Anastasia Pustovoitova

Anastasia Vyacheslavovna Pustovoitova (Russian: Анастасия Вячеславовна Пустовойтова; born 10 February 1981) is a Russian association football referee. Previously, she was a Russian women's international footballer who played as a defender.

Anastasia Pustovoitova
2019-05-18 Fußball, Frauen, UEFA Women's Champions League, Olympique Lyonnais - FC Barcelona StP 0967 LR10 by Stepro-2
Personal information
Full name Anastasia Vyacheslavovna Pustovoitova
Date of birth 10 February 1981 (age 38)
Playing position Defender
National team
Russia 2 (0)

Refereeing career
International
Years League Role
2009– FIFA listed Referee

Playing career

Pustovoitova was a member of the Russia women's national football team and the club Ryazan as a defender. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup.[1]

Refereeing career

Pustovoitova became a FIFA listed referee in 2009. Pustovoitova was appointed to be an official at the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 in the Netherlands.[2]

On December 3rd, 2018, it was announced that Poustovoitova had been appointed to be a referee for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France.[3] After the conclusion of the round of 16, FIFA announced that Pustovoitova was selected as one of 11 referees who would be assigned to matches during the final 8 matches of the tournament.[4]

In April 2019, she was featured on the YouTube channel “KraSava”, which is run by the popular video blogger Evgeny Savin.[5]

In May 2019, Pustovoitova was appointed to officiate the 2018-19 UEFA Women's Champions League Final between Olympique Lyonnais and FC Barcelona in Budapest.[6]

References

  1. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003 - Technical Report" (PDF). FIFA Women's World Cup United States 2003. FIFA. 2003. Retrieved 28 September 2007.
  2. ^ "Women's EURO referees - the tournament's 17th team". UEFA.com. 22 June 2017. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  3. ^ FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup 2019™ - News - Match officials appointed for FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Retrieved 24 June 2019.
  4. ^ "Refereeing - Media briefing" (PDF). FIFA.com. 26 June 2019. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  5. ^ "Женщина-судья - про хамство на поле / лесбиянок в футболе / взятки судьям / мечту о дебюте в РПЛ" (in Russian). youtube.com. Archived from the original on 20 May 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  6. ^ "Referee Pustovoitova relishing Budapest assignment". UEFA.com. 17 May 2019. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
2010 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship

The 2010 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship football tournament took place between 8 April and 26 June. Germany was the defending champion. Spain won the final on penalties 4–1 against the Republic of Ireland.

Spain, Ireland and third placed Germany qualified to the 2010 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.

2012 UEFA Women's U-19 Championship First qualifying round

2012 UEFA Women's U-19 Championship First Qualifying Round was the first round of qualifications for the Final Tournament of 2012 UEFA Women's U-19 Championship. They were played in September 2011. 40 teams were split into 10 groups of 4 and teams in each group played each other once. Turkey received a bye to the final as host. The top two teams in each group and the best third-placed team entered the 2012 UEFA Women's U-19 Championship Second qualifying round to join England, France and Germany.

The host of each mini tournament is listed in italics.

2012 UEFA Women's U-19 Championship Second qualifying round

The 2012 UEFA Women's U-19 Championship Second qualifying round will determine the participating teams at the 2012 UEFA Women's U-19 Championship held in Turkey.

2012 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

The UEFA Women's U-19 Championship 2012 Final Tournament was held in Antalya, Turkey between 2 and 14 July 2012. Players born after 1 January 1993 were eligible to participate in this competition.

2013 UEFA Women's U-19 Championship First qualifying round

2013 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship First Qualifying Round will be the first round of qualifications for the Final Tournament of 2013 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship, which will be held in Wales.

The 40 teams were divided into 10 groups of four teams, with each group being contested as a mini-tournament, hosted by one of the group's teams. After all matches have been played, the 10 group winners and 10 group runners-up along with the best third-placed team will advance to the Second qualifying round.

Wales qualified as hosts while England, France and Germany received byes to the second round as the sides with the highest coefficients.

The draw was made on 15 November 2011 at UEFA headquarters in Nyon. Matches was played from 20 to 25 October 2012.

2013–14 UEFA Women's Champions League

The 2013–14 UEFA Women's Champions League was the 13th edition of the European women's championship for football clubs. The final was held at Estádio do Restelo, Lisbon, Portugal.

German team VfL Wolfsburg won the title over Swedish club Tyresö FF after turning a 0–2 into a 4–3 win. Wolfsburg became the third side to defend the Champions League title.

2014 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

The UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship 2014 Final Tournament was held in Norway from 15 to 27 July 2014. The first qualification matches were played on 21 September 2013.

A competition record of 48 participating nations was set. For the first time Albania, Malta and Montenegro enter the competition.The Netherlands won the final over Spain 1–0.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 3

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA Group 3 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group comprised Denmark, Iceland, Israel, Malta, Serbia and Switzerland.

