Andy Uram

Andrew "Andy" Uram Jr. (March 21, 1915 – December 9, 1984) was a running back and defensive back in the National Football League who played for the Green Bay Packers.[1] Uram played collegiate ball for the University of Minnesota before being drafted by the Packers in the 6th round of the 1938 NFL Draft. He played professionally for six seasons from 1938 to 1943.[2] After the 1943 NFL season, Uram served in the United States Navy during World War II. In 1973, Uram was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame.[3] He died in 1984, at the age of 69.[4]

Andy Uram
No. 42
Position:Halfback
Personal information
Born:March 21, 1915
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US
Died:December 9, 1984 (aged 69)
Green Bay, Wisconsin
Career information
College:Minnesota
NFL Draft:1938 / Round: 6 / Pick: 47
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Yards:2156
Touchdowns:15
Interceptions:9
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ "Packers.com - Andy Uram". Packers.com. Archived from the original on 2 January 2009. Retrieved January 29, 2009.
  2. ^ "Andy Uram Statistics". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 30 December 2008. Retrieved January 29, 2009.
  3. ^ "Inductee Andy Uram". Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame. Retrieved January 29, 2009.
  4. ^ "Andy Uram Obituary". New York Times. December 11, 1984. Retrieved January 29, 2009.

External links

1936 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1936 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1936 Big Ten Conference football season.

1936 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1936 Big Ten Conference football season was the 41st season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1936 college football season.

The 1936 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, under head coach Bernie Bierman, compiled a 7–1 record and was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll, giving Minnesota its third consecutive national championship. Tackle Ed Widseth was a consensus first-team All-American and was the first Big Ten player taken in the 1937 NFL Draft with the fourth overall pick.

The 1936 Northwestern Wildcats football team, under head coach Pappy Waldorf, compiled a 7–1 record, won the Big Ten championship, and was ranked No. 7 in the final AP Poll. The team's only loss came on the last day of the season against Notre Dame. Guard Steve Reid was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1936 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Francis Schmidt, compiled a 5–3 record, led the Big Ten in scoring defense (3.4 points allowed per game), and outscored opponents 160 to 27. End Merle Wendt, tackle Charley Hamrick, and guard Inwood Smith were first-team All-Big Ten players.

1936 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1936 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1936 college football season. In their fifth year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled a 7–1 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 203 to 32. The team was named national champion by eight NCAA-designated major selectors in Associated Press, Billingsley Report, Dickinson System, Dunkel System, Helms Athletic Foundation, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, and Poling System. This marked the third consecutive year the team was selected as national champion.

Tackle Ed Widseth was named an All-American by Collier's/Grantland Rice, Associated Press, INS, NEA, New York Sun, Look Magazine, New York Morning Telegram, Hearst, United Press International and Paramount News. Widseth and halfback Andy Uram were named All-Big Ten first team.Ed Widseth was awarded the Team MVP award.Total attendance for the season was 247,653, which averaged to 49,531. The season high for attendance was against Iowa.

1937 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1937 Big Ten Conference football season was the 42nd season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1937 college football season.

The 1937 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, under head coach Bernie Bierman, won the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (23.0 points per game), compiled a 6–2 record, and was ranked No. 5 in the final AP poll. End Ray King was named a first-team All-American by two selectors, and fullback Andy Uram was received first-team honors from the Associated Press. Halfback Rudy Gmitro was awarded the team's most valuable player award.

The 1937 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Francis Schmidt finished in second place with a 6–2 record, shut out six of eight opponents, led the Big Ten in scoring defense (2.9 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 8 in the final AP poll. Guard Gust Zarnas was selected as a first-team All-American by three selectors. Back Jim McDonald was the second player selected in the 1938 NFL Draft.

Corbett Davis of Indiana won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Big Ten's most valuable player. He was also the first player selected in the 1938 NFL Draft.

1937 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1937 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1937 Big Ten Conference football season. In their sixth year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–2 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 184 to 50.End Ray King was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation and Look magazine. Fullback Andy Uram was named an All-American by the Associated Press. King, halfback Rudy Gmitro, tackle Lou Midler and guard Frank Twedell were named All-Big Ten first team.Rudy Gmitro was awarded the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 254,188, which averaged to 50,838. The season high for attendance was against Notre Dame.

1939 Green Bay Packers season

The 1939 Green Bay Packers season was their 21st season overall and their 19th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–2 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season by beating the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game 27–0, earning the Packers their fifth NFL Championship and the first title game shutout ever recorded.

1942 Green Bay Packers season

The 1942 Green Bay Packers season was their 24th season overall and their 22nd season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–2–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

1944 Camp Peary Pirates football team

The 1944 Camp Peary Pirates football team represented Camp Peary during the 1944 college football season. The team compiled a 5–2 record.Red Strader, who was coach of the Saint Mary's Gaels football team before the war, was the head coach.

The team garnered attention when, shortly before the season began, the Navy assigned eight former NFL players to Camp Peary. The eight included halfbacks Joe Vodicka, Andy Uram, Len Janiak, and Bob Morrow, fullback Joe Bokant, center Al Matuza, and tackle Bob Bjorklund. Other notable players on the team included ends Ralph Schilling and Gregg Browning and tackle Russ Letlow who was later named to the NFL 1930s All-Decade Team.

Bob Monnett

Robert C. Monnett (February 27, 1910 – August 2, 1978) was a professional American football player who played halfback for six seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973.

Charley Brock

Charles Jacob "Charley" Brock (March 15, 1916 – May 25, 1987) was an American football center and linebacker.

Gerry Ellis

Gerry Ellis (born November 12, 1957

in Columbia, Missouri) is a former professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the Green Bay Packers.

Hank Bruder

Henry George "Hank" Bruder Jr. (November 22, 1907 – June 29, 1970) was an American football player in the National Football League. He played nine years with the Green Bay Packers from 1931 to 1939 and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1972. Bruder attended Northwestern University, where he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity.He was part of the offensive line that blocked for Pro Football Hall of Fame back Johnny "Blood" McNally.

Hank Gremminger

Charles Henry "Hank" Gremminger (September 1, 1933 – November 2, 2001) was an American football player, a defensive back in the National Football League for eleven seasons. He played ten seasons for the Green Bay Packers (1956–1965) and one for the Los Angeles Rams in 1966.

Johnnie Gray

Johnnie Lee Gray (born December 18, 1953) is an American retired professional football player. Gray was a safety in the National Football League with the Green Bay Packers.

Mike Douglass (American football)

Michael Reese Douglass (born March 15, 1955 in St. Louis, Missouri) is a former American football player. He played outside linebacker for the Green Bay Packers (1978–1985) and the San Diego Chargers (1986) in the National Football League. He ranks third in the lists of tackles made by a Packers player.

Nate Barragar

Nathan Robert Barragar (June 3, 1907 – August 10, 1985) was an American collegiate and professional football player.

Pete Tinsley

Elijah Pope "Pete" Tinsley (March 16, 1913 – May 11, 1995) was a professional football player, born in Sumter, South Carolina, who played guard, defense and offense for eight seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1979.

Uram

Uram is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Andy Uram (1915–1984), American football player

Marek Uram (born 1974), Slovak ice hockey player

Mihail Uram (born 1924), Hungarian footballer

Paul Uram, American gymnastics coach

Whitey Woodin

Howard Lee "Whitey" Woodin (January 29, 1894 – February 7, 1974) was an American football player. He played with the Racine Legion and the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973. After retiring from football, Woodin remained in Green Bay and worked for many years at Falls Power and Paper Company.

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