Andrew Bogut

Andrew Michael Bogut (born 28 November 1984) is an Australian professional basketball player for the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The 7-foot (2.13 m) center began his career in the National Basketball Association (NBA) after he was selected by the Milwaukee Bucks with the first overall pick in the 2005 NBA draft. He earned All-NBA Third Team honors with the Bucks in 2010. He was traded to the Golden State Warriors in 2012, and was named NBA All-Defensive Second Team in 2015, when he won an NBA championship with the Warriors.

Bogut played college basketball for two years with the Utah Utes, and earned national player of the year honors in 2005. He declared for the NBA draft, and became the first Australian to be the NBA's first overall pick. In his first year with the Bucks, Bogut was named to the NBA All-Rookie First Team in 2006. He earned all-league honors in 2010 after averaging a career-high 15.9 points along with 10.2 rebounds per game. He missed most of 2011–12 with an ankle injury, when he was traded to Golden State. After winning the NBA Finals in 2015, Bogut helped the Warriors win an NBA-record 73 games in 2015–16. He was traded to the Dallas Mavericks, where he played briefly before other short stints with the Cleveland Cavaliers and Los Angeles Lakers. In 2018, he returned to his home country to play for the Sydney Kings. After the end of the 2018–19 NBL season, Bogut signed back with the Warriors.

Andrew Bogut
Andrew Bogut 2013-03-06
Bogut with the Golden State Warriors in March 2013
No. 12 – Golden State Warriors
PositionCenter
LeagueNBA
Personal information
Born28 November 1984 (age 34)
Melbourne, Victoria
NationalityAustralian
Listed height7 ft 0 in (2.13 m)
Listed weight260 lb (118 kg)
Career information
High schoolSt John's Regional College
(Melbourne, Victoria)
Lake Ginninderra
(Canberra, Australian Capital Territory)
CollegeUtah (2003–2005)
NBA draft2005 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1st overall
Selected by the Milwaukee Bucks
Playing career2005–present
Career history
20052012Milwaukee Bucks
20122016Golden State Warriors
2016–2017Dallas Mavericks
2017Cleveland Cavaliers
2017–2018Los Angeles Lakers
2018–2019Sydney Kings
2019–presentGolden State Warriors
Career highlights and awards
Stats at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Early life

Bogut was born in Melbourne in 1984. His parents, Michael and Anne, had immigrated to Australia from Croatia in the 1970s.[1] Bogut grew up playing Australian rules football and tennis in addition to basketball. As a child, he patterned his basketball game after Toni Kukoč, a Croatian NBA player who spent the majority of the 1990s playing for the Chicago Bulls.[2] As a 15-year-old, he was cut from the Victoria junior state representative team. In response to this setback, Bogut began to improve his game with the help of Siniša Marković,[3] a professional basketball player from Yugoslavia.[4] Bogut's emergence began after he earned a roster spot with the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) in 2002.[5] He competed in the South East Australian Basketball League (SEABL) in 2002 and 2003, helping the AIS win the East Conference title in his first season. He later joined the U-19 Australian junior national team, and was named the most valuable player of the 2003 FIBA Under-19 World Cup, in Greece, after leading the Emus to the title. In eight games, he averaged 26.3 points, 17 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.5 blocks per game, and he shot 61 percent from the field and 74 percent from the free throw line. One of the highlights of his MVP conquest was a 22-point, 18-rebound performance, in a 106–85 win over the US, in the quarter-finals of the medal round.[6]

College career

As a freshman at Utah in 2003–04, Bogut averaged 12.5 points and 9.9 rebounds in 33 games. He subsequently earned CollegeInsider.com All-Freshman Team honours, Mountain West Conference Freshman of the Year, second-team All-Mountain West Conference, and NABC second-team All-District 13.[7]

As a sophomore in 2004–05, Bogut started all 35 games for the Utes, leading them to a 29–6 record, the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament, and a Mountain West Conference championship. He led the nation with 26 double-doubles and scored in double figures in 37 consecutive games dating back to the final two games of the 2003–04 season to have the sixth-longest streak in the country. He ranked 19th in the NCAA in scoring (20.4 ppg), second in rebounding (12.2 rpg) and eighth in field goal percentage (62.0), and led the Mountain West Conference in scoring, rebounding and field goal percentage. He became one of 31 Utah players all-time to score 1,000 points in his career, but just the third to reach that mark in two seasons.[7] He was named the 2004–05 national player of the year by ESPN.com and Basketball Times, and earned Associated Press first-team All-American and leading vote getter, becoming the 11th Ute all-time to earn All-America honours. He also earned Naismith College Player of the Year honours and the John R. Wooden Award.[8] He later had his No. 4 jersey retired by Utah.

Professional career

Milwaukee Bucks (2005–2012)

AndrewBogutrebound
Bogut with the Bucks in 2005

Bogut was selected by the Milwaukee Bucks with the first overall pick in the 2005 NBA draft, becoming the first Australian player and the second Utah player (the first being Bill McGill) to be drafted number one overall. As a rookie in 2005–06, he earned All-Rookie First Team honours and finished third in votes for the NBA Rookie of the Year Award. He played in all 82 regular season games for the Bucks in his first season, averaging 9.4 points and 7.0 rebounds per game.

