Andre Reed

Andre Darnell Reed (born January 29, 1964) is a former professional American football player. He played wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) for 16 seasons, 15 with the Buffalo Bills (1985–1999) and one with the Washington Redskins (2000). After being eligible for eight years, Reed was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2014. Reed is currently a Boys & Girls Club of America (BGCA) Ambassador after being inducted to their Hall of Fame in 2015. In addition, he leads up a literacy program for underprivileged youth in the BGCA, called Read with Reed 83 Challenge.

Reed currently ranks eighteenth in NFL history in total career receptions with 951. At the time of his retirement, Reed was second all-time in career receptions.[1] In 2009, Reed was elected to the Buffalo Bills 50th Season All-Time Team.[2]

Andre Reed
refer to caption
Reed signing autographs in March 2009 aboard USS Ronald Reagan
No. 83, 84
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:January 29, 1964 (age 55)
Allentown, Pennsylvania
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:Allentown (PA) Dieruff
College:Kutztown University
NFL Draft:1985 / Round: 4 / Pick: 86
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:951
Receiving yards:13,198
Touchdowns:87
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Football career

Reed was born in Allentown and began his football career at Allentown's Dieruff High School, where he played quarterback and competed in the East Penn Conference, which is known for producing top collegiate and NFL football talent. In his senior year (1981–1982), Reed helped lead Dieruff to an EPC tri-championship, tying for the championship with Emmaus High School and Whitehall High School.

Reed then attended Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, where he moved to the wide receiver position and quickly drew the attention of the NFL for his speed and durability at the receiver position.

In the 1985 NFL Draft, Reed was drafted by the Buffalo Bills in the fourth round with the 86th overall selection. He played for the Bills for 15 consecutive seasons, from 1985 through 1999, during which he played in four Super Bowls for the Bills. He was released in the 2000 offseason, along with fellow longtime Bills Thurman Thomas and Bruce Smith, after the team found itself in severe salary cap trouble; the roster dump began a period of downfall from which the Buffalo Bills did not reach the playoffs until the 2017 season.

In 2000, Reed signed a two-year contract with the Denver Broncos in June but was buried on the depth chart behind Rod Smith, Ed McCaffrey, Robert Brooks and Travis McGriff.[3] Reed eventually asked for his release from the Broncos after then Broncos Head Coach Mike Shanahan informed Reed that he would be inactive for their 2000 season opener and wanted to make a more immediate contribution.[4] He eventually joined the Washington Redskins and retired after the 2000 season.

NFL records

Reed ranks near the top in nearly all NFL career statistical receiving categories. He went over 1,000 yards four times in a 16-year career, is eighteenth in NFL history in total career receptions with 951, 17th in NFL history in total career receiving yards with 13,198. Reed is also fourteenth in NFL history in total career touchdown receptions with 87.

He also rushed for 500 yards and a touchdown on 75 carries. With the Bills, Reed played in four consecutive Super Bowls (1991–1994) and was selected to the Pro Bowl in seven consecutive seasons (1988–1994).

Reed set season career highs with 90 receptions in 1994, ten touchdowns in 1991, and 1,312 receiving yards in 1989.

A tribute to his incredible physical durability, Reed played in 234 NFL games between 1985 and 2000, the 85th most games played by any player in NFL history, including players in less physically demanding positions, such as kickers and punters.

Super Bowl records

In his four Super Bowls, Reed recorded 27 receptions, the second most total career Super Bowl receptions in NFL history (behind Rice's 33). His 323 total Super Bowl receiving yards are the third most in Super Bowl history (behind only Rice's 604 yards and Lynn Swann's 364).

"The Comeback"

In addition to the important role he played in taking the Bills to four consecutive Super Bowls, Reed is remembered particularly for his contributions to the Bills' January 3, 1993 playoff victory over the Houston Oilers, a game that has come to be known simply as "The Comeback." In the game, which Houston led decisively 35–3 during the third quarter, Reed caught 3 touchdowns in the second half, leading Buffalo's rally from a 32-point deficit[5] in what became the largest comeback in NFL history. Contributing substantially to "The Comeback", Reed finished the game with eight receptions for 136 yards and three touchdowns. The game has been enshrined in NFL history as one of the greatest games ever played. It also is recognized as one of the largest comebacks by any team in the history of all of the American professional sports.

Following the Bills' victory against the Oilers, Reed went on to catch eight passes for 152 yards in the Bills' 52–17 Super Bowl XXVII loss, on January 31, 1993, to the Dallas Cowboys.

