Andy Etchebarren

Andrew Auguste Etchebarren (born June 20, 1943) is an American former professional baseball player and minor league manager. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball (MLB) for a total of 15 seasons for the Baltimore Orioles (1962 and 1965–75), California Angels (1975–77) and Milwaukee Brewers (1978).

Andy Etchebarren
Catcher
Born: June 20, 1943 (age 76)
Whittier, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 26, 1962, for the Baltimore Orioles
Last MLB appearance
April 20, 1978, for the Milwaukee Brewers
MLB statistics
Batting average.235
Home runs49
Runs batted in309
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Playing career

Etchebarren was born in Whittier, California of Basque descent. He was signed by the Baltimore Orioles as an amateur free agent in 1961. Expected to be the Orioles' third-string catcher entering his MLB rookie season in 1966, he became the starter in spring training when Dick Brown underwent surgery to remove a brain tumor, and Charley Lau underwent surgery to remedy an ailing elbow in the same timeframe.[1] Etchebarren was the last man to ever bat against Sandy Koufax, when he hit into a double play during the sixth inning of Game 2 of the 1966 World Series. Etchebarren helped the Orioles to win the 1966 and 1970 World Series, 1969 and 1971 AL pennants, and the 1973 and 1974 AL Eastern Division championships.

He was named to the 1966 and 1967 AL All-Star Teams. Etchebarren finished 17th in voting for the 1966 AL MVP for playing in 121 games, having 412 at bats, 49 runs, 91 hits, 14 doubles, 6 triples, 11 home runs, 50 RBI, 38 walks, a .221 batting average, a .293 on-base percentage, a .364 slugging percentage, 150 total bases, 3 sacrifice flies, and 12 intentional walks.

In 15 seasons he played in 948 games and had 2,618 at-bats, 245 runs, 615 hits, 101 doubles, 17 triples, 49 home runs, 309 RBI, 13 stolen bases, 246 walks, .235 batting average, .306 on-base percentage, .343 slugging percentage, 897 total bases, 20 sacrifice hits, 19 sacrifice flies and 41 intentional walks.

Managerial career

In 2000 Etchebarren was manager of the Bowie Baysox of the Eastern League, in 2001 and 2002 Rochester Red Wings of the International League. He served as manager of the Aberdeen IronBirds of the New York–Penn League for three seasons until his dismissal from that position on October 22, 2007. He was the manager of the York Revolution of the Atlantic League, and retired from baseball following the 2012 season.

References

  1. ^ "Andy Etchebarren Accepts Oriole Pact," The Associated Press, Thursday, January 19, 1967.

External links

Preceded by
Chuck Cottier
Baltimore Orioles Bench Coach
1996–1997
Succeeded by
Eddie Murray
Preceded by
Tommy Shields
Frederick Keys Manager
1999
Succeeded by
Dave Machemer
Preceded by
Joe Ferguson
Bowie Baysox Manager
2000
Succeeded by
Dave Machemer
1962 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1962 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses.

1965 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1965 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 3rd in the American League with a record of 94 wins and 68 losses.

1966 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1966 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing first in the American League with a record of 97 wins and 63 losses, nine games ahead of the runner-up Minnesota Twins. It was their first AL pennant since 1944, when the club was known as the St. Louis Browns. The Orioles swept the NL champion Los Angeles Dodgers in four games to register their first-ever World Series title. The team was managed by Hank Bauer, and played their home games at Memorial Stadium. They drew 1,203,366 fans to their home ballpark, third in the ten-team league. It would be the highest home attendance of the team's first quarter-century at Memorial Stadium, and was eclipsed by the pennant-winning 1979 Orioles.

1967 Baltimore Orioles season

After winning the World Series the previous year, the 1967 Baltimore Orioles plummeted to a sixth-place finish in the American League with a record of 76 wins and 85 losses, 15½ games behind the AL champion Boston Red Sox. The team was managed by Hank Bauer, and played their home games at Memorial Stadium.

1968 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1968 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses, 12 games behind the AL and World Series champion Detroit Tigers. The team was managed by Hank Bauer, until he was replaced right after the All-Star break by Earl Weaver. The Orioles' home games were played at Memorial Stadium.

Following the season, it was announced that the American League, along with the National League, would be split into two divisions for the 1969 season in order to accommodate the admittance of two new franchises to each league. The Orioles were assigned to the new American League East division.

