Andrew I. Porter

Andrew Ian Porter, (born March 24, 1946), is an American editor, publisher and active science fiction fan.

Andrew Porter Hugo 1993
Andrew Porter with the Best Semiprozine Hugo Award at the 1993 Worldcon
Andrew Porter 2006
Andrew Porter in 2006

Background

Born Andrew Ian Silverberg on March 24, 1946 in Detroit, Michigan, he moved to New York City with his mother and brother in 1956 upon the death of his father the previous year. His name was legally changed in 1964 when his mother remarried.[1] He was a student at Milford Academy, which at the time was operating as a boys' prep school.

Fandom

Porter entered science fiction fandom in 1960. He had been calling science fiction writers in the Bronx and Manhattan telephone books to discuss science fiction, and Donald Wollheim put him in touch with local science fiction fandom in New York City. He became active in fan groups including the Lunarians, FISTFA (the Fannish Insurgent, Scientifiction Association) and the Fanoclasts, then hosted by Ted White. In 1960 he had his first news-related column on upcoming paperbacks, printed in James V. Taurasi's Science Fiction Times.[2]

He published many different fanzines, beginning with Algol, including the newszine S.F.Weekly from 1966–68. He started his semiprozine Science Fiction Chronicle in 1979. He has attended hundreds of science fiction conventions and nearly 40 World Science Fiction Conventions (Worldcons) since his first in 1963. He worked on conventions in the US, Canada and overseas, and was on the central committee of the 1967 Worldcon, NYCon 3. With John Bangsund, he was responsible for Australia hosting its first Worldcon. He was Fan Guest of Honor at several conventions, most notably the 1990 Worldcon, ConFiction. He won the fanzine Hugo in 1974 for his fanzine/semiprozine Algol (later renamed Starship), and the semiprozine Hugo in 1993 and 1994 for Science Fiction Chronicle. He has a total of twenty-three additional nominations for Best Fanzine or Best Semipro Zine.[3] In 1991, he received a Special Committee Award at the Worldcon, for Distinguished Semiprozine Work; in 1992 he received a Special British Fantasy Award. He sold Science Fiction Chronicle to DNA Publications in May 2000 and was fired in 2002. In 2006, he was diagnosed with liver bile duct cancer, for which he was operated on successfully in 2007, followed by five months of chemotherapy. He is now cancer free. At the 2009 Worldcon in Montreal, Anticipation, he received the Big Heart Award.[4] In 2010, he finally realized his dream of going to an Australian WorldCon, AussieCon IV.

Professional work

In publishing, he was a proofreader and copy editor, was assistant editor on The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction from 1966–74, associate editor at the paperback publisher Lancer Books in the late 1960s, and was a trade magazine editor and advertising production manager on such titles as Rudder, Quick Frozen Foods (under editor Sam Moskowitz), QFF International, Construction Equipment, and Electro-Procurement. He was editor/designer/publisher of The Book of Ellison, a hardcover/trade paperback published to honor Harlan Ellison’s 1978 stint as Worldcon Pro Guest of Honor. His other publications, under the Algol Press imprint, are Dreams Must Explain Themselves by Ursula K. Le Guin, Exploring Cordwainer Smith, Experiment Perilous: The Art and Science of Anguish In Science Fiction (with essays by Marion Zimmer Bradley, Alfred Bester and Norman Spinrad), and The Fiction of James Tiptree, Jr. by Gardner Dozois. He has sold articles and photos to Publishers Weekly, Omni, and The New York Times. He is a New York City resident.

Sources

References

  1. ^ Porter, Andy. "Why I Am A Fan" Idle Minds 4 (August 8, 2009), p. 34
  2. ^ Porter, Andy. "Why I Am A Fan" Idle Minds 4 (August 8, 2009), pp. 34-35
  3. ^ List of Hugo nominees and winners
  4. ^ "Locus Big Heart Wins by Year". Retrieved 2009-08-25.

External links

1977 in comics

Notable events of 1977 in comics. See also List of years in comics.

48th World Science Fiction Convention

The 48th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), was ConFiction, which was held in The Hague, Netherlands 23rd-27 August 1990 at the Netherlands Congress Centre. This convention was one of the two Worldcons held in continental Europe, the other being the 28th World Science Fiction Convention held in West Germany.

49th World Science Fiction Convention

The 49th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Chicon V, was held August 29–September 2, 1991, at the Hyatt Regency Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, USA. The convention was chaired by Kathleen Meyer. Total attendance was reported as 5,661 members.