Career statistics

Year Team Games Receptions Yards Average Longest Reception Touchdowns First Downs Fumbles Fumbles Lost
1985 BUF 16 48 637 13.3 32 4 0 0 0
1986 BUF 15 53 739 13.9 55 7 0 0 0
1987 BUF 12 57 752 13.2 40 5 0 0 0
1988 BUF 15 71 968 13.6 65 6 0 0 0
1989 BUF 16 88 1,312 13.7 78 9 0 0 0
1990 BUF 16 71 945 13.3 56 8 0 0 0
1991 BUF 16 81 1,113 13.7 55 10 62 0 0
1992 BUF 16 65 913 14.0 51 3 41 4 4
1993 BUF 15 52 854 16.4 65 6 32 1 1
1994 BUF 16 90 1,303 14.5 83 8 64 2 2
1995 BUF 6 24 312 13.0 41 3 10 2 2
1996 BUF 16 66 1,036 15.7 67 6 42 0 0
1997 BUF 15 60 880 14.7 77 5 39 0 0
1998 BUF 15 63 795 12.6 67 5 49 0 0
1999 BUF 16 52 536 10.3 30 1 31 0 0
2000 WSH 13 10 103 10.3 21 1 8 0 0
Total Total 234 951 13,198 13.9 83 87 378 9 9

[6]

Pro Football Hall of Fame candidacy

Reed became eligible for induction into the NFL's Pro Football Hall of Fame, the highest honor afforded a former NFL player, in 2006. However, he was not selected for induction in any of his first four years of eligibility, due in part to the logjam of accomplished wide receiver candidates, including Art Monk, Michael Irvin, and Cris Carter. Although Irvin, Monk and Carter are now enshrined as of 2007, 2008 and 2013 respectively, the logjam became worse than ever for Reed as he was once again overlooked in 2009, and 2010, which saw wide receiver candidates Jerry Rice and Tim Brown both eligible for the first time.[7] Rice has long been considered one of the greatest players in league history and was almost assured of being a first ballot Hall of Famer, making 2010 a long shot for Reed. As expected, Rice was inducted, which did clear some of the logjam going forward for Reed.[7]

In 2006, Reed was voted into the Buffalo Bills Wall of Fame, joining a number of other players from Bills history whose names are enshrined in the field-encircling cement of Buffalo's New Era Field.

The 2009 induction ceremony was overwhelmingly pro-Buffalo Bills because former teammate Bruce Smith and owner Ralph Wilson were both inducted. Through the night, Reed was referred to multiple times as "future Hall of Famer" with various speeches voicing their ringing endorsement for Reed as a candidate.

On January 9, 2011, Reed was announced to be one of the 15 finalists to be considered for the Hall of Fame Class of 2011. He, Cris Carter, and Tim Brown were once again passed over. The same trio were among the 15 finalists for the Hall of Fame Class of 2012, and all three were once again passed over.

On February 2, 2013, Reed failed to get voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[8] He made the cut from 15 finalists to 10 last-ballot candidates, though, while Tim Brown finished his candidacy in the group of 15. Cris Carter made the Hall of Fame.

On February 1, 2014, Reed was selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was inducted on August 2, 2014.

Television career

Since his NFL retirement in 2000, Reed has provided football commentary on the ESPN2 show, First Take, and appears periodically as a football analyst on NFL on Fox. He has also appeared on the Spike TV sports series Pros vs. Joes in the show's second season.

Legacy

On October 18, 2014, Kutztown University, Reed's alma mater, renamed University Field to Andre Reed Stadium in his honor in a ceremony.[9]

Popular culture

Reed is mentioned in the 1996 film Jerry Maguire as one of several NFL wide receivers with lucrative contracts, as Rod Tidwell,[10] a fictional wide receiver for the Arizona Cardinals, played by Cuba Gooding, Jr., tells his agent, played by Tom Cruise, that his contract warrants high pay.

The Andre Reed Foundation

The Andre Reed Foundation was established in 2010 to help underprivileged children reach their full potential and become responsible contributors to their communities.