The group winners qualified directly for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. Among the seven group runners-up, the four best (determined by records against the first-, third-, fourth- and fifth-placed teams only for balance between different groups) advanced to the play-offs.After winning 9–0 at home against Israel on 14 June 2014, Switzerland qualified for the 2015 Women's World Cup on 15 June after Denmark's match with Iceland ended in a draw, which meant that Switzerland was assured group winners. Switzerland also became the first European nation to qualify for the 2015 Women's World Cup.

2015–16 UEFA Women's Champions League qualifying round

The 2015–16 UEFA Women's Champions League qualifying round was played on 11, 13 and 16 August 2015. A total of 32 teams competed in the qualifying round to decide eight of the 32 places in the knockout phase of the 2015–16 UEFA Women's Champions League.

2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup

The 2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup was the fifth edition of the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup, the biennial international women's youth football championship contested by the under-17 national teams of the member associations of FIFA. The tournament was held in Jordan from 30 September to 21 October 2016.While the role of women in sport was regarded as controversial due to cultural and religious conservatism in some countries of the Middle East, this tournament was the first female FIFA tournament held in the region.

2017 Algarve Cup

The 2017 Algarve Cup was the 24th edition of the Algarve Cup, an invitational women's football tournament held annually in Portugal. It took place from 1 to 8 March.

2018–19 UEFA Women's Champions League knockout phase

The 2018–19 UEFA Women's Champions League knockout phase began on 12 September 2018 and ended on 18 May 2019 with the final at Groupama Arena in Budapest, Hungary, to decide the champions of the 2018–19 UEFA Women's Champions League. A total of 32 teams competed in the knockout phase.Times are CET/CEST, as listed by UEFA (local times, if different, are in parentheses).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

The United States entered the competition as defending champions after winning the 2015 edition in Canada and successfully defended their title with a 2–0 victory over the Netherlands in the final. In doing so, they secured their record fourth title and became the second nation, after Germany, to have successfully retained the title.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA play-offs

The UEFA play-offs of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition involve the four runners-up with the best records among all seven groups in the qualifying group stage.

2019 UEFA Women's Champions League Final

The 2019 UEFA Women's Champions League Final was the final match of the 2018–19 UEFA Women's Champions League, the 18th season of Europe's premier women's club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 10th season since it was renamed from the UEFA Women's Cup to the UEFA Women's Champions League. This was the first time since the final is played as a single match that a host city for the Women's Champions League final was not automatically assigned by which city won the bid to host the men's Champions League final, although the same association is still allowed to host both finals by the UEFA bid regulations. It was played at the Groupama Arena in Budapest, Hungary on 18 May 2019, between French side Lyon and Spanish side Barcelona.

Lyon won the final 4–1 for their fourth consecutive and sixth overall UEFA Women's Champions League title.

Football at the 2009 Summer Universiade – Women's tournament

The women's tournament of football at the 2009 Summer Universiade in Serbia began on June 30 and ended on July 10, 2009.

Pustovoitova

Pustovoitova is a surname. Notable persons with that name include:

Anastasia Pustovoitova (born 1981), Russian footballer

Daria Pustovoitova (born 1994), Russian chess player

Sweden women's national football team

The Sweden women's national football team (Swedish: svenska damfotbollslandslaget) represents Sweden in international women's football competition and is controlled by the Swedish Football Association. The national team has won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers (1987, 1995, 2001). The team has participated in six Olympic Games, eight World Cups, as well as ten European Championships. Sweden won bronze medals at the World Cups in 1991, 2011 and 2019.

The 2003 World Cup-final was the second most watched event in Sweden that year. Lotta Schelin is the top goalscorer in the history of Sweden with 85 goals. Schelin surpassed Hanna Ljungberg's 72-goal record against Germany on 29 October 2014. The player with the most caps is Therese Sjögran, with 214. The team was coached by Thomas Dennerby from 2005 to 2012, and Pia Sundhage from 2012 to 2017. The head coach is Peter Gerhardsson.

After winning the two qualifying matches against Denmark for the Beijing 2008 Olympics, the Swedish Olympic Committee approved of record increases in investments for the women's team. The new budget granted over a million SEK (about US$150,000) for the team and 150,000 SEK (about US$25,000) per player for developing physical fitness. The new grants are almost a 100% increase of the 2005 and 2006 season funds.The developments and conditions of the Sweden women's national football team can be seen in the Sveriges Television documentary television series The Other Sport from 2013.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams (from 12 teams in the previous edition).The Netherlands were declared as hosts by the UEFA Executive Committee on 4 December 2014.Germany's 22-year reign as champions of Europe was ended after losing 1–2 to Denmark in the quarter-finals. In addition it was only Germany's second loss in the finals since 1993. Another former winner, Norway, lost to both finalists, the Netherlands and Denmark, and ended without goals or points.

The Netherlands won their first ever title by beating fellow first time finalists, Denmark, 4–2 in the final.

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