Angelo Coia

Angelo Anthony Coia (April 21, 1938 – January 2, 2013)[1] was an American football end in the National Football League (NFL) for the Chicago Bears, the Washington Redskins, and the Atlanta Falcons. He played college football at the University of Southern California (USC) and The Citadel and was selected in the 20th round of the 1960 NFL Draft. He attended Northeast Public High School in Philadelphia and was a teammate of future Green Bay Packer Herb Adderley there. At Northeast, Coia starred as a football player at halfback and with Adderley helped lead the team to the 1955 Public League Championship. He also was the city sprint champion at 220 yards in track.

After his NFL career, Coia was a racehorse owner and worked as a scout for the Raiders. Before his death, Coia was a resident of Brigantine, New Jersey.[2]

Angelo Coia
No. 46, 48
Born:April 21, 1938
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Died:January 2, 2013 (aged 74)
Brigantine, New Jersey
Career information
Position(s)End
CollegeCitadel
Southern California
AFL draft1960 / Round: 2 / Pick: First Selections
Drafted byNew York Titans
NFL draft1960 / Round: 20 / Pick: 237
Career history
As player
1960–1963Chicago Bears
1964–1965Washington Redskins
1966Atlanta Falcons
Career stats

References

  1. ^ Frank Fitzpatrick. "Angelo Coia dies; ex-NFL player and Philadelphia high school star". Philly.com. Retrieved 2013-01-04.
  2. ^ Fitzpatrick, Frank. "Angelo Coia dies; ex-NFL player and Philadelphia high school star", The Philadelphia Inquirer, January 4, 2013, backed up by the Internet Archive as of December 5, 2013. Accessed May 23, 2018. "After Mr. Coia retired as a player, he trained and owned racehorses and also coached youth football in the Northeast. Later, he reunited with Davis and worked several years as a Raiders scout. He spent his final years in Brigantine, N.J."

External links

1959 USC Trojans football team

The 1959 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1959 college football season. In their third year under head coach Don Clark, the Trojans compiled an 8–2 record (3–1 against conference opponents), finished in a tie for the Athletic Association of Western Universities championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 195 to 90. Total attendance for all 10 games was 453,865.Ben Charles led the team in passing with 20 of 46 passes completed for 843 yards, four touchdowns and three interceptions. Jerry Traynham led the team in rushing with 123 carries for 583 yards and two touchdowns. Luther Hayes was the leading receiver with nine catches for 179 yards and two touchdowns.This was the first season for the five-team AAWU, following the dissolution of the Pacific Coast Conference in the spring. It comprised the four teams from state of California and Washington in Seattle. The other four teams from the north (Oregon, Oregon State, Washington State, and Idaho) were independent for several seasons.

1960 American Football League draft

The 1960 American Football League draft was held on November 22–23, 1959, in Minneapolis, shortly after the organization of the league, and lasted 33 rounds. An additional draft of 20 rounds was held by the AFL on December 2.

1960 NFL Draft

The 1960 National Football League Draft in which NFL teams take turns selecting amateur college American football players and other first-time eligible players, was held at the Warwick Hotel in Philadelphia on November 30, 1959. Many players, including half of those drafted in the first round, signed with teams in the newly created American Football League, including the first overall pick and Heisman Trophy winner Billy Cannon. At the time of the draft, the Cardinals were still the Chicago Cardinals; they moved to St. Louis in March 1960. The Dallas Cowboys were enfranchised in January 1960 after the draft.

1961 Chicago Bears season

The 1961 Chicago Bears season was their 42nd regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–6 record under George Halas, which was an improvement over the 5–6–1 record of the previous season.

2013 NFL season

The 2013 NFL season was the 94th season in the history of the National Football League (NFL). The season saw the Seattle Seahawks capture the first championship in the franchise's 38 years in the league with a lopsided 43-8 victory over the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XLVIII, the league's championship game. The Super Bowl was played at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey on Sunday, February 2, 2014. It was the first Super Bowl hosted by New Jersey and the first to be held outdoors in a cold weather environment. The Seahawks scored 12 seconds into the game and held the lead the rest of the way.

Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning was named the regular season's Most Valuable Player (MVP) by the voters of the Associated Press (AP) for a record fifth time after compiling passing stats which included regular season records for passing yards and passing touchdowns. Manning also was named the Offensive Player of the Year for the second time in his career. Carolina Panthers linebacker Luke Kuechly earned Defensive Player of the Year honors.

Scoring reached historic levels throughout the league in 2013. As a whole the league set records for total points scored, points scored per game and the number of both touchdowns and field goals scored. The Broncos set a new standard for team scoring in the regular season with 606 points. In addition to the Broncos, ten other teams each scored over 400 points, the greatest number of teams to surpass that benchmark in a single year.