References

  1. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/leaders/rec_career.htm
  2. ^ Buffalo Bills 50th Anniversary All-Time Team Archived July 19, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ "PRO FOOTBALL; Former Rivals Join Broncos". The New York Times. July 21, 2000.
  4. ^ "Reed Bucking The Broncos". CBS News. September 1, 2000.
  5. ^ "Bills and Eagles Turn Mountains Into Molehill; Buffalo Erases 32-Point Deficit". New York Times. January 4, 1993. Retrieved July 12, 2016.
  6. ^ "Andre Reed Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  7. ^ a b "Rice, Smith land spots in Hall of Fame". NBC Sports. Associated Press. February 6, 2010. Archived from the original on February 8, 2010. Retrieved February 6, 2010.
  8. ^ Corbett, Jim (February 2, 2013). "Parcells, Carter finally make Pro Football Hall of Fame". USA Today. Retrieved February 2, 2013.
  9. ^ Staff (September 18, 2014). "Kutztown University to name its football stadium in Andre Reed's honor". The Morning Call. Allentown, Pennsylvania. Retrieved September 23, 2014.
  10. ^ https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116695/

External links

1985 Buffalo Bills season

The 1985 Buffalo Bills season was the 26th season for the club and its sixteenth in the National Football League (NFL). It was Buffalo’s second-consecutive 2–14 season. Head coach Kay Stephenson was fired after an 0–4 start. Defensive coordinator Hank Bullough took over, going 2–10 for the remainder of the season.

1985 NFL Draft

The 1985 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. The draft was held April 30 and May 1, 1985, at the Omni Park Central Hotel in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

The first six selections of the draft made at least one Pro Bowl, and three of the first 16 picks — Bruce Smith, Chris Doleman, and Jerry Rice — have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.For the second consecutive season, there were no quarterbacks chosen in the first round on draft day, although University of Miami quarterback Bernie Kosar was selected by the Browns in the supplemental draft several months later.

1989 Buffalo Bills season

The 1989 Buffalo Bills season was the franchise's 30th overall season as a football team and the 20th in the [[National Football League. The Bills finished in first place in the AFC East and finished the National Football League's 1989 season with a record of 9 wins and 7 losses. Although Buffalo won the division and qualified for the postseason, their record was a drop off from their 12–4 mark in 1988.

1990 Buffalo Bills season

The 1990 Buffalo Bills season was the 31st for the franchise and the 21st in the National Football League. The team finished the year with a record of 13 wins and 3 losses, and first in the American Football Conference (AFC) East division. They were 8–0 at home for the second time in their franchise history. On the road, the Bills were 5–3. Buffalo qualified for their first Super Bowl appearance.

The Bills' offense was one of the best in the league; their 428 points (26.75 points per game) scored was first in the league, and since they only gave up 263 points (6th in the league), their point differential was 165 points (10.3 per game), which was the best in the NFL in 1990, as well as the best point-differential in franchise history. Buffalo's 48 offensive touchdowns (28 passing, 20 rushing) also led the league.

Defensive end Bruce Smith was named Associated Press Defensive Player of the Year for 1990, recording 101 tackles, four forced fumbles, and a career-high 19 sacks.The season was chronicled on October 2, 2008 for America's Game: The Missing Rings, as one of the five greatest NFL teams to never win the Super Bowl.

1993 Buffalo Bills season

The 1993 Buffalo Bills season was the 34th season for the Buffalo, New York team in the National Football League. The Buffalo Bills finished the National Football League's 1993 season with a record of 12 wins and 4 losses, and finished first in the AFC East division.

The Bills qualified for their fourth straight Super Bowl, where they faced the Dallas Cowboys in a rematch of the previous season's Super Bowl. However, just like with the previous Super Bowl, the Bills would lose to the Cowboys 13–30.

1996 Buffalo Bills season

The 1996 Buffalo Bills season was their 37th in the league. The team matched their previous season's record of 10–6 and qualified for the playoffs, for the second consecutive season and eighth time in nine seasons. It was the final season for All-Pro QB Jim Kelly as he retired after the Playoff loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars.

1999 Buffalo Bills season

The 1999 Buffalo Bills season was the 30th season for the team in the National Football League (NFL) and 40th overall. It would be the final season that Bruce Smith, Andre Reed, and Thurman Thomas, the last three players remaining from the Bills' Super Bowl teams were on the same team together. All three were released at the end of the season due to salary cap reasons.

The Bills surrendered only 229 points (14.3 points per game), the lowest total in franchise history in a 16-game season, and second-fewest in the league. Buffalo's 2,675 passing yards and 4,045 total yards allowed were both the fewest totals in the NFL in 1999.

