Angel Stadium

Angel Stadium of Anaheim, originally known as Anaheim Stadium and later Edison International Field of Anaheim, is a modern-style ballpark located in Anaheim, California. Since its opening in 1966, it has served as the home ballpark of the Los Angeles Angels of Major League Baseball (MLB), and was also the home stadium to the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL) from 1980 to 1994. The stadium is often referred to by its unofficial nickname The Big A, coined by Herald Examiner Sports Editor, Bud Furillo. It is the fourth-oldest active Major League Baseball stadium, behind Fenway Park, Wrigley Field, and Dodger Stadium.[5] It hosted the 1967, 1989, and 2010 Major League Baseball All-Star Games.[6]

Angel Stadium and its surrounding parking lot are roughly bounded by Katella Avenue to the north, the Orange Freeway to the east, Orangewood Avenue to the south, and State College Boulevard to the west. Located near the eastern boundary of the parking lot is the landmark "Big A" sign and electronic marquee, which originally served as a scoreboard support. The halo located near the top of the 230' tall, 210-ton sign is illuminated following games in which the Angels win (both at home and on the road), which gives rise to the fan expression, "Light that baby Up!"

ARTIC (Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center) servicing the Metrolink Orange County Line and Amtrak Pacific Surfliner, is located nearby on the other side of the State Route 57 and accessed through the Douglass Road gate at the northeast corner of the parking lot. The station provides convenient access to the stadium, the nearby Honda Center, and Disneyland from various communities along the route, which links San Luis Obispo, Los Angeles, and San Diego. The Anaheim Resort Transit stops at the center along with Orange County Transportation Authority buses.

Aside from professional baseball and football, Angel Stadium has hosted high school and college football games, National Football League pre-season games, the short-lived World Football League, two crusades by evangelist Billy Graham, nearly 20 consecutive annual crusades by evangelist Greg Laurie, Eid el Fitr celebrations,[7] and concerts, and 2 to 3 AMA Supercross Championship races a year.

The stadium also houses the studios and offices of the Angels' owned and operated flagship radio station, KLAA (830 AM).

Angel Stadium of Anaheim
The Big A[1]
Angel Stadium of Anaheim
Angelstadiummarch2019
Angel Stadium in 2019
Angel Stadium of Anaheim is located in the Los Angeles metropolitan area
Angel Stadium of Anaheim
Angel Stadium of Anaheim
Location in L.A. metro area
Angel Stadium of Anaheim is located in California
Angel Stadium of Anaheim
Angel Stadium of Anaheim
Location in California
Angel Stadium of Anaheim is located in the United States
Angel Stadium of Anaheim
Angel Stadium of Anaheim
Location in the United States
Former namesAnaheim Stadium (1966–1997)
Edison International Field of Anaheim (1998–2003)
Address2000 Gene Autry Way
LocationAnaheim, California
Coordinates33°48′1″N 117°52′58″W / 33.80028°N 117.88278°WCoordinates: 33°48′1″N 117°52′58″W / 33.80028°N 117.88278°W
Public transitAmtrak Metrolink (California) Anaheim
OwnerCity of Anaheim
OperatorAngels Baseball LP
Capacity43,250 (1966)
64,593 (Baseball—1980)
69,008 (Football—1980)
45,517 (2019–present)
Field size
Left Field – 347 ft (105.8 m)
Left-Center – 390 ft (118.9 m)
Center Field – 396ft (120.7 m)
Right-Center – 370 ft (112.8 m)
Right-Center (shallow) – 365 ft (111.3 m)
Right Field – 350ft (106.7 m)
Backstop – 60.5 ft (18.4 m)
AngelStadiumDimensions
SurfaceTifway 419 Bermuda Grass
Construction
Broke groundAugust 31, 1964
OpenedApril 19, 1966
April 1, 1998 (renovations)
Construction costUS$24 million
($145 million in 2018 dollars[2])

$118 million (1997–1999 renovations)
($173 million in 2018 dollars[2])
ArchitectNoble W. Herzberg and Associates (1966)[3]
HOK Sport
Robert A. M. Stern, and
Walt Disney Imagineering (Renovations)
General contractorDel E. Webb Company (1966)
Turner Construction Company (Renovations)[4]
Tenants
Los Angeles Angels (MLB) (1966–present)
Orange County Ramblers (CoFL) (1967–1968)
Cal State Fullerton Titans football (NCAA) (1970–1971, 1983)
Southern California Sun (WFL) (1974–1975)
Long Beach State 49ers football (NCAA) (1977–1982)
California Surf (NASL) (1978–1981)
Los Angeles Rams (NFL) (1980–1994)
Freedom Bowl (NCAA) (1984–1994)

History

Beginnings

6505-AngelStadiumUnderConstruction
Anaheim Stadium under construction, May 1965

Angel Stadium has been the home of the Angels since their move from Los Angeles. On August 31, 1964, ground was broken for Anaheim Stadium and in 1966, the then-California Angels moved into their new home after having spent four seasons renting Dodger Stadium (referred to in Angels games as Chávez Ravine Stadium) from the Dodgers.

The stadium was built on a parcel of about 160 acres (0.65 km2) of flat land originally used for agricultural purposes by the Allec, Russell, and Knutzen families[1] in the southeast portion of Anaheim. Consistent with many major-league sports stadiums built in the 1960s, it is located in a suburban area, though one that is host to major tourist attractions.