Bogut's second season in the league was cut short after spraining his left foot and being put on the injured reserve for the final 15 games. He had previously played in 153 consecutive games.[9] He improved his numbers in 2006–07 to 12.3 points and 8.8 rebounds per game.

In the 2007–08 NBA season, Bogut set career-highs in points (14.3), rebounds (9.8), blocks (1.7), steals (0.8) and minutes (34.9) per game.[10] He tallied a career-high 29 points against the Phoenix Suns in December and finished 9th in the NBA in blocks, 11th in rebounding and 12th in double-doubles (38). He started in 78 games for the Bucks, missing just four games through injury.[11]

Bogut appeared in just 36 games for the Bucks in 2008–09, missing the final 31 games of the season with a stress fracture in his lower back.[12] He faced more time on the sidelines during the 2009–10 season due to a strained ligament and bruise in his left leg.[12] On April 3, 2010, near the end of a breakout season, Bogut suffered a major injury. That night, in a game against the Phoenix Suns at the Bradley Center, Bogut had a chance to score on a fast break attempt. As he went up, Amar'e Stoudemire appeared to make some contact with Bogut and he lost his balance while completing the dunk. He hung onto the rim for a brief moment to try to right himself but could not, and fell at an awkward angle. Placing his right arm out to break the fall, Bogut landed with all of his weight on top of his wrist and his arm twisted as he landed.[13] The next day, Bogut was diagnosed with a broken hand, dislocated elbow and sprained wrist, injuries that kept him out of for the remainder of the 2009–10 season.[14] In what was a breakout season for Bogut, he finished with averages of 15.9 points, 10.2 rebounds and 2.5 blocks per game, earning All-NBA Third Team honours, becoming first Bucks player named to the squad since Michael Redd in 2003–04.[15] Bogut helped the Bucks to a 46–36 record, their most wins since going 50–32 in 2000–01, and their first playoff appearance since 2006.[15]

Bogut returned to the Bucks' line-up in 2010–11, playing in 65 games and leading the league in blocks with 2.6 per game.[16]

Andrew Bogut pass
Bogut with the Bucks in 2011

During the 2011 NBA lockout, Bogut chose to return home to Australia and play in the NBL for the 2011–12 season. He was linked to the Gold Coast Blaze, Adelaide 36ers and the team he supported when growing up, the Sydney Kings. Ultimately, he chose the Kings (who finished last in 2010–11), but the insurance to cover his remaining $39m contract with the Bucks could not be resolved, leaving the Kings and the NBL without his on-court services.[17] Following the breakdown in contract negotiations over the insurance money, Bogut stated he would like to join the Kings coaching staff in a bid not only to help the club, but help raise the NBL's profile. This, however, did not occur and he later returned to the Bucks following the conclusion of the lockout. On 25 January 2012, he fractured his ankle, ruling him out for the rest of the season.[18]

Golden State Warriors (2012–2016)

On 13 March 2012, Bogut and Stephen Jackson were traded to the Golden State Warriors in exchange for Monta Ellis, Ekpe Udoh and Kwame Brown.[19] According to the Warriors, he underwent surgery in April to "clean out loose particles and bone spurs in the ankle".[18] He sat out the 2012–13 preseason, but played in four of the first five regular season games, averaging just 6.0 points and 3.8 rebounds. He was then declared out indefinitely. He received Regenokine treatment to aid his recovery in late November,[20] and it was also revealed that his procedure in April was more serious microfracture surgery than previously thought.[18] Bogut returned on 28 January 2013, recording 12 points, 8 rebounds, 2 assists and 4 blocks in a road win over the Toronto Raptors. On 2 May 2013, in Game 6 of the first round of the playoffs, Bogut recorded playoff career-highs of 14 points and 21 rebounds. He also became the first Warriors player with 20 playoff rebounds since Larry Smith had 23 on 12 May 1987 against the Los Angeles Lakers.

On 25 October 2013, Bogut signed a three-year contract extension with the Warriors.[21] Despite another injury-riddled season in 2013–14, Bogut still finished 10th in NBA Defensive Player of the Year voting and became the first player in franchise history to average at least 10 rebounds per game while shooting 60 percent from the field.[22]

After playing well through the first 19 games of the 2014–15 season, Bogut injured his right knee on 8 December 2014 against the Minnesota Timberwolves and subsequently missed 12 games. He returned to action off the bench against Indiana on 7 January 2015, recording 4 points and 8 rebounds in a 117–102 win.[23] On 2 March 2015, he scored a season-high 16 points in a loss to the Brooklyn Nets.[24] On 7 April 2015, he recorded 8 points and a career-high 9 blocks in a loss to the New Orleans Pelicans.[25] Bogut and the Warriors won the 2015 NBA Finals after defeating the Cleveland Cavaliers in six games.