51st World Science Fiction Convention

The 51st World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as ConFrancisco, was held September 2–6, 1993, at the ANA Hotel, Parc Fifty Five, and Nikko Hotels, and the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco, California, United States.

The supporting organization was San Francisco Science Fiction Conventions, Inc. The chairman was David W. Clark. The Guests of Honor (called "Honored Guests") were Larry Niven, Alicia Austin, Tom Digby, Jan Howard Finder, and Mark Twain (Dead GoH). Mark Twain was "channeled" by Jon deCles. The toastmaster was Guy Gavriel Kay. Total attendance was 6,602, of 7,725 paid memberships.

ConFrancisco was the last Worldcon not to have its own official website.The original plan of San Francisco Science Fiction Conventions, Inc. was to hold the convention at the futuristic San Francisco Marriott Marquis, designed by the noted architect Anthony J. Lumsden, which is topped with a jukebox shaped glass tower that makes it look like a skyscraper from a Flash Gordon comic strip by Alex Raymond. This building is a notable example of futurist architecture. However, the hotel backed out of the contract when a more lucrative larger convention wanted to schedule there on the same weekend.

52nd World Science Fiction Convention

The 1994 Hugo Awards were presented for work in 1993:

The 52nd World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as ConAdian, was held 1–5 September 1994 at the Crowne Plaza, Place Louis Riel, and Sheraton hotels, and the Winnipeg Convention Centre in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.The chairman was John Mansfield. The Guests of Honor were Anne McCaffrey (pro), George Barr (artist), and Robert Runte (fan). The toastmaster was Barry B. Longyear. Total attendance was approximately 3,570.

ConAdian was the first Worldcon with its own official website.

56th World Science Fiction Convention

BucConeer was the 56th World Science Fiction Convention, held in Baltimore, Maryland, United States, on August 5–9, 1998. The convention was held in the Baltimore Convention Center, as well as the Baltimore Marriott Inner Harbor, the Holiday Inn Inner Harbor, the Omni Inner Harbor Baltimore (now the Wyndham), and the Baltimore Hilton and Towers. The convention was chaired by Peggy Rae Pavlat.

Cele Goldsmith Lalli

Cele Goldsmith Lalli (1933 – January 14, 2002) was an American editor. She was the editor of Amazing Stories from 1959 to 1965, Fantastic from 1958 to 1965, and later the Editor-in-Chief of Modern Bride magazine.

Granfalloon (fanzine)

Granfalloon was a science fiction fanzine published by Linda Bushyager. It was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine in 1972, losing to Locus; and 1973 (losing to Energumen).

The first issue was published in 1966 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Suzanne Tompkins was co-editor for the first six issues. Twenty issues of Granfalloon were released, the last one in July 1976.Contributors included Piers Anthony, Alicia Austin, Bill Bowers, Ron Bushyager, Grant Canfield, Don D'Ammassa, Steve Fabian, Alexis Gilliland, Mike Glicksohn, Terry Jeeves, Arnie Katz, Tim Kirk, Damon Knight, Frank Lunney, Sandra Miesel, Ron Miller, Andrew J. Offutt, Andrew I. Porter, Bill Rotsler, Robert Silverberg, Darrell Schweitzer, Mae Strelkov, Bob Tucker, Harry Warner, Jr., Ted White, Susan Wood and Roger Zelazny.Suzanne Tompkins went on to publish the fanzine The Spanish Inquisition with Jerry Kaufman in the 1970s.Bushyager also published the fanzine Kardass in the 1970s.

Hugo Award for Best Fanzine

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Fanzine is given each year for non professionally edited magazines, or "fanzines", related to science fiction or fantasy which has published four or more issues with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year. Awards were also once given out for professional magazines in the professional magazine category, and since 1984 have been awarded for semi-professional magazines in the semiprozine category; several magazines that were nominated for or won the fanzine category have gone on to be nominated for or win the semiprozine category since it was established.