The field dimensions (333 feet instead of 347 or 350, for example) were derived from a scientific study conducted by the Angels. Based on the air density at normal game times (1:30 pm and 8 pm), the Angels tried to formulate dimensions that were fairly balanced between pitcher, hitter and average weather conditions. The Angels tinkered with those dimensions several times, expanding or contracting parts of the outfield by a few feet here and there, to try to refine that balance. 396 feet (120.701 m) is the shortest center-field in the American League, and tied for 2nd-shortest in the major leagues with Petco Park behind only Dodger Stadium's 395 feet (120.396 m).

None of this seemed to matter to their Hall of Fame pitcher Nolan Ryan, who threw two of his record seven no-hitters in this ballpark, and racked up 2,416 of his 5,714 career strikeouts in eight seasons with the Angels (Ryan stats from The Sporting News Baseball Record Book). One of the no-hitters, on June 1, 1975, was his fourth, which tied Sandy Koufax's career record, one Ryan would eventually supplant.

The Rams move in

Anaheim Stadium 1991
The Angels play at an enclosed Anaheim Stadium, 1991

In the late 1970s, Los Angeles Rams owner Carroll Rosenbloom was looking for a more modern venue than the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, and also wanted a stadium that would be small enough to keep Rams games from being blacked out on local television. The Coliseum seated almost 100,000 people, and the Rams had trouble filling it even in their best years. Rosenbloom brokered a deal by which the Rams would move from Los Angeles to an expanded Anaheim Stadium. To add more seats (eventually about 23,000) for football games, the mezzanine and upper decks were extended completely around the playing field, resulting in a roughly trapezoidal, completely enclosed stadium. An elevated bank of bleachers was built in right field, and temporary seats were placed underneath, to be pulled out for football games. Another bank of bleachers was built in left field. As a result, the view of the local mountains and State Highway 57 was lost.

Additionally, the Big A scoreboard support that stood in left field, and was the inspiration for the stadium's nickname, was moved 1,300 feet (400 m) to its present site in the parking lot, adjoining the Orange Freeway beyond the right-field stands; its usage changed from scoreboard to electronic marquee advertising upcoming events at the stadium. A black and white scoreboard/instant replay video board was installed above the newly constructed upper deck seats in left field, but was later deemed inadequate, especially during day games (in 1988 the scoreboard was replaced by a Sony Jumbotron color video board, with black and white matrix scoreboards installed above the right field upper deck and the infield upper deck). A triangular metal spire was added to the top of the Jumbotron to evoke the original emplacement of the "Big A".

The changes did not sit well with Angels fans. As originally built, no seat was further than 109 feet from the field.[8] However, as was the case nearly everywhere else where the multipurpose stadium concept was tried, most of the new center field seats were too far from the action. Also, while the expanded capacity allowed the Angels to set attendance records that still stand today, on most occasions even crowds of 40,000 were swallowed up by the environment.

Angelstadiumrockpile
The centerfield rockpile, also known as the "California Spectacular"

The expansion was completed in time for the 1980 NFL season, and the Rams played in Anaheim Stadium from then until their move to St. Louis after the 1994 season. The Rams would return to Los Angeles in 2016, playing their games at the Memorial Coliseum again.

The January 17, 1994 Northridge earthquake caused the Sony Jumbotron to collapse onto the upper deck seats beneath it. No injuries were caused, as the stadium was unoccupied when the earthquake occurred in the predawn hours of a national holiday (Martin Luther King, Jr. Day). The damaged section was deconstructed and rebuilt with a new scoreboard structure and Jumbotron, eliminating the A-frame spire that evoked the Big A.[9]

The Disney era

Biga2018
The Big A in 2018

In 1996, The Walt Disney Company, a minority owner of the team since its inception (the stadium is located less than 3 miles (5 km) east of Disneyland and across from the Honda Center, the home venue of the then Disney-owned Mighty Ducks of Anaheim), gained enough support on the board to effectively take control of the team. Soon afterward, the Angels and the city of Anaheim agreed to a new deal that would keep the Angels in Anaheim until 2031, with an option to leave the facility after the 2016 season. As part of the deal, the stadium underwent an extensive renovation, returning the stadium to its original role as a baseball-only facility. Before the 1997 baseball season, the section behind the outfield wall was demolished. Disney briefly considered moving the Big A scoreboard to its original location, but decided against such a move, citing costs, as well as the fact that the Big A had become a Southern California landmark in its parking lot location.

Despite the fact that much of the stadium was still a hard-hat zone, the demolition and construction being only half-completed, the Angels played their 1997 season in Anaheim. Fans were greeted by a restored view of the San Gabriel and Santa Ana Mountains, the Brea Hills, and the 57 freeway beyond the outfield.

Work that didn't interfere with game play continued throughout the 1997 season, with major renovations resuming in the winter of 1997. These included the installation of outfield bleacher pavilions, a video display board and an out-of-town scoreboard below the right field seats. All of the multicolored seats were replaced by green seats. The exterior of the stadium was also renovated. The concrete structure and ramps were painted a combination of green and sandstone. Much of the facade of the stadium was torn down to create a more open feeling for visitors.

The most notable feature of the entire renovation, however, was a "California Spectacular" in which geysers erupt and a stream cascades down a mountainside (Pride Rock) covered with real trees, artificial rocks behind the left-center field fence, and new bullpens. Fireworks shoot out of the display at the start of games, after every Angel home run and after every Angel win (they had been shot off from a parking garage before then).