Disappointed in the way he ended the 2014–15 season, Bogut removed all processed sugars from his diet during the 2015 off-season and subsequently came into training camp in October 2015 with improved athleticism, having dropped 10 kilograms.[26] On 9 February 2016, Bogut had a season-best game with 13 points, 11 rebounds, three steals and a season-high six blocked shots in a 123–110 win over the Houston Rockets.[27] The Warriors broke the NBA record for most wins in a season with 73, eclipsing the 72 wins set by the 1995–96 Chicago Bulls. In Game 5 of the Warriors' Conference Finals match-up with the Oklahoma City Thunder, Bogut recorded a playoff career-high 15 points and 14 rebounds to help the Warriors send the series to a Game 6 with a 120–111 win at home, cutting the Thunder's advantage in the series to 3–2.[28] The Warriors went on to win the series in seven games and advanced to the NBA Finals for the second straight year. The Warriors would again face the Cleveland Cavaliers. On 15 June 2016, he was ruled out for six to eight weeks with a left knee injury. The injury occurred during Game 5 of the NBA Finals.[29] The Warriors went on to lose the series in seven games.

Dallas Mavericks (2016–2017)

On 7 July 2016, Bogut was traded, along with a future second-round pick, to the Dallas Mavericks in exchange for a future conditional second-round pick.[30] The trade was made by the Warriors to free up salary cap space for their signing of Kevin Durant. Bogut made his debut for the Mavericks in their season opener on 26 October 2016, recording six points, six rebounds, three assists and one block in a 130–121 overtime loss to the Indiana Pacers.[31] On 3 December, he had a game-high 11 rebounds and a season-high eight points in a 107–82 win over the Chicago Bulls.[32] He went on to miss 11 games in December with a right knee injury,[33] and a further six games in January with a right hamstring strain.[34]

On 23 February 2017, Bogut was traded, along with Justin Anderson and a protected first-round pick, to the Philadelphia 76ers in exchange for Nerlens Noel.[35] Four days later, he was waived by the 76ers.[36][37]

Cleveland Cavaliers (2017)

On 2 March 2017, Bogut signed with the Cleveland Cavaliers.[38] Four days later, Bogut broke his left leg 56 seconds into his Cleveland debut. Initial X-rays revealed a fractured tibia; he was subsequently taken to the Cleveland Clinic for further tests.[39] There his tibia was set, and was scheduled to undergo a non-surgical treatment and recovery plan. He was subsequently ruled out for the remainder of the regular season and playoffs.[40] As a result, on 13 March 2017, he was waived by the Cavaliers.[41]

Los Angeles Lakers (2017–2018)

On 19 September 2017, Bogut signed with the Los Angeles Lakers.[42] He made his debut for the Lakers in their season opener on 19 October 2017, committing three fouls and three turnovers in a 108–92 loss to the Los Angeles Clippers.[43] On 6 January 2018, Bogut was waived by the Lakers.[44] In March, he announced that he would not return to the NBA during the 2017–18 season in order to remain in Australia with his pregnant wife.[45]

Sydney Kings (2018–2019)

On 24 April 2018, Bogut signed a two-year deal with the Sydney Kings.[46] At the conclusion of the 2018–19 regular season, Bogut was named the NBL Most Valuable Player after averaging 11.6 points per game to go with 329 rebounds, 98 assists and 77 blocked shots.[47][48] He was also named the Best Defensive Player and earned All-NBL First Team honours.[47] He helped the Kings reach the playoffs with an 18–10 record and a third-place finish, before losing 2–0 to Melbourne United in the semi-finals.[49] In 30 total games, he averaged 11.4 points, a league-high 11.6 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 2.7 blocks in 29.7 minutes per game.[50]

Return to Golden State (2019–present)

On 6 March 2019, after the conclusion of the 2018–19 NBL season, Bogut signed with the Golden State Warriors for the remainder of the 2018–19 NBA season.[50] The Warriors went on to reach the 2019 NBA Finals, where they lost in six games to the Toronto Raptors.

National team career

Bogut started for the Boomers at the 2004 Athens Olympics, averaging 13.7 points, 9 rebounds and 1.2 blocked shots and shooting 58.0% from the field. He represented Australia again in the 2006 FIBA World Championship. Australia advanced to the Round of 16 before losing to the United States. He averaged 12.8 points per game and 6.2 rebounds per game during the tournament, leading Australia in both categories. He started for the Boomers at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. In 2012, he was unable to play for the Boomers in the London Olympics, as he had previously broken his left ankle in January during the 2011–12 NBA season.[51]

On 14 July 2015, Bogut was named in the Australian Boomers squad for their European tour and the 2015 FIBA Oceania Championship.[52] The following year, he was a member of the Boomers team that finished in fourth place at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. This equalled Australia's best ever finish at the Olympics, with the Boomers having also finished fourth in 1988, 1996 and 2000.