The Bills finished in second place in the AFC East and finished the National Football League's 1999 season with a record of 11 wins and 5 losses. The Bills qualified for the postseason for the seventh time in the decade. They would lose to the Titans in the game called "The Music City Miracle".

The team would not make the playoffs again until 2017, where they were defeated by the Jacksonville Jaguars in the Wild-Card round.

2017 Kutztown Golden Bears football team

The 2017 Kutztown Golden Bears football team represents Kutztown University of Pennsylvania in Division II football as a member of the PSAC East Division.

Andre Reed Stadium

University Field at Andre Reed Stadium (or simply Andre Reed Stadium, formerly University Field) is an outdoor college football stadium located in Kutztown, Pennsylvania on the campus of Kutztown University of Pennsylvania. It is home to both Kutztown's football and field hockey programs competing in the PSAC. The stadium has a capacity of 5,600 making it the ninth largest venue in the PSAC.

University Field was renamed to University Field at Andre Reed Stadium on October 18, 2014 in a ceremony honoring Andre Reed, a former football player at Kutztown and in the National Football League who was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Buffalo Bills

The Buffalo Bills are a professional American football team based in the Buffalo–Niagara Falls metropolitan area. The Bills compete in the National Football League (NFL), as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. The team plays their home games at New Era Field in Orchard Park, New York. The Bills are the only NFL team that plays its home games in the state of New York. The Bills conduct summer training camp at St. John Fisher College in Pittsford, New York, an eastern suburb of Rochester.The Bills began play as an original franchise of the American Football League (AFL) in 1960. The club joined the NFL as a result of the AFL–NFL merger for the 1970 season. The 1964 and 1965 Bills were the only teams representing Buffalo that won major league professional sports championships ("back-to-back" American Football League Championships). The Bills are the only team to win four consecutive conference championships and are the only NFL team to lose four consecutive Super Bowl games. The team was owned by Ralph Wilson from the team's founding in 1960, until his death in 2014 at the age of 95. After his death, Wilson's estate reached an agreement to sell the team to Terry and Kim Pegula, which was approved by the other NFL team owners on October 8, 2014. The Bills formerly possessed the longest active playoff drought in any of the four major professional sports in North America: they did not qualify to play in the NFL playoffs from 1999 until 2017 and were the last NFL team (and last team in the major North American professional sports leagues overall) to compete in the playoffs in the 21st century.

Four Falls of Buffalo

Four Falls of Buffalo is a 2015 documentary film produced for ESPN's 30 for 30 series and directed by Ken Rodgers of NFL Films. The film profiles the Buffalo Bills teams of the early 1990s, when the franchise became the first team to play in — and lose — four consecutive Super Bowls.The film goes through the Bills four "Super Bowl" years featuring retrospectives and insight on such famous plays as Scott Norwood's 47-yard field goal miss at the end of Super Bowl XXV, Thurman Thomas' misplaced helmet at the start of Super Bowl XXVI, and Don Beebe's strip of Leon Lett's attempted fumble return in Super Bowl XXVII. Former Bills players Jim Kelly, Bruce Smith, Thurman Thomas, Andre Reed, Don Beebe, Darryl Talley, Steve Tasker, Frank Reich, coach Marv Levy, and general manager Bill Polian all gave extensive interviews for the film.A highlight of the documentary is an emotional interview with Norwood and former Bills special teams coach Bruce DeHaven conducted on the steps of Buffalo City Hall, the site where, twenty-five years before, the crowd of Bills fans had cheered for Norwood following his ill-fated kick.

J. Birney Crum Stadium

J. Birney Crum Stadium is a multi-purpose stadium in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in the United States. The stadium seats 15,000 and is used by several area high schools and the Pennsylvania Stoners of the NPSL (men) and the Northampton Laurels of the WPSL (women) soccer teams. J. Birney Crum Stadium is the home football field for each of Allentown's three high schools: William Allen High School, Louis E. Dieruff High School, and Allentown Central Catholic High School of the Eastern Pennsylvania Conference.

The stadium opened in 1948 as Allentown High School Stadium. It was alternately referred to as Allentown School District Stadium and ASD Stadium for short. In 1982, it was renamed in honor of J. Birney Crum, a football, basketball, and baseball coach at Allentown High School (present-day William Allen High School) who was inducted into the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame in 1974.

Crum was, at one point, the largest high school football stadium in Pennsylvania. But with the removal of the visitor side stands during renovations in 2002, it lost that standing.