The field dimensions of the renovated stadium became somewhat asymmetrical, with the 8-foot (2.4 m) high fence in right center field (which earlier hid the football-only bleacher section) replaced by a 19-foot (5.8 m) high wall which contains a scoreboard displaying out-of-town scores of other games. A plaza was built around the perimeter of the stadium, and inside are statues depicting longtime Angel owner and chairman Gene Autry and Michelle Carew, daughter of former Angel Rod Carew, who died of leukemia at the age of 18.

Exterior of Angel Stadium, Anaheim, 2017
Angel Stadium of Anaheim's exterior

The main entrance includes two giant Angels hats complete with New Era tags on the sweatband (including one indicating the hats' size: 649½). The hats were originally blue and featured the Angels' "winged" logo designed by Disney for the 1997 season, and were repainted red and decorated with the present-day halo insignia for the 2002 season. Also outside home plate gate is a full-sized brick infield complete with regulation pitcher's mound and lighted bases, with bricks at each player position engraved with the names of Angels players who played at that position on Opening Day of each season since the Angels began play in 1961. For a fee, the green infield bricks can be engraved with fans' names or personalized messages. The Angels opened their "new" stadium on April 1, 1998 with a 4–1 victory over the New York Yankees.[10] The renovated stadium has 5,075 club seats and 78 luxury suites.

In 1998, the stadium was renamed Edison International Field of Anaheim after local utility Edison International reached a deal giving it naming rights over the stadium for 20 years, and during this time, the stadium was referred to as the Big Ed. However, after the 2003 season, Edison International exercised its option to exit the sponsorship deal. On December 29, 2003, the Angels announced that from then on the stadium would be known as Angel Stadium (in full, Angel Stadium of Anaheim). Some locals can still be caught calling the venue by its original name, Anaheim Stadium, as well. After the name change in 2004, its original nickname, The Big A, was restored again. Despite efforts to cover them up with the Angels' halo insignia, Edison's insignia can still be found on the ends of seating rows throughout the ballpark.

In 2009, Brookings, South Dakota-based Daktronics installed light emitting diode (LED) displays at the stadium. The largest video display measures 41 ft (12.50 m) high by 67 ft (20.42 m) wide. Two smaller displays flank the large display, and a field-level display sits in the centerfield fence.[11]

The stadium will host baseball and softball at the 2028 Summer Olympics.[12]

During the 2017-2018 offseason, the Angels upgraded the existing video boards in left and right field. The new left field video board measures 5,488 sq.ft., while the new right field board measures 9,500 sq.ft., the fourth largest scoreboard in MLB. In addition to this, the out of town scoreboard was upgraded, new video ribbons stretch from foul pole to foul pole, and a new sound system was added. Because of the new out of town scoreboard, the Angels moved the home run line in right field down from 18 feet to eight feet, though the right field wall remains the same height.[13][14]

Seating capacity

Baseball
Years Capacity
1966–1978
43,202
1979
43,250
1980–1985
65,158
1986–1987
64,573
1988–1996
64,593
1997
33,851
1998–2005
45,050
2006–2007
45,262
2008–2009
45,281
2010–2011
45,389
2012
45,957
2013–2014
45,483
2015
45,957
2016 45,493[15]
2017–2018 45,477[16]
2019–present 45,517[17]
Football
Years Capacity
1980–1994
69,008

Notable events

Baseball

Panoramic view inside Angel Stadium, Anaheim
Angel Stadium in 2017

The stadium was host to the 1967 MLB All-Star Game, the first All-Star Game to be played on prime-time television. This was the first time an All-Star Game was held at night since World War II. Angel Stadium again hosted All-Star Games in 1989 and 2010.[6]

It hosted seven American League Division Series (2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2014) and six American League Championship Series (1979, 1982, 1986, 2002, 2005, and 2009). Most notably, it hosted the 2002 World Series, which the Angels won in dramatic fashion over the San Francisco Giants, finally winning one for their late and long-time owner, "Singing Cowboy" Gene Autry (and for his widow and business partner Jackie, who is also honorary president of the American League).

Angel Stadium hosted several games during Round 2 of the 2006 World Baseball Classic.

Famous individual baseball milestones attained here include Mickey Mantle's last game-winning home run, Nolan Ryan's striking out of nine straight Boston Red Sox, Reggie Jackson's 500th career home run, Rod Carew's 3,000th career base hit, Don Sutton's 300th career win, Vladimir Guerrero's 400th career home run, George Brett's 3,000th career base hit, and Albert Pujols' 600th career home run.

On Saturday, August 9, 2014, the stadium hosted its longest game ever: a 6-hour, 31-minute contest between the Angels and the Boston Red Sox. Albert Pujols led off the batting in the bottom of the 19th inning with a walk-off homer, giving the Angels the win, 5–4.[18]

The stadium is currently designated to host softball and baseball events for the 2028 Summer Olympics along with Dodger Stadium.

Football

In 2016, the St. John Bosco Braves football team beat the Mater Dei Monarchs by a score of 42-28 in the CIFSS Division 1 playoffs.