The award was first presented in 1955, and has been given annually since except for in 1958. A "fanzine" is defined for the award as a magazine that does not meet the Hugo award's criteria for a professional or semi-professional magazine. Specifically, it must meet less than two of the five Hugo criteria for consideration as a semiprozine: that the magazine had an average press run of at least one thousand copies per issue, paid its contributors and/or staff in other than copies of the publication, provided at least half the income of any one person, had at least fifteen percent of its total space occupied by advertising, and announced itself to be a semiprozine. This is the oldest long-running Hugo award for fan activity; in 1967 Hugo Awards were added specifically for fan writing and fan art. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1939, 1941, 1946, 1951, and 1954, and the fanzine category has been included each year.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The works on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. The 1955 and 1956 awards did not include any recognition of runner-up magazines, but since 1957 all of the candidates were recorded. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year.During the 69 nomination years, including Retro Hugo years, 128 magazines run by 177 editors have been nominated. Of these, 40 magazines run by 67 editors have won, including ties. Locus has won 8 times out of 13 nominations, the most wins of any magazine. File 770 has won 7 of 31, the most nominations of any magazine. Mimosa has won 6 of 14 nominations, Ansible has won 5 out of 11, and Science Fiction Review has won 4 of 12; they are the only other magazines to win more than twice. Challenger has the most nominations without winning at 12; the next highest is FOSFAX with 7. As editor of Locus Charles N. Brown has won 8 of 13 nominations, though he shared 8 of those awards with Dena Brown. Richard E. Geis has won 6 of 15 nominations for his work on Science Fiction Review, Psychotic, and The Alien Critic; Mike Glyer has won 7 of 31 for editing File 770; David Langford has won 5 of 12 for work on Ansible and Twil-Ddu; and Richard Lynch and Nicki Lynch have both won 6 of 14 nominations for Mimosa. Guy H. Lillian III has the most nominations without winning at 12 for Challenger.

Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine is given each year for semi-professionally-edited magazines related to science fiction or fantasy which had published four or more issues, with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year. Awards were once also given out for professional magazines in the professional magazine category, and are still awarded for fan magazines in the fanzine category.

The award was first presented in 1984, and has been given annually since. A "semiprozine" is defined for the award as a magazine in the field that is not professional but that (unlike a fanzine) either pays its contributors in something other than copies, or is (generally) available only for payment. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954, but the category failed to receive enough to form a ballot each time.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The works on the ballot are the most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. The 1953 through 1956 and 1958 awards did not include any recognition of runner-up magazines, but since 1959 all six candidates were recorded. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year. At the 2008 business meeting, an amendment to the World Science Fiction Society's Constitution was passed which would remove this category. The vote to ratify this amendment was held the following year; the ratification failed and the category remained. Instead, a committee was formed to recommend improvements to the category and related categories.During the 35 nomination years, 36 magazines run by 105 editors have been nominated. Of these, only 8 magazines run by 23 editors have won. Locus won 22 times and was nominated every year until a rules change in 2012 made it ineligible for the category. Uncanny Magazine has won 3 times in a row, 2016–2018, while Science Fiction Chronicle, Clarkesworld Magazine, and Lightspeed are the only other magazines to win more than once, with 2 awards out of 18 nominations, 3 out of 4, and 2 out of 5, respectively, while Ansible has won 1 out of 7 nominations, Interzone has won 1 out of 28, and Weird Tales has won 1 out of its 3 nominations. As editor of Locus Charles N. Brown won 21 of 27 nominations, though he shared 5 of those awards with Kirsten Gong-Wong, 3 with Liza Groen Trombi and 2 with Jennifer A. Hall. Uncanny's awards were earned by a team of 5 people, Lynne M. Thomas, Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, Erika Ensign, and Steven Schapansky. The sole editor for Chronicle's awards was Andrew I. Porter, while David Pringle earned Interzone's, and Ann VanderMeer and Stephen H. Segal were the editors for Weird Tales's victory. Lightspeed's wins were under John Joseph Adams, Rich Horton, and Stefan Rudnicki, with Wendy N. Wagner and Christie Yant added for the second win, while David Langford was the editor when Ansible was awarded. Clarkesworld Magazine's winning years were under Neil Clarke, Sean Wallace, and Kate Baker, with 2 of the three also under Cheryl Morgan and the other under Jason Heller. The New York Review of Science Fiction has received the most number of nominations without ever winning at 22, under the helm of David G. Hartwell, Kathryn Cramer, Kevin J. Maroney, and 8 other editors. The next highest number of nominations without winning is 7 for Speculations under Kent Brewster, Denise Lee, and Susan Fry.

John Bangsund

John Bangsund (born 1939) was a prominent Australian science fiction fan in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. He was a major force, with Andrew I. Porter behind Australia winning the right to host the 1975 Aussiecon, and he was Toastmaster at the Hugo Award ceremony at that convention.