Crum is also the home high school playing field for numerous Lehigh Valley Conference football players who went on to careers in the NFL, including Ed McCaffrey of the Denver Broncos and New York Giants, Andre Reed of the Buffalo Bills and Washington Redskins, and Tony Stewart of the Philadelphia Eagles, Cincinnati Bengals and Oakland Raiders.

The stadium was renovated in 2002 and FieldTurf was installed to replace the original natural grass surface.

In addition, the stadium also hosts the annual Drum Corps International Eastern Classic, Formally the DCI East Championships, hosting World Class Drum and Bugle corps from all over the country, and a large Fourth of July fireworks display that typically draws tens of thousands of spectators. The stadium also plays host to the Collegiate Marching Band Festival, held in late September/early October, which showcases college and university marching bands of all sizes and styles from across the Northeastern United States.

Kutztown Golden Bears

The Kutztown Golden Bears are the sports teams that represent Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, located in Kutztown, Pennsylvania. Kutztown University is a member of NCAA Division II and competes in the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC). The university sponsors eight men's and thirteen women's intercollegiate sports. In 2007–08, Kutztown University added women’s lacrosse and women’s bowling to the list of varsity sports that it offers.Kutztown won the Dixon Trophy in 2006, which is awarded to the PSAC school with the best overall athletic program that year. Kutztown became the fifth league school to win the award after placing second in the rankings in the 2003–04 and 2004–05 school years. Famous former athletes from Kutztown include football stars Andre Reed, John Mobley, Bruce Harper and Doug Dennison and baseball standout Ryan Vogelsong.

The university provides an array of intramural and club sports programs for students. Leagues and tournaments are organized by the Recreational Services department every semester, and range from badminton tournaments to rock climbing competitions.

Kutztown University of Pennsylvania

Kutztown University of Pennsylvania (commonly known as Kutztown University or KU) is a public university in Kutztown, Pennsylvania. It is one of fourteen schools that comprise the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) and is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, Pennsylvania Department of Education, NCATE, NLN, CSWE, NASM, and NASAD.First established in 1866, Kutztown University began as the Keystone Normal School based out of the presently-named Old Main Building and specializing in teacher education; in 1928 its name was changed to Kutztown State Teachers College. Eventually, the school expanded its programs outside education to be christened Kutztown State College in 1960 and finally Kutztown University of Pennsylvania in roughly twenty years later in 1983.Between four undergraduate colleges and graduate studies, Kutztown University now offers programs in the liberal arts and sciences, the visual and performing arts, business, education, and certain graduate studies. Eight intercollegiate men's sports and thirteen women's sports compete within the NCAA Division II and the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC).

Kutztown University is a census-designated place in Maxatawny Township just outside the borough of Kutztown and makes up the main population of the university. As of the 2010 census, the population was 2,918 residents.

List of Buffalo Bills Pro Bowl selections

This is a list of Buffalo Bills players who were elected to the Pro Bowl.

The year indicates when the game was played, not the season that it followed.

List of National Football League career receiving yards leaders

In American football, yards gained on a forward pass play are credited to the receiver as receiving yards. In the National Football League (NFL), 48 players have gained at least 10,000 receiving yards in their career: all but four are wide receivers; the rest are tight ends. Wide receiver Jerry Rice is the NFL's all-time leader in receiving yards, with 22,895. He is the only player to surpass 17,000 yards. Larry Fitzgerald is the only active player nearing this milestone.

Super Bowl XXV

Super Bowl XXV was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Buffalo Bills and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion New York Giants to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1990 season. The Giants defeated the Bills by the score of 20–19, winning their second Super Bowl.

The game was held at Tampa Stadium in Tampa, Florida, on January 27, 1991, during the time of the Gulf War. It was preceded by a memorable performance of "The Star-Spangled Banner" by Whitney Houston during the pre-game ceremonies. The American Broadcasting Company (ABC), who broadcast the game in the U.S., did not broadcast the Super Bowl XXV halftime show (headlined by the American boy band New Kids on the Block) live. Instead, the network televised a special ABC News report anchored by Peter Jennings on the progress of the war, and then aired the halftime show on tape delay after the game.

The Bills and their explosive no-huddle offense were making their first Super Bowl appearance after finishing the regular season with a 13–3 record, and leading the league in total points scored with 428. In advancing to their second Super Bowl, the Giants also posted a 13–3 regular season record, but with a ball-control offense and a defense that allowed a league-low 211 points. This thus became the first Super Bowl to feature two teams representing the same state, even though the Giants technically play in New Jersey.