Career statistics

NBA statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high
Denotes season in which Bogut won an NBA championship
* Led the league

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2005–06 Milwaukee 82 77 28.6 .533 .000 .629 7.0 2.3 .6 .8 9.4
2006–07 Milwaukee 66 66 34.2 .553 .200 .577 8.8 3.0 .7 .5 12.3
2007–08 Milwaukee 78 78 34.9 .511 .000 .587 9.8 2.6 .8 1.7 14.3
2008–09 Milwaukee 36 33 31.2 .577 - .571 10.3 2.0 .6 1.0 11.7
2009–10 Milwaukee 69 69 32.3 .520 .000 .629 10.2 1.8 .6 2.5 15.9
2010–11 Milwaukee 65 65 35.3 .495 .000 .442 11.1 2.0 .7 2.6* 12.8
2011–12 Milwaukee 12 12 30.3 .449 .000 .609 8.3 2.6 1.0 2.0 11.3
2012–13 Golden State 32 32 24.6 .451 1.000 .500 7.7 2.1 .6 1.7 5.8
2013–14 Golden State 67 67 26.4 .627 - .344 10.0 1.7 .7 1.8 7.3
2014–15 Golden State 67 65 23.6 .563 - .524 8.1 2.7 .6 1.7 6.3
2015–16 Golden State 70 66 20.7 .627 1.000 .480 7.0 2.3 .5 1.6 5.4
2016–17 Dallas 26 21 22.4 .469 .000 .273 8.3 1.9 .5 1.0 3.0
2016–17 Cleveland 1 0 1.0 - - - .0 .0 .0 .0 .0
2017–18 L.A. Lakers 24 5 9.0 .680 - 1.000 3.3 .6 .2 .5 1.5
2018–19 Golden State 11 5 12.2 .500 - 1.000 5.0 1.0 .3 .7 3.5
Career 706 661 28.1 .535 .120 .557 8.7 2.2 .6 1.5 9.6

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2006 Milwaukee 5 5 34.4 .435 .000 .375 6.2 3.4 .6 .0 8.6
2013 Golden State 12 12 27.3 .582 .000 .348 10.9 1.8 .5 1.5 7.2
2015 Golden State 19 18 23.2 .560 .000 .385 8.1 1.9 .6 1.8 4.7
2016 Golden State 22 22 16.6 .623 .000 .357 5.7 1.4 .6 1.6 4.6
2019 Golden State 19 6 9.4 .649 .000 .800 3.9 1.1 .3 .3 2.7
Career 77 63 19.3 .573 .000 .397 6.7 1.6 .5 1.2 4.8

College statistics

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2003–04 Utah 33 33 30.4 .577 .364 .640 9.9 2.2 .4 1.3 12.5
2004–05 Utah 35 35 35.0 .620 .360 .692 12.2 2.3 1.0 1.9 20.4
Career 68 68 32.7 .603 .361 .674 11.1 2.3 .7 1.6 16.6

National team statistics

Tournament Points per game Rebounds per game Assists per game
2003 U19 World Cup 26.2 17 2.5
2004 FIBA Diamond Ball 10.7 3 2
2004 Olympic Games 13.7 9 1.3
2006 Stankovic Cup 16.3 8.7 2.7
2006 FIBA World Cup 12.8 6.2 2.3
2008 FIBA Diamond Ball 15 7 1.3
2008 Olympic Games 12.7 3.8 1.2
2015 FIBA Oceania 7 7 0.5
2016 Olympic Games 9.1 5.1 3.6

