wrestling, auto racing, arena football, field lacrosse, box lacrosse and volleyball are also popular sports in the country.

Based on revenue, the four major professional sports leagues in the United States are Major League Baseball (MLB), the National Basketball Association (NBA), the National Football League (NFL), and the National Hockey League (NHL). The market for professional sports in the United States is roughly $69 billion, roughly 50% larger than that of all of Europe, the Middle East, and Africa combined. All four enjoy wide-ranging domestic media coverage and are considered the preeminent leagues in their respective sports in the world, although American football does not have a substantial following in other nations. Three of those leagues have teams that represent Canadian cities, and all four are the most financially lucrative sports leagues of their sport. Major League Soccer (MLS), which also includes teams based in Canada, is sometimes included in a "top five" of leagues. With an average attendance of over 20,000 per game, MLS has the third highest average attendance of any sports league in the U.S. after the National Football League (NFL) and Major League Baseball (MLB), and is the seventh highest attended professional soccer league worldwide.Professional teams in all major sports in the United States operate as franchises within a league, meaning that a team may move to a different city if the team's owners believe there would be a financial benefit, but franchise moves are usually subject to some form of league-level approval. All major sports leagues use a similar type of regular-season schedule with a post-season playoff tournament. In addition to the major league–level organizations, several sports also have professional minor leagues, active in smaller cities across the country. As in Canada and Australia, sports leagues in the United States do not practice promotion and relegation, unlike many sports leagues in Europe.

Sports are particularly associated with education in the United States, with most high schools and universities having organized sports, and this is a unique sporting footprint for the U.S. College sports competitions play an important role in the American sporting culture, and college basketball and college football are as popular as professional sports in some parts of the country. The major sanctioning body for college sports is the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Unlike most other nations, the United States government does not provide funding for sports nor for the United States Olympic Committee.

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