Soccer

Anaheim Stadium hosted five group stage matches of the 1996 CONCACAF Gold Cup, including two involving the United States national team.[19]

Date Winning Team Result Losing Team Tournament Spectators
January 10, 1996  Canada 3–1  Honduras 1996 CONCACAF Gold Cup First Round 27,125
 El Salvador 3–2  Trinidad and Tobago
January 13, 1996  United States 3–2  Trinidad and Tobago 12,425
January 16, 1996  Guatemala 3–0  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 52,345
 United States 2–0  El Salvador

Concerts

Angel Stadium has played host to major recording acts in concert such as The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Osmonds, Pink Floyd, The Grateful Dead, Madonna, Eagles,[20] Jackson Browne,[20] Linda Ronstadt,[20] and Toots and the Maytals.[20]

Date Artist Opening act(s) Tour / Concert name Attendance / Capacity Revenue Notes
June 14, 1970 The Who The Who Tour 1970 [21]
March 21, 1976 The Who Tour 1976
July 17, 1976 Yes 1976 Solo Albums Tour
August 7, 1976 ZZ Top Blue Öyster Cult
Johnny & Edgar Winter
Worldwide Texas Tour 49,169 / 60,000 $498,040
August 20, 1976 Kiss Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band
Ted Nugent
Montrose
Destroyer Tour 42,000+
September 10, 1976 Aerosmith Jeff Beck Rocks Tour
September 12, 1976
May 6, 1977 Pink Floyd In the Flesh Tour
May 7, 1977
August 27, 1977 Lynyrd Skynyrd Street Survivors Tour
July 23, 1978 The Rolling Stones The Rolling Stones US Tour 1978
July 24, 1978 The Outlaws
September 23, 1978 Boston Black Sabbath

Van Halen

Sammy Hagar

Never Say Die! Tour This concert was part of Summerfest.
September 24, 1978
July 17, 1982 Scorpions
Loverboy
Foriegner- headline band
Iron Maiden Summer Strut featuring Blackout Tour
The Beast on the Road
September 9, 1983 David Bowie The Go-Go's
Madness
Serious Moonlight Tour
July 18, 1987 Madonna Level 42
Bhundu Boys
Hue and Cry
Who's That Girl World Tour 62,986 / 62,986 $1,417,185
July 26, 1987 The Grateful Dead
Bob Dylan
Alone and Together Tour A portion of this show has been recorded for the album, View from the Vault, Volume Four[22]
August 8, 1987 David Bowie Siouxsie and the Banshees Glass Spider Tour 50,000 [23][24]
August 9, 1987
November 14, 1992 U2 The Sugarcubes
Public Enemy
Zoo TV Tour 48,640 / 48,640 $1,462,800
April 17, 1993 Paul McCartney The New World Tour 48,560 / 48,560 $1,698,410
June 13, 1998 NSYNC NSYNC in Concert This concert was a part of Wango Tango
November 2, 2002 The Rolling Stones Sheryl Crow Licks Tour
May 14, 2005 Kelly Clarkson Graham Colton Band Breakaway World Tour This concert was a part of Wango Tango
November 4, 2005 The Rolling Stones Toots and the Maytals A Bigger Bang Tour 48,480 / 48,480 $6,792,416 [25]
June 17, 2011 U2 Lenny Kravitz U2 360° Tour 105,955 / 105,955 $10,790,140
June 18, 2011
July 14, 2012 Kenny Chesney
Tim McGraw
Grace Potter and the Nocturnals
Jake Owen
Brothers of the Sun Tour 44,832 / 44,832 $3,963,039
July 27, 2013 Kenny Chesney
Eric Church
Eli Young Band
Kacey Musgraves
No Shoes Nation Tour 41,447 / 41,447 $3,538,806
September 9, 2017 Chance the Rapper Be Encouraged Tour These concerts were part of the Day N Night Festival.
SZA Ctrl the Tour

Motion picture set

Several major motion pictures have been shot at Angel Stadium. The final sequence of The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad! (1988) features an electronically manipulated Reggie Jackson trying to shoot Queen Elizabeth II. Exteriors were shot at the ballpark, but most baseball scenes were shot at Dodger Stadium. The 1988 sci-fi comedy My Stepmother Is an Alien features a scene shot in Angel Stadium of Kim Basinger speaking to an extraterrestrial counsel. The 1990 comedy Taking Care of Business featured a World Series matchup between the Angels and the Chicago Cubs, with the baseball scenes in the movie having been filmed in the stadium. The Disney remake of Angels in the Outfield (1994) prominently uses the ballpark; however, many of the interior shots were filmed at the Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum. The stadium served as a stand-in for Candlestick Park in filming of The Fan (1996). Scenes from Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo and Air Bud: Seventh Inning Fetch were also filmed here.

Other events

On November 16, 1979, Anaheim Stadium hosted Motorcycle speedway when it was the venue for the American Final, a qualifying round for the 1980 Speedway World Championship. Future dual World Champion Bruce Penhall won the Final from Scott Autrey and Dennis Sigalos. Penhall and Autrey qualified to the Intercontinental Final in England held over 6 months later. Penhall qualified through to his first World Final held at the Ullevi Stadium in Gothenburg, Sweden where he finished in 5th place.

Anaheim Stadium has hosted an AMA Supercross Championship round from 1976 to 1979, 1981 to 1987, 1989 to 1996, and 1999 to the present.[26]

Angel Stadium has been the site of annual Christian Harvest Crusades since 1990.[27] It has also hosted Muslim Eid el Fitr celebrations.[7] In 2014, Barack Obama spoke at the commencement ceremony for the University of California, Irvine, which was held at the stadium to accommodate capacity and security concerns.