Source: FIBA.com

References

  1. ^ Brown, Daniel (22 March 2012). "Andrew Bogut: Seven things about the Warriors' new 7-footer". MercuryNews.com. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  2. ^ Reed, Truman (13 April 2007). "Bucks Back When ... Andrew Bogut, Part I". NBA.com. Archived from the original on 10 May 2007. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  3. ^ Coleman, Mike (18 July 2008). "Andrew Bogut a down-to-earth NBA superstar". HeraldSun.com.au. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  4. ^ Fang, Gavin (17 June 2005). "Melbourne's Andrew Bogut top pick in American NBL draft". ABC.net.au. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  5. ^ "Past Athletes". ausport.gov.au. Archived from the original on 12 February 2014.
  6. ^ Reed, Truman (16 April 2007). "Bucks Back When ... Andrew Bogut, Part II". NBA.com. Archived from the original on 24 July 2008. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  7. ^ a b "Andrew Bogut Bio". UtahUtes.com. Archived from the original on 22 March 2016. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  8. ^ "Andrew Bogut". woodenaward.com. Archived from the original on 21 August 2015.
  9. ^ Dampney, James (22 March 2007). "Bogut out for the season". FoxSports.com. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  10. ^ "Andrew Bogut NBA Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  11. ^ "BOGUT SOARS IN 2007/08 NBA FULL SEASON RECAP". Basketball.net.au. 18 April 2008. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  12. ^ a b "Bogut concerned about injury run". ABC.net.au. 21 November 2009. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  13. ^ Gardner, Charles F. (4 April 2010). "Bucks 107, Suns 98; Bucks lose Bogut for the season". jsonline.com. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  14. ^ "Bucks' Bogut out indefinitely". ESPN.com. 4 April 2010. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  15. ^ a b "Bogut named to All-NBA Third Team". NBA.com. 6 May 2010. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  16. ^ "ANDREW BOGUT – A JOURNEY TO AN NBA CHAMPIONSHIP RING". Basketball.net.au. 17 June 2015. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  17. ^ Stein, Marc (6 October 2011). "Andrew Bogut won't play in Australia". ESPN.com. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  18. ^ a b c "Andrew Bogut out indefinitely". ESPN.com. 29 November 2012. Archived from the original on 29 November 2012.
  19. ^ "Warriors Acquire Andrew Bogut and Stephen Jackson From Milwaukee". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. 13 March 2012. Retrieved 14 March 2012.
  20. ^ Amick, Sam (15 November 2012). "Bogut is getting blood manipulation treatments". hoopsworld.com. Archived from the original on 22 November 2012.
  21. ^ "Warriors sign Andrew Bogut to contract extension". Archived from the original on 17 April 2015. Retrieved 26 October 2013.
  22. ^ "2013–14 Season Review: Andrew Bogut". Archived from the original on 18 February 2015. Retrieved 8 January 2015.
  23. ^ Thompson scores 40, Warriors beat Pacers 117-102
  24. ^ Jack's jumper gives Nets 110-108 win over Curry, Warriors
  25. ^ Pelicans beat Warriors 103-100, move into 8th spot
  26. ^ Australian NBA star Andrew Bogut drops 10kg in off-season after cutting sugar from his diet
  27. ^ Curry leads Warriors past Rockets for 42nd straight home win
  28. ^ Defending champion Warriors stave off elimination, beat OKC
  29. ^ Andrew Bogut Update 6.15.16
  30. ^ "Mavericks acquire center Andrew Bogut from Warriors". mavs.com. 7 July 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  31. ^ "Turner's opening act leads Pacers past Mavs, 130-121 in OT". NBA.com. 26 October 2016. Retrieved 26 October 2016.
  32. ^ "Barnes, Matthews power Mavericks past Bulls 107-82". ESPN.com. 3 December 2016. Retrieved 4 December 2016.
  33. ^ "Harden, Rockets top Mavs 123-107 in technical-marred game". ESPN.com. 27 December 2016. Retrieved 27 December 2016.
  34. ^ "Barnes scores 23 to lead Mavericks over Knicks, 103-95". ESPN.com. 25 January 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017.
  35. ^ "Philadelphia 76ers Acquire First-Round Pick, Justin Anderson, and Andrew Bogut From Dallas". NBA.com. 23 February 2017. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  36. ^ Vardon, Joe (27 February 2017). "Andrew Bogut waived by 76ers, Cavs hopeful to sign him". Cleveland.com. Retrieved 27 February 2017.
  37. ^ Stein, Marc (27 February 2017). "76ers waive Andrew Bogut, Lakers waive Jose Calderon to complete buyouts". ESPN.com. Retrieved 27 February 2017.
  38. ^ "OFFICIAL: Cavs Sign Andrew Bogut". NBA.com. 2 March 2017. Retrieved 2 March 2017.
  39. ^ "Bogut breaks leg in debut, Cavs lose 106-98 to Heat". ESPN.com. 6 March 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2017.
  40. ^ "Status Update on Bogut, Korver, Smith and Coach Lue". NBA.com. 8 March 2017. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  41. ^ Withers, Tom (13 March 2017). "Cleveland Cavaliers sign forward Larry Sanders, waive Andrew Bogut". NBA.com. Retrieved 13 March 2017.
  42. ^ "Lakers Sign Andrew Bogut". NBA.com. 19 September 2017. Retrieved 19 September 2017.
  43. ^ "Deflated Ball: Blake gets 29 in Clips' 108-92 rout of Lakers". ESPN.com. 19 October 2017. Retrieved 20 October 2017.
  44. ^ "Lakers Waive Andrew Bogut". NBA.com. 6 January 2018. Retrieved 6 January 2018.
  45. ^ "Andrew Bogut remains in Australia with pregnant wife, won't seek late-season NBA contract". NBA.com. 27 March 2018. Retrieved 27 March 2018.
  46. ^ "Australian Legend Andrew Bogut Signs with Sydney Kings". NBL.com.au. 24 April 2018. Retrieved 24 April 2018.
  47. ^ a b "NBL Awards: Bogut wins Andrew Gaze Trophy as MVP". NBL.com.au. 17 February 2019. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  48. ^ O'Donoghue, Craig (18 February 2019). "Gracious Sydney Kings star Andrew Bogut says Perth Wildcat Bryce Cotton should've won NBL MVP award". TheWest.com.au. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  49. ^ "Casper and CG43's 53 lift Melbourne into Grand Final". NBL.com.au. 3 March 2019. Retrieved 5 March 2019.
  50. ^ a b "Warriors Sign Center Andrew Bogut". NBA.com. 6 March 2019. Retrieved 6 March 2019.
  51. ^ "Bogut's Olympics future hinges on ankle scans". ABC.net.au. 16 March 2012. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  52. ^ AUSTRALIAN BOOMERS' TEAM NAMED FOR 2015 INTERNATIONALS

External links

2003 FIBA Under-19 World Championship

The 2003 FIBA Under-19 World Championship was the seventh men's under-19 only, international basketball competition organized by FIBA. It was held in the Greek city of Thessaloniki from July 10 to July 20, 2003. Australia won the tournament beating Lithuania 126-92 in the final. Andrew Bogut was named the tournament MVP.