The regular season got underway on Thursday, September 5, 2013, with the Broncos hosting the defending Super Bowl XLVII champion Baltimore Ravens in the annual kickoff game. The game presaged the Broncos' historic offensive production with a strong performance by Peyton Manning in which he tied a league record in throwing seven touchdown passes and led the Broncos to a 49–27 win. The game was the start of a disappointing season for the Ravens in which they would finish out of the playoffs with an 8–8 record, thus ensuring that there would be no repeat Super Bowl winner for a tied record ninth straight season. The regular season wrapped up on Sunday night, December 29.

The playoffs began with the wild card round which took place the first weekend of January 2014. The league's propensity for scoring did not abate in the post-season, as exemplified by the Indianapolis Colts' wild come-from-behind 45–44 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in the playoffs' opening game. The Conference Championship games featured the top seeded teams in each conference, the Seahawks in the NFC and the Broncos in the American Football Conference (AFC), hosting the San Francisco 49ers and New England Patriots respectively. Both home teams prevailed to set up just the second Super Bowl matchup of #1 seeds in the past 20 seasons.

2013 in the United States

Events in the year 2013 in the United States.

Al Davis

Allen Davis (July 4, 1929 – October 8, 2011) was an American football coach and executive. He was the principal owner and general manager of the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League (NFL) for 39 years, from 1972 until his death in 2011. Prior to becoming the principal owner of the Raiders, he served as the team's head coach from 1963 to 1965 and part owner from 1966 to 1971, assuming both positions while the Raiders were part of the American Football League (AFL). He also served as the commissioner of the AFL in 1966.

Known for his motto "Just win, baby", the Raiders became one of the NFL's most successful and popular teams under Davis' management. Although the franchise would enter a period of decline in his final years, the Raiders would enjoy many successes during the 1970s and 1980s, and won three Super Bowl titles. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1992.

Davis was active in civil rights, refusing to allow the Raiders to play in any city where black and white players had to stay in separate hotels. He was the first NFL owner to hire an African American head coach and a female chief executive. He was also the second NFL owner to hire a Latino head coach (Tom Flores). He remains the only executive in NFL history to be an assistant coach, head coach, general manager, commissioner, and owner.

Brigantine, New Jersey

Brigantine is an island city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 9,450, reflecting a decline of 3,144 (-25.0%) from the 12,594 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,240 (+10.9%) from the 11,354 counted in the 1990 Census.What is now the City of Brigantine has passed through a series of names and re-incorporations since it was first created. The area was originally incorporated as Brigantine Beach Borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on June 14, 1890, from portions of Galloway Township, based on the results of a referendum held on June 3, 1890. On April 23, 1897, the area was reincorporated as the City of Brigantine City. This name lasted until April 9, 1914, when it was renamed the City of East Atlantic City. On March 16, 1924, Brigantine was incorporated as a city, replacing East Atlantic City and incorporating further portions of Galloway Township. The borough was named for the many shipwrecks in the area, including those of brigantines.New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Brigantine as its 36th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.

Coia

Coia is an Italian, English & Scottish surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Angelo Coia (1938–2013), American football player

Emilio Coia (born 1911), artist and widely published caricaturist from Glasgow

Maximin Coia (born 1983), French pair skater

Paul Coia (born 1955), Scottish television presenter and continuity announcer

Charles Coia (born 1986), Rugby player

Cowboys–Redskins rivalry

The Cowboys–Redskins rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Dallas Cowboys and Washington Redskins. In 2005, Sports Illustrated called it the top NFL rivalry of all time and "one of the greatest in sports." ESPN ranked it the best rivalry in the NFL. The Sportster has ranked it the 17th biggest rivalry in the world. During the tenure of this rivalry, the two franchises have won 32 combined division titles and eight combined Super Bowls.

They are two of the wealthiest franchises in the NFL.

The rivalry started in 1960 when the Cowboys joined the league as an expansion team. During that year they were in separate conferences, but played once during the season. In 1961, Dallas was placed in the same division as the Redskins, and from that point on, they have played each other twice in every regular season.

Deaths in January 2013

The following is a list of notable deaths in January 2013.

Entries for each day are listed alphabetically by surname. A typical entry lists information in the following sequence:

Name, age, country of citizenship and reason for notability, established cause of death, reference.

Fred Williams (defensive lineman)

Fred Williams (February 8, 1929 – October 9, 2000) was an American football defensive lineman in the National Football League (NFL) for the Chicago Bears and Washington Redskins. He went to four Pro Bowls during his 14-year career. Williams played college football at the University of Arkansas and was drafted in the fifth round of the 1952 NFL Draft.