1970 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1970 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing first in the American League East with a record of 108 wins and 54 losses, 15 games ahead of the runner-up New York Yankees. The Orioles swept the Minnesota Twins for the second straight year in the American League Championship Series. They then went on to win their second World Series title over the National League champion Cincinnati Reds in five games, thanks to the glove of third baseman Brooks Robinson.

The team was managed by Earl Weaver, and played their home games at Memorial Stadium.

1971 Baltimore Orioles season

In 1971, the Baltimore Orioles finished first in the American League East, with a record of 101 wins and 57 losses. As of 2016, the 1971 Orioles are one of only two Major League Baseball clubs (the 1920 Chicago White Sox being the other) to have four 20-game winners in a season: Jim Palmer, Dave McNally, Mike Cuellar, and Pat Dobson.

1972 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1972 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing third in the American League East with a record of 80 wins and 74 losses.

1973 American League Championship Series

The 1973 American League Championship Series took place between October 6 and 11, 1973. The Oakland Athletics defeated the Baltimore Orioles, three games to two. Games 1 and 2 were played in Memorial Stadium in Baltimore; Games 3–5 were played at the Oakland Coliseum. It was the second match-up between the two teams in the ALCS.

1973 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1973 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing first in the American League East with a record of 97 wins and 65 losses. They went on to lose to the Oakland Athletics in the 1973 American League Championship Series, three games to two.

1973 Oakland Athletics season

The 1973 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's winning their third consecutive American League West title with a record of 94 wins and 68 losses. The A's went on to defeat the Baltimore Orioles in the ALCS for their second straight AL Championship, and won the World Series in seven games over the New York Mets to take their second consecutive World Championship.

1974 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1974 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing first in the American League East with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses. The Orioles went on to lose to the Oakland Athletics in the 1974 American League Championship Series, 3 games to 1.

1975 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1975 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing 2nd in the American League East with a record of 90 wins and 69 losses.

1977 California Angels season

The 1977 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing fifth in the American League West with a record of 74 wins and 88 losses.

1978 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1978 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers finishing third in the American League East with a record of 93 wins and 69 losses.

1984 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1984 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected three: Luis Aparicio, Don Drysdale, and Harmon Killebrew.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected two players, Rick Ferrell and Pee Wee Reese.

1984 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1984 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing 7th in the American League East with a record of 67 wins and 94 losses.

Dave Machemer

David Ritchie Machemer (born May 24, 1951 in St. Joseph, Michigan) is an American professional baseball scout, and a former professional player and minor league manager. He played in 29 games, mostly as a second baseman, over two seasons (1978–79) for the California Angels and Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball. He is currently a special assignment scout for the Baltimore Orioles.Machemer is a native of St. Joseph, Michigan. His pro career began in June 1972 when he was selected by the Angels in the fourth round of the amateur draft. He threw and batted right-handed, stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 180 pounds (82 kg). Over his 11-season minor league playing career, he batted .277 with 1,078 hits in 1,126 games played.

York Revolution

The York Revolution is an American professional baseball team based in York, Pennsylvania. It is a member of the Freedom Division of the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball, an independent league not affiliated with Major League Baseball. From the 2007 season to the present, the Revolution has played its home games at PeoplesBank Park, located in the Arch Street neighborhood. The team has won the league championship three times, most recently over the Long Island Ducks on September 29, 2017.Before the Revolution's inaugural season, baseball fans in York had waited 38 years for the return of the sport since the York White Roses folded after the 1969 season. In 2006, Yorkers chose the name "Revolution" in a team-sponsored fan ballot. The name originally referred to the city's colonial heritage, especially because the Continental Congress passed the Articles of Confederation in York during the Revolutionary War. At the time of the American Revolution, York was one of the first capitals of the United States. In 2012, the Revolution unveiled a new brand to emphasize York's more recent contributions to the Industrial Revolution with a secondary emphasis on patriotism. The region is home to industrial manufacturers such as Harley-Davidson, Stauffer's, and York International/Johnson Controls. Many Yorkers also see the Revolution name as a symbol of the city's renaissance efforts.

Revolution managers
The Club
Ballpark
Culture
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Important figures
Retired numbers
Key personnel
Championships (2)

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