2004–05 NCAA Division I men's basketball season

The 2004–05 NCAA Division I men's basketball season began on November 10, 2004, progressed through the regular season and conference tournaments, and concluded with the 2005 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament Championship Game on April 4, 2005 at the Edward Jones Dome in Saint Louis, Missouri. The North Carolina Tar Heels won their fourth NCAA national championship with a 75–70 victory over the Illinois Fighting Illini.

2004–05 Utah Utes men's basketball team

The 2004–05 Utah Utes men's basketball team represented the University of Utah in the 2004–05 season. Led by first year head coach Ray Giacoletti, due to longtime head coach Rick Majerus' resignation one year prior, the Utes made the Sweet Sixteen in the NCAA tournament. After the season, Sophomore forward Andrew Bogut was selected first overall in the NBA draft, by the Milwaukee Bucks, eventually playing with the Golden State Warriors (with whom he would win the NBA championship in 2015), the Dallas Mavericks, the Cleveland Cavaliers, and the Los Angeles Lakers. Bogut (who was born in Australia) also became the first foreign-born player to be drafted first overall from an American college.

2005 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The Consensus 2005 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The Sporting News and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

2007–08 Milwaukee Bucks season

The 2007–08 Milwaukee Bucks season was the 40th season of NBA basketball in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It began in October. The Bucks finished with just 26 wins in the weak Eastern Conference and as a result Larry Krystkowiak was fired after just one season as coach, one day after the season officially ended. Scott Skiles was then appointed coach soon after to a four-year contract.Key dates prior to the start of the season:

The 2007 NBA draft took place in New York City on June 28.

The free agency period begins in July.

2008–09 Milwaukee Bucks season

The 2008–09 Milwaukee Bucks season is the 41st season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

2009–10 Milwaukee Bucks season

The 2009–10 Milwaukee Bucks season was the 42nd season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA).The Bucks made the playoffs for the first time in four seasons, though they would lose in the First Round in seven games. It was during this season in which the slogan "Fear the Deer" was coined, which the fans adopted onto the Internet. Five years after it was introduced, the Bucks used the slogan as part of their new jersey design and on the sidelines of the court.The 46-win total was the most games the Bucks had won since 2001 and the most they would win until 2019.

2010–11 Milwaukee Bucks season

The 2010–11 Milwaukee Bucks season is the 43rd season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

2012–13 Golden State Warriors season

The 2012–13 Golden State Warriors season was the 67th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the 51st anniversary of their time in the San Francisco Bay Area.

The team finished with a record of 47-35 (.573), and finished the season as the number-six seed, clinching a playoff berth for the first time since 2007. The team had a winning record for the first time since 2008. This season included the first playoff series victory for the first time since 2007, as most of the squad experienced postseason play for the first time.

The Warriors had four draft picks in the 2012 NBA Draft, a decisive draft year that was vital for a potential future for the team. The picks included Harrison Barnes with the 7th pick, Festus Ezeli with the 30th pick, Draymond Green with the 35th pick, and Ognjen Kuzmic with the 52nd pick. With Brandon Rush and his season-ending injury, Barnes was placed in the starting lineup and became crucial in bringing the team back to the playoffs for the first time in six years. Another injury mid-season from Andrew Bogut also affected the team with the lack of a true center for a majority of the season.

Notable highlights from the season included Stephen Curry breaking the record for three-point field goals made in a single season with 272, thus eclipsing Ray Allen's then-seven-year-old record of 269 made, and Curry and Klay Thompson's rise to NBA dominance as one of the greatest three-point-shooting duos in history, coining the term "Splash Brothers" for their abilities to shoot beyond the arc in record-breaking numbers. A seven-game Eastern Conference road trip featured a 6-1 record, including a close win against the defending champion Miami Heat. David Lee was named as an All-Star in the 2013 NBA All-Star Game in Houston, and thus became the first Warrior since Latrell Sprewell in 1997 to be named an All-Star. Lee also led the league in double-doubles. The Warriors returned to the playoffs for the first time in six years; for most players the first time experiencing postseason play except Bogut. After a 4-2 series win against the number-three seed Denver Nuggets in the first round, the Warriors won a playoff series for the first time since 2007. In the Conference Semifinal, the Warriors faced the number two-seed San Antonio Spurs. Curry scored 44 points in a double-overtime loss in Game 1, but the team pulled off a 100-91 Game 2 win, which was the first Warriors victory, playoff or regular season, in San Antonio since February 1997, to tie the series at one game apiece. However, despite the willingness to fight, the inexperience and youth of the Warrior squad resulted in defeat as the Warriors lost to the eventual Western Conference Champion Spurs in six games.