List of Atlanta Falcons players

This is a list of American football players who have played for the Atlanta Falcons in the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least one game in the NFL regular season. The Atlanta Falcons franchise was founded in 1966. The Falcons have appeared in Super Bowl XXXIII and Super Bowl LI, losing both games.

List of USC Trojans in the NFL Draft

This is a list of USC Trojans football players in the NFL Draft.

List of University of Southern California people

This is a list of notable alumni, faculty, and students, from the University of Southern California. Those individuals who qualify for multiple categories have been placed under the section for which they are best known.

List of Washington Redskins first-round draft picks

In American football, the Washington Redskins joined the National Football League in 1932 as the Boston Braves. In 1933, the name was changed to the Boston Redskins, and finally, in 1937 the Redskins moved to Washington, D.C. The Redskins' first selection as an NFL team was Riley Smith, a blocking back from Alabama. The team's most-recent first-round selection was Jonathan Allen, a defensive lineman from Alabama.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as the "NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.The Redskins have selected number one overall twice: Harry Gilmer and Ernie Davis. The team has also selected number two overall three times and number three overall five times. The Redskins have selected players from the University of Alabama four times, the University of Miami three times, and Penn State University three times. Four eventual Hall of Famers were selected by the Redskins in the first round: Sammy Baugh, Darrell Green, Art Monk, and Charley Taylor.Two Washington Redskins first-round draft picks have died during their football careers. The first was Ernie Davis, who was chosen as the first overall pick in 1962. After being traded to the Cleveland Browns for Bobby Mitchell and Leroy Jackson, Davis was diagnosed with leukemia and died before playing a game with the Browns. The other was Sean Taylor, the Redskins' first round pick in 2004, who was fatally shot in November 2007 during his fourth season with the team.

List of Washington Redskins players

This is a list of American football players who have played for the Washington Redskins, as well as its predecessors the Boston Braves (1932) and Boston Redskins (1933–1936), in the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least five games in the NFL regular season. The Washington Redskins franchise was founded in Boston, Massachusetts as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The name was changed the next year to the Redskins. In 1937, the franchise moved to Washington, D.C.The Redskins have played over 1,000 games. In those games, the club won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. The franchise captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.Overall, the Redskins have had a total of 23 players and coaches (17 primary, six minor) inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Many Redskins players have also had successful college football careers, including six who were Heisman Trophy winners: Gary Beban, Desmond Howard, Vic Janowicz, George Rogers, Danny Wuerffel, and Robert Griffin III. In addition, the Heisman Trophy sculpture was modeled after Ed Smith in 1934, who became a Redskins player in 1936.Several former players have become head coach of the Redskins, including Turk Edwards, Dick Todd, and Jack Pardee. In addition, former players have become assistant coaches, such as Earnest Byner, Russ Grimm, Greg Manusky, and Keenan McCardell. Other players have also become successful in non-sport activities, like acting (Terry Crews and Jamal Duff) and politics (Tom Osborne and Heath Shuler).Players on the Redskins have also been related from time to time. In 1957, Redskins end Joe Walton became the first son of an NFL player to play in the league. His father, Frank Walton also played on the Redskins. Joe Krakoski and his son, also named Joe Krakoski, also both played for the Redskins. In addition, four sets of brothers have played with each other while on the Redskins: Chris and Nic Clemons, Cecil and Ray Hare, Ed and Robert Khayat, and Dan and Matt Turk.

Northeast High School (Philadelphia)

Northeast High School is a high school located at 1601 Cottman Avenue (at Algon Avenue) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.

Northeast is one of the oldest high schools in Philadelphia, founded in 1890 as the Northeast Manual Training School. Before 1957, it was located at 8th Street and Lehigh Avenue in Philadelphia (later the home of Thomas Edison High School). As of June 2016 Northeast High School had 175 graduating classes. Some of the best known alumni include Herb Adderley (hall of fame football player), Eddie Stanky (major league baseball player and manager), Guy Rodgers (hall of fame basketball player), Carlos Mina from Buenos Aires, Argentina (hall of fame soccer player) and Sonny Hill (organizer of Philadelphia summer basketball leagues).

Northeast serves Rhawnhurst and other sections of Northeast Philadelphia. The high school was featured in the A&E series Teach: Tony Danza, where actor Tony Danza taught a tenth grade English class during the 2009-2010 school year. It was also the setting for Frederick Wiseman's documentary on high schools in the 1960s titled, simply, High School.

In 2015, Northeast High School was recognized by US News & World Report Best High Schools and won a bronze medal in recognition of its well rounded students, high standardized test scores, and great overall performance in Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, honors, and advanced classes.The Northeast High School website is located at http://NEHS1.com and has been developed and maintained by Northeast's web design classes.

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