References

  1. ^ a b Weyler, John (April 19, 1986). "20th Anniversary . . . : The Big A : A Place Where Billy Graham, Rockers and Angels Have Tread". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 26, 2012.
  2. ^ a b Thomas, Ryland; Williamson, Samuel H. (2019). "What Was the U.S. GDP Then?". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved April 6, 2019. United States Gross Domestic Product deflator figures follow the Measuring Worth series.
  3. ^ Angel Stadium – history, photos and more of the Los Angeles Angels ballpark
  4. ^ Ballparks by Munsey and Suppes
  5. ^ Shaikin, Bill (August 30, 2013). "'Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim' could be no more". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 6, 2013.
  6. ^ a b "MLB.com". Archived from the original on May 25, 2011. Retrieved May 23, 2008.
  7. ^ a b Mellen, Greg (June 25, 2017). "20,000 Muslims Gather at Eid Prayer Celebration in Anaheim". The Orange County Register. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  8. ^ Smith, Curt (2001). Storied Stadiums. New York: Carroll & Graf. ISBN 0-7867-1187-6.
  9. ^ Busser, Bob. "Anaheim Stadium part 2 – Anaheim, California". Ballparks, Arenas and Stadiums. Archived from the original on May 18, 2015. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  10. ^ 1998 Anaheim Angels Schedule by Baseball Almanac
  11. ^ "Daktronics Photo Gallery: Angel Stadium of Anaheim".
  12. ^ http://la24-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/assets/pdf/LA2024-canditature-part2_english.pdf
  13. ^ Guardado, Maria (December 19, 2017). "Halos Will Have MLB's Third Largest Scoreboard". Major League Baseball Advanced Media. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  14. ^ Adler, David (February 20, 2018). "Angels to Lower HR Boundary of Right-Field Wall". Major League Baseball Advanced Media. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  15. ^ "Angels Baseball Adds Two Fast Casual Dining Options" (Press release). American Restaurant Holdings, Inc. April 12, 2016. Retrieved February 18, 2017.
  16. ^ Chodzko, Adam; Birch, Matt; Kay, Eric; LeVier, Corey; Schwartz, Mike (March 6, 2017). 2017 Angels Baseball Information Guide. Major League Baseball Advanced Media. p. 436.
  17. ^ Birch, Matt; Chodzko, Adam; Kay, Eric; Davidson, Katie; Weaver, Vanessa; Cali, Adam; Pluim, Lauren; Kami, Tricia; Mitrano, Dominic; Demmitt, Shane; Crane, Brett; Wiedeman, Aaron (2019). 2019 Angels Baseball Information Guide (PDF). Major League Baseball Advanced Media. p. 454. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  18. ^ Edes, Gordon (August 10, 2014). "Rapid reaction: Angels 5, Red Sox 4". ESPN. Retrieved August 10, 2014.
  19. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tables/96gc-full.html
  20. ^ a b c d Eliot, Marc (2004). To the Limit: The Untold Story of the Eagles. Da Capo Press. p. 119. Retrieved December 15, 2016.
  21. ^ Townsend, Adam (December 2, 2008). "Thom leaves a legacy of rock 'n' roll and Latino rights". The Orange County Register. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
  22. ^ http://jerrygarcia.com/show/1987-07-26-anaheim-stadium-anaheim-ca-usa/
  23. ^ Wener, Ben (February 15, 2008). "Siouxsie recapturing her wail on new tour". The Orange County Register. Retrieved September 23, 2013.
  24. ^ Hilburn, Robert (August 10, 1987). "At Anaheim Stadium: David Bowie Spins A Glitzy Web". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 23, 2013.
  25. ^ Tully, Sarah (November 18, 2005). "The Catch to close for at least a year". The Orange County Register. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
  26. ^ 2015 AMA Supercross Media Guide
  27. ^ Molina, Alejandra (August 26, 2015). "A Q & A with Harvest Crusade Founder Greg Laurie, Who Says Happiness Is Accessible to All". The Orange County Register. Retrieved March 28, 2019.

External links

2005 American League Championship Series

The 2005 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 2005 American League playoffs, which determined the 2005 American League champion, matched the Central Division champion Chicago White Sox against the West Division champion Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. The White Sox, by virtue of having the best record in the AL during the 2005 season, had the home-field advantage. The White Sox won the series four games to one to become the American League champions, and faced the Houston Astros in the 2005 World Series, in which the White Sox swept the Astros in four games to win their first World Series championship in 88 years; as a result of the 2005 All-Star Game played in Detroit, Michigan at Comerica Park on July 12, the White Sox had home-field advantage in the World Series. The series was notable both for a controversial call in Game 2 of the series, and the outstanding pitching and durability of Chicago's starting rotation, pitching four consecutive complete games; the ​ 2⁄3 of an inning Neal Cotts pitched in the first game was the only work the White Sox bullpen saw the entire series.

The White Sox and Angels were victorious in the AL Division Series (ALDS), with the White Sox defeating the defending World Champion and wild card qualifier Boston Red Sox three games to none, and the Angels defeating the Eastern Division champion New York Yankees three games to two. It was the first ALCS since 2002 not to feature the Red Sox and the Yankees.

2005 Los Angeles Angels season

The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 2005 season was the franchise's 45th since its inception. The regular season ended with a record of 95-67, resulting in the Angels winning the American League West division title for the second consecutive season, its fifth in franchise history.