He was an influential and founding member of ANZAPA - the Australian and New Zealand Amateur Press Association; and long-time editor of the newsletter for The Victorian Society of Editors in Australia (of which he is an honorary life member ). His fanzine, Australian Science Fiction Review (ASFR), did much to help revive sf fandom in Australia during the 1960s.He was co-chair of the 9th Australian S.F. Convention (1970), and Fan Guest of Honor at Ozcon (1974 Australian National SF Convention).John Bangsund was the instigator of the term Muphry's law, which states that "if you write anything criticizing editing or proofreading, there will be a fault of some kind in what you have written".

List of Worldcons

This World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) list includes prior and scheduled Worldcons. The data is maintained by the Long List Committee, a World Science Fiction Society sub-committee.

Notes:

Name – a convention is normally listed by the least confusing version of its name. This is usually the name preferred by the convention, but fannish tradition is followed in retroactively numbering the first Worldcon in a series 1 (or I or One).

Guests of honor – custom in designating guests of honor has varied greatly, with some conventions giving specific titles (Fan, Pro, Australia, U.S., Artist, etc.) and some simply call them all guests of honor. Specific labels have been used where they existed, as have regional variants in spelling.

Size – where available, this column records two numbers: how many paying members attended the Worldcon and how many total members there were (in parentheses). The available data is very incomplete and imprecise and many of these numbers are probably substantially in error.1942–1945: Worldcon not held due to World War II

List of awards and nominations received by William Gibson

William Gibson is an American-Canadian writer who has been called the "noir prophet" of the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction. Since first being published in the late 1970s, Gibson has written more than twenty short stories and nine critically acclaimed novels. His early works are bleak, noir near-future stories about the relationship between humans and technology – a "combination of lowlife and high tech". Several of these garnered critical attention and popular acclaim, receiving Hugo and Nebula Awards nominations in the categories of best short story and best novelette and being featured prominently in the annual Locus Awards reader's poll.

The themes, settings and characters developed in these stories culminated in his first novel, Neuromancer (1984), which proved to be the author's breakout work, achieving critical and commercial success and virtually initiating the cyberpunk literary genre. It became the first novel to win the "triple crown" of science fiction awards – the Nebula and the Hugo Awards for best novel along with the Philip K. Dick Award for paperback original, an unprecedented achievement described by the Mail & Guardian as "the sci-fi writer's version of winning the Goncourt, Booker and Pulitzer prizes in the same year". It also won the Ditmar and Seiun awards, received nominations for the year's "outstanding work" Prix Aurora Award and the British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) award for best novel, topped the annual Science Fiction Chronicle poll and finishing third in the standings for the 1985 John W. Campbell Award.

Much of Gibson's reputation remained associated with Neuromancer, and though its sequels in the Sprawl trilogy – Count Zero (1986) and Mona Lisa Overdrive (1988) – also attracted Hugo and Nebula nominations for best novel, major award wins eluded the writer thereafter. "The Winter Market", a short story first published in November 1985, was well-received, garnering Hugo, Nebula, Aurora, and BSFA nominations and finished highly in the Locus, Interzone and Science Fiction Chronicle polls. Having completed the cyberpunk Sprawl trilogy, Gibson became a central figure in the steampunk subgenre by co-authoring the 1990 alternate history novel The Difference Engine, which was nominated for the Nebula, Campbell, Aurora and BSFA awards and featured in the Locus poll. His most recent novels – Pattern Recognition (2003) and Spook Country (2007) – put his work onto mainstream bestseller lists for the first time, and the former was the first of Gibson's novels to be shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award. Gibson was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2008.

Milford Academy

Milford Academy is a post-secondary school founded in 1916 as Yale Preparatory School. It has been located in New Berlin, New York since 2004. Although founded as a preparatory school, its current focus is as a school for athletes who have the potential to play sports at the collegiate level, but are not yet academically ready.

Norwescon

Norwescon is one of the largest regional science fiction and fantasy conventions in the United States. Located in SeaTac in Washington state, Norwescon has been running continuously since 1978.

"Norwescon" was also the name of the 8th World Science Fiction Convention, held in Portland, Oregon, in 1950.

The Falling Astronauts

The Falling Astronauts is a science fiction novel by American writer Barry N. Malzberg, first published in 1971 in a paperback edition by Ace Books.

The Lathe of Heaven

The Lathe of Heaven is a 1971 science fiction novel by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin. The plot revolves around a character whose dreams alter past and present reality. The story was first serialized in the American science fiction magazine Amazing Stories. The novel received nominations for the 1972 Hugo and the 1971 Nebula Award, and won the Locus Award for Best Novel in 1972. Two television film adaptations have been released: the PBS production, The Lathe of Heaven (1980), and Lathe of Heaven (2002), a remake produced by the A&E Network.

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