The game is best remembered for Bills placekicker Scott Norwood's last-second missed field goal attempt that went wide right of the uprights, starting a four-game losing streak in the Super Bowl for the Bills. The game became the only Super Bowl decided by one point, and the first Super Bowl in which neither team committed a turnover. The Giants set a Super Bowl record holding possession of the ball for 40 minutes and 33 seconds. The Giants also overcame a 12–3 second-quarter deficit, and made a 75-yard touchdown drive that consumed a Super Bowl-record 9:29 off the clock. Giants running back Ottis Anderson, who carried the ball 21 times for 102 yards and one touchdown, was named Super Bowl MVP. He was the first awardee to receive the newly named "Pete Rozelle Trophy" (named for the former commissioner). Anderson also recorded one reception for seven yards.

Super Bowl XXVII

Super Bowl XXVII was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Buffalo Bills and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Dallas Cowboys to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1992 season. The Cowboys defeated the Bills by the score of 52–17, winning their third Super Bowl in team history, and their first one in 15 years. This game is tied with Super Bowl XXXVII as the third-highest scoring Super Bowl ever with 69 combined points. The Bills became the first team to lose three consecutive Super Bowls, and just the second team to play in three straight (the Miami Dolphins played in Super Bowls VI–VIII, winning VII and VIII). The game was played on January 31, 1993 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, the seventh Super Bowl held in the Greater Los Angeles Area. To date, this game represents the mid-point game in Super Bowl history as there are 26 Super Bowls both preceding and following it.

The Bills advanced to their third consecutive Super Bowl after posting an 11–5 regular season record, but entered the playoffs as a wild card after losing tiebreakers. The Cowboys were making their sixth Super Bowl appearance after posting a 13–3 regular season record. It was the first time that the two franchises had played each other since 1984.

The Cowboys scored 35 points off of a Super Bowl-record nine Buffalo turnovers, including three first half touchdowns. Bills backup quarterback Frank Reich, who replaced injured starter Jim Kelly in the second quarter, threw a 40-yard touchdown on the final play of the third quarter to cut the lead to 31–17. Dallas then scored three more touchdowns in the fourth quarter. Cowboys quarterback Troy Aikman was named Super Bowl MVP, completing 22 of 30 passes for 273 yards and four touchdowns for a passer rating of 140.6, while also rushing for 28 yards.

In response to the Fox Network's Super Bowl counterprogramming of a special episode of In Living Color during the previous year, the NFL booked Michael Jackson to perform during the entire Super Bowl XXVII halftime show. Jackson's performance started the league's trend of signing top acts to appear during the Super Bowl to attract more viewers and interest.

Super Bowl XXVIII

Super Bowl XXVIII was an American football game between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Dallas Cowboys and the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Buffalo Bills to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1993 season. The Cowboys defeated the Bills by the score of 30–13, winning their fourth Super Bowl in team history, tying the Pittsburgh Steelers and the San Francisco 49ers for most Super Bowl wins. The game was played on January 30, 1994, at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, Georgia. Since the 1993 regular season was conducted over 18 weeks (two byes per team), the traditional bye week between the conference championship games and the Super Bowl was not employed; the last time this happened was before Super Bowl XXV.

This is the only time that the same two teams have met in consecutive Super Bowls. The defending Super Bowl XXVII champion Cowboys finished with a 12–4 regular season record, despite key players missing games due to injuries. The Bills were making their fourth consecutive Super Bowl appearance, but still seeking their first title, after also finishing with a 12–4 regular season record, largely through the strength of their no-huddle offense.

After trailing 13–6 at halftime, the Cowboys scored 24 unanswered points in the second half. The Bills had built their lead off of running back Thurman Thomas' 4-yard touchdown run. But just 45 seconds into the third quarter, Thomas was stripped of the ball, and Dallas safety James Washington returned the fumble 46 yards for a touchdown to tie the game. From there, Cowboys running back Emmitt Smith, who was named the Super Bowl MVP, largely took over the game. On Dallas' next possession, Smith was handed the ball seven times on an eight-play, 64-yard drive that was capped off with his 15-yard touchdown run. He later scored on a 1-yard touchdown in the fourth quarter. Overall, Smith had 30 carries for 132 yards and 2 touchdowns, while also catching 4 passes for 26 yards.

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