In the postseason, the Angels defeated the New York Yankees in the American League Division Series, 3-2, but were subsequently defeated by the eventual World Series champion Chicago White Sox in the American League Championship Series, 4-1.

The season was the first the team played under its controversial "Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim" moniker.

2006 Los Angeles Angels season

The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 2006 season started with the team trying to win their 3rd consecutive AL West title. However, they came short, finishing in second place with a record of 89–73. But the biggest story of the year was longtime Angels mainstay Tim Salmon playing his final season. Towards the end of the season, not only were the fans excited with trying to get into the playoffs in the final month of the season, but they were excited about Salmon trying to hit his 300th home run. Eventually, he ended with 299, one short of the milestone.

2007 Los Angeles Angels season

The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 2007 season was the franchise's 47th season since inception. The regular season ended with a record of 94–68 and the Angels winning the American League West division title for the sixth time. However, the Angels' playoff run quickly ended, as they were swept by the Boston Red Sox in the American League Division Series, just as they were in 2004

2008 Los Angeles Angels season

The 2008 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim season was the 48th season for the franchise. The regular season ended with the Angels winning their seventh American League West division title and setting a franchise record for single-season wins. In the postseason, they were once again defeated by the Boston Red Sox in the American League Division Series, the same team that defeated them in the 2004 and 2007 ALDS, as well as the 1986 ALCS.

General manager Bill Stoneman retired at the end of the 2007 season and was replaced by relative newcomer Tony Reagins. Reagins quickly made two headline roster moves, trading shortstop Orlando Cabrera to the Chicago White Sox for starting pitcher Jon Garland, and signing free agent outfielder Torii Hunter. Partway through the season the Angels traded first baseman Casey Kotchman to the Atlanta Braves for Mark Teixeira.

On September 10, the Angels clinched the American League West division title, their seventh in franchise history, and became the earliest team to clinch the division in its history. Three days later, closing pitcher Francisco Rodríguez broke the single-season save record with his 58th save.

2009 Los Angeles Angels season

The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim's 2009 season was the franchise's 49th season. The Angels began the season as the two-time defending American League West division champions.

Perhaps the most notable player to depart in the offseason due to free agency was longtime closing pitcher Francisco Rodríguez, who signed with the New York Mets. Other notable free agent departures were 2008 acquisitions Jon Garland (Arizona Diamondbacks) and Mark Teixeira (New York Yankees). Notable free agent acquisitions included new closer Brian Fuentes, previously of the Colorado Rockies, and Bobby Abreu, previously of the Yankees.

Tragedy struck the Angels twice this season. Preston Gómez, the team's special assistant to the general manager, died January 13 of injuries sustained when he was struck by a car in Blythe, California, on March 26, 2008. As a tribute, the Angels began the season wearing black "PRESTON" patches on their left sleeve. Then, on April 9, rookie pitcher Nick Adenhart was killed in a car accident in Fullerton, California, hours after pitching 6 shutout innings against the Oakland Athletics in his first start of the season. As a tribute, the Angels continued to assign a locker to Adenhart at home and on the road, hang a jersey with his name and number in their dugout, and wear black patches with his name and number on their left breast for the rest of the season.

On September 28, the Angels clinched the American League West division title, their eighth in franchise history.

2010 Los Angeles Angels season

The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim' 2010 season is the franchise's 50th season and 45th in Anaheim. The Angels began this season as the three-time defending American League West division champions. During the 2010 season, the Angels hosted MLB All-Star Game at Angel Stadium for the third time in franchise history.

2010 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2010 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 81st midseason exhibition between the All-Stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 13, 2010, at Angel Stadium of Anaheim, the home of the American League Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, and was telecast by Fox Sports in the US, with Joe Buck and Tim McCarver in the broadcast booth. Fox also teamed with DirecTV to produce a separate 3D broadcast, the first ever for a network Major League Baseball game. Kenny Albert and Mark Grace called the 3D telecast. ESPN Radio also broadcast the game, with Jon Sciambi and Dave Campbell announcing. The National League won the game 3–1, ending a 13-game winless streak.This was the third All-Star Game hosted by the city of Anaheim, California, which previously hosted the game in 1967 and 1989. From 2003-16, the winning team earned home field advantage for the World Series. This was the first All Star Game the National League won since 1996, giving the NL said advantage in the World Series for the first time since 2001 – ironically, the winning pitcher, Washington Nationals closer Matt Capps, would go on to participate in the American League playoffs after his trade to the Minnesota Twins just a couple of weeks following the Midsummer Classic.

A short memorial honoring George Steinbrenner, the owner of the New York Yankees who died early that morning, was held prior to the game.

2011 Los Angeles Angels season

The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim' 2011 season was the franchise's 51st season and 46th in Anaheim. The Angels began the season following a disappointing 2010 campaign where they missed the postseason for the first time since 2006, after winning the American League West three times in a row from 2007–2009. During the 2011 season, the Angels celebrated the franchise's 50th anniversary and because it was the "golden Anniversary", a gold trim was added to the uniforms including the halo on both the cap and uniform (the halo from 1993–1996, 2002–2010 was silver and gold prior to that). The date of the franchise's actual 50th anniversary is December 6, 2010.

2012 Los Angeles Angels season

The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim's 2012 season was the franchise's 52nd season and 47th in Anaheim (all of them at Angel Stadium of Anaheim). The Angels would miss the playoffs for the 3rd straight, even though they had an 89-73 record as a 3rd seed team in the AL West.

