Amputee football

Amputee football is a disabled sport played with seven players on each team (six outfield players and one goalkeeper). Outfield players have lower extremity amputations, and goalkeepers have an upper extremity amputation. Outfield players use loftstrand (forearm) crutches, and play without their prosthesis.

Amputee football
ZaryenGamePhoto
Highest governing bodyWorld Amputee Football Federation
Characteristics
ContactContact
Team members7
Mixed genderSingle
TypeOutdoor (mainly)
2017EAFCfinalTURvsENG (46)
2017 European Amputee Football Championship final match between Turkey (red/black) and England. (blue).

Around the world

There are several amputee football associations around the world. A couple examples of this are the England Amputee Association and The Irish Amputee Football Association.[1] Each organization promotes the advancement of the sport and that it gains more recognition. The England Amputee Football Association states their main goal on their website as: "The England Amputee Football Association's aim is to provide all amputees, people with congenital limb deficiencies and persons with restricted use of limbs, with the opportunity to play football locally, nationally and internationally."[2]

Amputee Football World Cup

Former name : Amputee Football World Championships (from first to 2003)

Number Year Host City Teams Gold Silver Bronze 4th Place
1 1984 United States Seattle, United States
2 1988 United States Seattle, United States  El Salvador  USA  ENG
3 1989 United States Seattle, United States
4 1991 Uzbekistan Tashkent, Uzbekistan
5 1998 England Manchester, England  RUS  UZB  BRA
6 2000 United States Seattle, United States  BRA  RUS  UKR
7 2001 Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil  BRA  RUS  ENG
8 2002 Russia Sochi, Russia  RUS  BRA  UZB
9 2003 Uzbekistan Tashkent, Uzbekistan 4  RUS  UKR  BRA  UZB
10 2005 Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 6  BRA  RUS  ENG  UKR
11 2007 Turkey Antalya, Turkey 10  UZB  RUS Turkey TUR ?
12 2010 Argentina Crespo, Argentina  UZB  ARG Turkey TUR  RUS
13 2012 Russia Kaliningrad, Russia 12  UZB  RUS Turkey TUR  ARG
14 2014 Mexico Culiacán, Mexico 23  RUS  ANG Turkey TUR  POL
15 2018 Mexico San Juan de los Lagos, Mexico  ANG Turkey TUR  BRA  MEX

Other Championships

Year Event Host Date Gold Silver Bronze
1999 1st Open European Championships  UKR Kiev  BRA  RUS  UZB
2006 Volgograd Open Championships  RUS Volgograd Sep 24 – 30  RUS  ENG  UZB
2007 1st All-Africa Amputee Soccer Tournament  SLE Freetown Feb  GHA  LIB  SLE
2008 European Amputee Football Championship  TUR Istanbul Oct 2–10  RUS Turkey TUR  ENG
2017 6th Amp Futbol Cup  POL Warsaw Jun 24–25  ENG  POL  JPN
2017 European Amputee Football Championship  TUR Istanbul Oct 1–10 Turkey TUR  ENG  POL

Rules

The official FIFA sanctioned rules are:[3]

  • An amputee is defined as someone who is 'abbreviated' at or near the ankle or wrist.
  • Outfield players may have two hands but only one leg, whereas goalkeepers may have two feet but only one hand.
  • The game is played with metal crutches and without prostheses, the only exception being that bi-lateral amputees may play with a prosthesis.
  • Players may not use crutches to advance, control or block the ball. Such an action will be penalised in the same way as a handball infringement. However, incidental contact between crutch and ball is tolerated.
  • Players may not use their residual limbs to voluntarily advance, control or block the ball. Such an action will be penalised in the same way as a handball infringement. However, incidental contact between residual limb and ball is tolerated.
  • Shin pads must be worn.
  • Use of a crutch against a player will lead to ejection from the game and a penalty kick for the opposing team.
  • The pitch measures a maximum of 70 x 60 metres
  • The dimensions of the goals are 2.2 metres maximum (height) x 5 metres maximum (width) x 1 metre (depth)
  • A FIFA standard ball is used
  • Games consist of two 25-minute halves (variable according to the tournament), with a ten-minute rest period in between
  • Both teams are allowed a two-minute time-out per game
  • Offside rules do not apply in amputee football
  • International rules stipulate that a team be made up of six outfield players and a goalkeeper. However, certain tournaments require teams of four outfield players plus goalkeeper, as was the case in Sierra Leone.
  • A goalkeeper is not permitted to leave his or her area. Should this occur deliberately, the goalkeeper will be ejected from the game and the opposing team awarded a penalty kick.
  • An unlimited number of substitutions can be made, at any point during the game.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Home". Irish Amputee Football Association. 2015-12-07. Retrieved 2016-02-18.
  2. ^ "Home". Theeafa.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-02-18.
  3. ^ "Amputee football – The Rules of the Game". FIFA.com. 2016-02-04. Retrieved 2016-02-18.