2013–14 Golden State Warriors season

The 2013–14 Golden State Warriors season was the 68th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the 52nd anniversary of their time in the San Francisco Bay Area. They finished the regular season with a record of 51–31, clinching the sixth seed in the Western Conference. In the playoffs, the Warriors faced the Los Angeles Clippers in the first round of the playoffs, and lost in seven games.

Following the season, Mark Jackson was dismissed as the Warriors head coach, and Steve Kerr became the new head coach. As of 2019, this was the last time the Warriors did not make the NBA Finals.

2014–15 Golden State Warriors season

The 2014–15 Golden State Warriors season was the 69th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and their 53rd in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Warriors finished the season 67–15, a new franchise record for wins in a season, clinching their best record in the NBA since they won 59 games in the 1975–76 season. They are the tenth NBA team to win 67 games in a season. Golden State reached the 2015 NBA Finals and defeated the Cleveland Cavaliers 4–2, to win their first title in 40 years, and the fourth in franchise history. Their 83 total wins for the season was the third most for a team in NBA history, they went 83–20 combining regular season and playoff games.

Under first-year head coach and former NBA player Steve Kerr, the Warriors began the season 10–2, the best start in franchise history. They went 5–0 on the road in November, their second perfect road trip in franchise history, and first since 1978. Between November 13 and December 14, the Warriors won a franchise record 16 games in a row, improving to 21–2 on the season, before the record was snapped by the Memphis Grizzlies. On January 21, the team established a new franchise record of 17 straight home wins, extending the record to 19 before losing to the Chicago Bulls on January 27. With their win against the Portland Trail Blazers on March 24, they clinched the Pacific Division for the first time since the 1975–76 season, also tying the franchise record for road wins in a season with 24. Golden State finished with a road record of 28–13, and a franchise home win-loss record of 39–2, tied for second all-time best home record. On March 28, the Warriors won their 60th game and clinched the best record in the Western Conference and set a franchise record for regular season wins (the 1975–76 Warriors had won 59). They finished the regular season with a record of 67–15.

Numerous Warriors set individual records over the course of the season. Stephen Curry won the NBA Most Valuable Player Award, the first Warriors player to win since Wilt Chamberlain in the 1959–60 NBA season, when the franchise was still located in Philadelphia. He also broke his own NBA record for made three-pointers in a season of 272, he finished with 286. On January 23, 2015, Klay Thompson broke the NBA record for most points scored in a quarter with 37; he finished the game with a career high 52 points. On April 15, head coach Steve Kerr won his 63rd game with the Warriors and broke the NBA record for most wins by a rookie head coach. Curry and Thompson, dubbed the "Splash Brothers", broke the single-season record for most three-pointers made by a pair of teammates. Both also made the All-Star team, Curry as a starter and Thompson as a reserve. Together, they sank 525 three-pointers over the course of the season, smashing the prior NBA record of 484 (set by themselves in 2013–14).

2016–17 Dallas Mavericks season

The 2016–17 Dallas Mavericks season was the 37th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). For the first time since 2013, the Mavs did not qualify for the playoffs. This was their first time missing the playoffs under the coaching of Rick Carlisle and their first losing season since 2000.

Australia national basketball team

The Australian men's national basketball team, known as the Boomers, represents Australia in international basketball competition. The team is named after the slang term for a male kangaroo. Australia finished fourth at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games.

Australia is a regional power in basketball. Placed in the relatively weak FIBA Oceania region, the Boomers's qualification for the Summer Olympic Games and FIBA World Cup is often a three-match competition against the other regional power, the New Zealand Tall Blacks.

Before the formation of the National Basketball League (NBL) in 1979, Boomers players were selected from state leagues around the country, with Victoria, South Australia, and to a lesser extent New South Wales the dominant states. After the formation of the NBL, players began to be selected almost exclusively from that competition during the 1980s and 1990s.

Occasionally players were selected from outside the NBL. Mark Bradtke made his Boomers debut in 1987 while attending the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) before he entered the NBL. Luc Longley made his debut in 1988 while playing college basketball in the United States. Other Australian players enter the Euroleague and the National Basketball Association (NBA) in the U.S. The Boomers's roster for the 2014 World Cup included five NBA players: Cameron Bairstow with the Brisbane Bullets, Aron Baynes with the Boston Celtics, Matthew Dellavedova with the Milwaukee Bucks, and Dante Exum and Joe Ingles with the Utah Jazz. Three other players were ruled out of the World Cup due to injury play in the NBA, namely Andrew Bogut of the Los Angeles Lakers, rookie Ben Simmons of the Philadelphia 76ers and Patty Mills of the San Antonio Spurs.