Anaheim, California

Anaheim () is a city in Orange County, California, part of the Los Angeles metropolitan area. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city had a population of 336,265, making it the most populous city in Orange County and the 10th-most populous city in California. Anaheim is the second-largest city in Orange County in terms of land area, and is known for being the home of the Disneyland Resort, the Anaheim Convention Center, and two major sports teams: the Anaheim Ducks ice hockey club and the Los Angeles Angels baseball team.

Anaheim was founded by fifty German families in 1857 and incorporated as the second city in Los Angeles County on March 18, 1876; Orange County was split off from Los Angeles County in 1889. Anaheim remained largely an agricultural community until Disneyland opened in 1955. This led to the construction of several hotels and motels around the area, and residential districts in Anaheim soon followed. The city also developed into an industrial center, producing electronics, aircraft parts and canned fruit. Anaheim is a charter city.Anaheim's city limits extend almost the full width of Orange County, from Cypress in the west, twenty miles east to the Riverside County line in the east, encompass a diverse range of neighborhoods. In the west, mid-20th-century tract houses predominate. Downtown Anaheim has three mixed-use historic districts, the largest of which is the Anaheim Colony. South of downtown, a center of commercial activity of regional importance begins, the Anaheim–Santa Ana edge city, which stretches east and south into the cities of Orange, Santa Ana and Garden Grove. This edge city includes the Disneyland Resort, with two theme parks, multiple hotels, and retail district; Disney is part of the larger Anaheim Resort district with numerous other hotels and retail complexes. The Platinum Triangle, a neo-urban redevelopment district surrounding Angel Stadium, which is planned to be populated with mixed-use streets and high-rises. Further east, Anaheim Canyon is an industrial district north of the Riverside Freeway and east of the Orange Freeway. The city's eastern third consists of Anaheim Hills, an affluent community built to a master plan, and open land east of the 241 tollway.

Big A Sign

The Big A Sign is a 230-foot-tall (70 m), 210-ton red metal sign in the shape of the letter "A" with a halo on top (mirroring the Los Angeles Angels logo), situated in the parking lot of Angel Stadium in Anaheim, California. The sign was originally installed in 1966 behind the left field fence but was moved to the parking lot in 1979 when American football's Los Angeles Rams started sharing the stadium with MLB's Los Angeles Angels. The sign is also responsible for the nickname of Angel Stadium as "The Big A".The halo lights up after every Angels win (regardless of whether it happens at home or on the road), which gives rise to the catchphrase "Light That Baby Up!" amongst Angels fans. (When Dick Enberg was an Angels broadcaster in the 1970s, he would punctuate the team's victories with the phrase "And the halo shines tonight!")

City National Grove of Anaheim

The City National Grove of Anaheim is an indoor, live music venue in Anaheim, California operated by Nederlander Concerts of Los Angeles. Its approximate capacity is 1,700.

Less than two miles (3.2 km) from the Disneyland Resort, the Grove is just to the east of Interstate 5 on Katella Avenue. The Grove sits on the northwest corner of the parking lot of Angel Stadium of Anaheim, home of Major League Baseball's Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. It is also located near the Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center with Amtrak and Metrolink service.

It originally opened as the ill-fated Tinseltown, an awards show-themed restaurant. After converting to a concert venue, it was renamed The Sun Theatre for a short time before changing its name to The Grove of Anaheim. On January 24, 2011, the venue again changed its name to City National Grove of Anaheim, following the agreement of a five-year, $1.25 million naming rights deal with City National Bank.Among the artists that have performed here are Bob Dylan, B.B. King, Air Supply, Enrique Bunbury, Julio Iglesias, Boz Scaggs, Merle Haggard, George Lopez, Jamie Foxx, Seal, MattyBRaps, Something Corporate, Live, Everclear, and Jaguares.

City of Anaheim v. Angels Baseball LP

City of Anaheim v. Angels Baseball LP is a lawsuit filed in Orange County, California Superior Court by the city of Anaheim, California against the owners of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim Major League Baseball franchise, concerning the team's official name. The lawsuit and a related political and public relations battle sought to reverse the team's official name change from Anaheim Angels to Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, which the city characterized as a breach of the team's lease on the city-owned Angel Stadium of Anaheim. The city was unsuccessful, as both a trial jury and an appellate court ruled in the team's favor.

The Angels franchise was founded as the Los Angeles Angels in 1961 and played under that name until 1965, when it changed its name to California Angels upon its move from Los Angeles' Dodger Stadium to the new Anaheim Stadium (now Angel Stadium of Anaheim). In 1996, the Angels and the city of Anaheim agreed on a new lease that called for the city to fund renovations to Anaheim Stadium, and called for the team's name to contain the name "Anaheim". The following year, the team's official name changed again to Anaheim Angels.

In 2003, the team was sold to Arturo "Arte" Moreno. Less than two years later, the team announced it was changing its name to Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, an attempt to market the team as being from Southern California—Major League Baseball's second-largest media market—rather than just Orange County. The "of Anaheim" phrase was included to comply with the terms of the 1996 lease. Anaheim city officials immediately denounced the change, characterizing it as a breach of the lease. Likewise, many fans denounced the change, as many Orange County residents consider Orange County to have its own identity separate from Los Angeles.

A preliminary injunction filed by the city seeking to immediately reverse the name change was unsuccessful, and the Angels began playing under the new name for the 2007 season.