Several players on youth national teams are student athletes at the AIS or in the US college basketball system. Some players (e.g. Longley) made the senior national team while at US schools. By the early 21st century, almost half of the squad was playing outside Australia. For the 2012 London Olympic Games, only two members of the Australian squad were based in the country – Peter Crawford and Adam Gibson, with the latter being the only Australia-based member of the 2014 World Cup squad. The AIS has helped Australia's popularity worldwide.

Australia has participated in the most Olympic men's basketball tournaments (14) without winning a medal. Australia has also participated in 11 FIBA World Cups without winning a medal, making Australia the nation with the second-most appearances at the tournament without winning a medal, behind Canada and Puerto Rico (both 13).

List of U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards

This article lists U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards. Several different organizations sponsor an award for the nation's top player.

List of first overall NBA draft picks

The National Basketball Association's first overall pick is the player who is selected first among all eligible draftees by a team during the annual National Basketball Association (NBA) draft. The first pick is awarded to the team that wins the NBA draft lottery; in most cases, that team had a losing record in the previous season. The team with the first pick attracts significant media attention, as does the player who is selected with that pick.

Eleven first picks have won the NBA Most Valuable Player Award: Oscar Robertson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (record six-time winner), Bill Walton, Magic Johnson (three-time winner), Hakeem Olajuwon, David Robinson, Shaquille O'Neal, Allen Iverson, Tim Duncan (two-time winner), LeBron James (four-time winner), and Derrick Rose (youngest winner).

Since the advent of the draft lottery in 1985, seven number one overall picks have won an NBA title. They are David Robinson, Shaquille O'Neal, Glenn Robinson, Tim Duncan, LeBron James, Andrew Bogut, and Kyrie Irving.

China's Yao Ming (2002) and Italy's Andrea Bargnani (2006) are the only two players without competitive experience in the United States to be drafted first overall. Eleven other international players with U.S. college experience have been drafted first overall—Mychal Thompson (Bahamas) in 1978, Hakeem Olajuwon (Nigeria) in 1984, Patrick Ewing (Jamaica) in 1985, Tim Duncan (U.S. Virgin Islands) in 1997, Michael Olowokandi (Nigeria) in 1998, Andrew Bogut (Australia) in 2005, Kyrie Irving (Australia) in 2011, Anthony Bennett (Canada) in 2013, Andrew Wiggins (Canada) in 2014, Ben Simmons (Australia) in 2016, and Deandre Ayton (Bahamas) in 2018. Duncan is an American citizen, but is considered an "international" player by the NBA because he was not born in one of the fifty states or the District of Columbia. Ewing had dual Jamaican-American citizenship when he was drafted and Irving and Simmons had dual Australian-American citizenship when they were drafted.

Note that the drafts between 1947 and 1949 were held by the Basketball Association of America (BAA). The Basketball Association of America became the National Basketball Association after absorbing teams from the National Basketball League in the fall of 1949. Official NBA publications include the BAA Drafts as part of the NBA's draft history.

Milwaukee Bucks accomplishments and records

This page details the all-time statistics, records, and other achievements pertaining to the Milwaukee Bucks.

Mountain West Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Mountain West Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year is a basketball award given to the Mountain West Conference's most outstanding player. The award was first given following the 1999–00 season—the first year of the conference's existence. As of 2015, no player has received the award multiple times. Two winners of the conference award were consensus national Players of the Year—Andrew Bogut of the University of Utah in 2004–05 and Jimmer Fredette of Brigham Young University (BYU) in 2010–11.

BYU has the most winners with five, with New Mexico and Utah in second place with four. In addition to New Mexico, current conference members with a winner also include San Diego State with three and Air Force, Boise State, Colorado State, Fresno State, Nevada and Utah State with one each (BYU and Utah both left for other conferences in 2011). The remaining four all-sports members are yet to have a winner—charter members UNLV and Wyoming, and 2013 arrival San Jose State.

Pete Newell Big Man Award

The Pete Newell Big Man Award has been awarded by the National Association of Basketball Coaches since 2000. It is presented to the top low-post player each season. The award is named after Pete Newell, the coach who ran the Pete Newell Big Man Camp for low-post players from 1976 until his death in 2008.

So far, no player has won the award more than once. Only three schools, Duke, Utah, and Purdue have produced more than one winner; Duke has had three winners, and Utah and Purdue have two each. Utah's winners are the only two to have been born outside the U.S.—Andrew Bogut in Australia and Jakob Pöltl in Austria.

Sydney Kings

The Sydney Kings are an Australian men’s professional basketball team competing in the National Basketball League (NBL). The team is based in Sydney, New South Wales. The Kings were formed from a merger between the West Sydney Westars and the Sydney Supersonics in October 1987. They were the first team to win three consecutive championships in the NBL and currently sit fifth behind the Adelaide 36ers and New Zealand Breakers (four each), Melbourne United (five) and Perth Wildcats (eight) for championships won. The Kings play their home games at the Qudos Bank Arena in Sydney Olympic Park, New South Wales.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.