List of Los Angeles Angels Opening Day starting pitchers

The Los Angeles Angels are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Anaheim, California. They play in the American League West division. The franchise has also gone by the names "Los Angeles Angels", "California Angels" and "Anaheim Angels" at various points in its history. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Angels have used 25 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 51 seasons. The 25 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 26 wins, 18 losses and 7 no decisions. No decisions are awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game. It can also result if a starting pitcher does not pitch five full innings, even if his team retains the lead and wins.Jered Weaver has the most Opening Day starts for the Angels, with seven, and had 6 consecutive opening day starts from 2010-2015. He has a record of three wins and two losses, with one no decision in those starts that resulted in a win. Mike Witt has the second most starts, with five, with one win, three loses, and one no decision that resulted in a loss. Frank Tanana, Mark Langston and Chuck Finley have all made four Opening Day starts for the Angels. Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan, Bartolo Colón and Jered Weaver have each made three such starts for the Angels.Nolan Ryan has the Angels record for most wins in Opening Day starts with three. He also has the best win–loss record in Opening Day starts for the Angels, which is 3–0. The other Angels pitchers with multiple wins in Opening Day starts without a loss are Ken McBride and Andy Messersmith. Mike Witt has the record for most losses in Opening Day starts for the Angels with three. Frank Tanana and Chuck Finley each had two such losses.The Angels have played in three home ball parks. They played their first season in Wrigley Field, which was designed to look like Wrigley Field in Chicago, but never played an Opening Day home game there. In 1962, they moved to Dodger Stadium, but only stayed there through 1965. They played two Opening Day games at Dodger Stadium, winning once and losing once. The Angels finally moved to Angel Stadium of Anaheim in 1966, which was first called Anaheim Stadium, then subsequently renamed Edison International Field of Anaheim later. They have played 29 Opening Day games there, and their starting pitchers have 15 wins and 12 losses with 2 no decisions. This makes their record at home in Opening Day games 15 wins and 13 losses with 2 no decisions. In Opening Day games on the road, their starting pitchers have a record of 10 wins and 5 losses with 5 no decisions.The Angels have played in one World Series championship in their history, which they won in 2002. Jarrod Washburn was the Angels Opening Day starting pitcher that season. The Angels lost that Opening Day game to the Cleveland Indians. The winning pitcher for the Indians in that game was Bartolo Colón, who would make three Opening Day starts for the Angels later in his career.

List of current Major League Baseball stadiums

The following is a list of Major League Baseball stadiums, their locations, their first year of usage and home teams.

The newest Major League Baseball (MLB) ballpark is SunTrust Park in Cumberland, Georgia, home of the Atlanta Braves, which opened for the 2017 season. Fenway Park in Boston, home of the Boston Red Sox, is the oldest, having opened in 1912.

Nine MLB stadiums do not have corporate naming rights deals: Angel Stadium, Dodger Stadium, Fenway Park, Kauffman Stadium, Marlins Park, Nationals Park, Oriole Park at Camden Yards, Wrigley Field, and Yankee Stadium.

Los Angeles Angels

The Los Angeles Angels are an American professional baseball franchise based in Anaheim, California. The Angels compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) West division. The Angels have played home games at Angel Stadium since 1966. The current MLB franchise was established as an expansion team in 1961 by Gene Autry (1907–1998), the team's first owner. Autry was a famous singing cowboy actor in a series of films in the 1930s to 1950s, and later was the subject of the Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum. The "Angels" name was taken by Autry in tribute to the previous original Los Angeles Angels, a Minor League franchise in the Pacific Coast League (PCL), which played in South Central Los Angeles from 1903 to 1957. He bought the rights to the Angels name from Walter O'Malley, the then-Los Angeles Dodgers owner, who acquired the PCL franchise from Philip K. Wrigley, also the owner of the parent Chicago Cubs at the time, as part of the Dodgers' move to Southern California.

Nick Adenhart

Nicholas James Adenhart (August 24, 1986 – April 9, 2009) was an American right-handed baseball starting pitcher who played two seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. In four career games, Adenhart pitched 18 innings and posted a win-loss record of 1–0, with nine strikeouts and a 6.00 earned run average (ERA).

A graduate of Williamsport High School, Adenhart was highly touted as a high school prospect until an injury in his final game required Tommy John surgery. He was drafted by the Angels in the 14th round of the 2004 Major League Baseball draft, and began playing in their minor league system after the surgery was a success. He spent three full seasons in the minor leagues before making his major league debut on May 1, 2008. After appearing in three games, Adenhart spent the rest of 2008 in the minor leagues developing his skills, and in 2009 he earned a spot in the Angels' starting rotation.

Just after pitching his first start of 2009, Adenhart was killed in a collision with a drunk driver. Both the Angels and the Salt Lake Bees, for whom Adenhart played in 2008, suspended their next games. There were many tributes to him over the course of the season, including his former teammates celebrating with him by spraying champagne and beer on one of his jerseys after they clinched the 2009 American League West division championship.

Platinum Triangle, Anaheim

The Platinum Triangle is a district of Anaheim, California that is undergoing transformation from a low-density commercial and industrial zone into a more urban environment with high-density housing, commercial office towers, and retail space. The 820 acres (330 ha) area undergoing this large-scale redevelopment includes the city's two major sports venues, the Honda Center and Angel Stadium of Anaheim.

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