External links

2012 Amputee Football World Cup

The 2012 Amputee Football World Cup, aka 2012 Amputee Soccer World Cup, was the 13th edition of the biannual international competition of amputee football national men's teams. It was organized by the World Amputee Football Federation (WAFF), and was held in Kaliningrad, Russia between October 7–14, 2012. The previous event took place in Argentina in 2010. Mexico was selected by majority vote on the WAFF 2012 Congress to host the next World Cup in 2014.

The competition was originally planned to be held in Japan. However, the venue was changed due to the April 2011 Fukushima earthquake.Uzbekistan won the title for the three consecutive time, defeating the sixth-time champions Russia in the final. Turkey became bronze medalist before Argentina.

2014 Amputee Football World Cup

The 2014 Amputee Football World Cup, aka 2014 Amputee Soccer World Cup, was the 14th edition of the biannual international competition of amputee football national men's teams. It was organized by the World Amputee Football Federation (WAFF), and was held in Culiacán, Mexico between November 30–December 8, 2014. The previous event took place in Russia in 2012.Russia won the title for the seventh time, defeating Angola in the final. Turkey became bronze medalist before Poland.

2017 European Amputee Football Championship

The 2017 European Amputee Football Championship was the first edition of the annual international competition of amputee football national men's teams. It was organized by the European Amputee Football Federation (EAFF), and was held in Istanbul, Turkey between October 1–10, 2017. The championship's drawing ceremony took place in Riva, Beykoz, Istanbul on August 19 to determine the groups.Turkey won the title for the first time, defeating England in the final. Poland became bronze medalist before Spain. All matches were played at the Turkish Football Federation Hasan Doğan National Teams Camp and Training Facility in Riva, Beykoz but the final at Vodafone Park in Beşiktaş.

A2 (classification)

A2 is an amputee sport classification used by the International Sports Organization for the Disabled (ISOD).for people with acquired or congenital amputations. A2 sportspeople have one leg amputated above the knee. Their amputations impact their sport performance, including having balance issues, increased energy costs, higher rates of oxygen consumption, and issues with their gait.

Sports people in this class are eligible to participate in include athletics, swimming, sitting volleyball, archery, weightlifting, wheelchair basketball, cycling, amputee basketball, amputee football, lawn bowls, and sitzball.

A4 (classification)

A4 is an amputee sport classification used by the International Sports Organization for the Disabled (ISOD).for people with acquired or congenital amputations. People in this class have one leg amputated below the knee. Their amputations impact their sport performance, including having balance issues, increased energy costs, higher rates of oxygen consumption, and issues with their gait. Sports people in this class are eligible to participate in include athletics, swimming, sitting volleyball, archery, weightlifting, wheelchair basketball, amputee basketball, amputee football, lawn bowls, and sitzball.

A6 (classification)

A6 is an amputee sport classification used by the International Sports Organization for the Disabled (ISOD).for people with acquired or congenital amputations. People in this class have one arm amputated above or through the elbow joint. Their amputations impact their sport performance, including being more prone to overuse injuries. Sports people in this class are eligible to participate in include athletics, swimming, cycling, amputee basketball, amputee football, lawn bowls, and sitzball.

A8 (classification)

A8 is an amputee sport classification used by the International Sports Organization for the Disabled (ISOD).for people with acquired or congenital amputations. People in this class have one arm amputated below the elbow, but through or above the wrist joint. Their amputations impact their sport performance, including being more prone to overuse injuries. Sports people in this class are eligible to participate in include athletics, swimming, cycling, amputee basketball, amputee football, lawn bowls, and sitzball.

Amputee sports classification

Amputee sports classification is a disability specific sport classification used for disability sports to facilitate fair competition among people with different types of amputations. This classification was set up by International Sports Organization for the Disabled (ISOD), and is currently managed by IWAS who ISOD merged with in 2005. Several sports have sport specific governing bodies managing classification for amputee sportspeople.

Classification for amputee athletes began in the 1950s and 1960s. By the early 1970s, it was formalized with 27 different classes. This as reduced to 12 in 1976, and then down to 9 in 1992 ahead of the Barcelona Paralympics. By the 1990s, a number of sports had developed their own classification systems that in some cases were not compatible with the ISOD system. This included swimming, table tennis and equestrian as they tried to integrate multiple types of disabilities in their sports.Amputee sportspeople have specific challenges that different from other types of disability sportspeople.

The classes for ISOD's amputee sports classification system are A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8 and A9. The first four are for people with lower limb amputations. A5 through A8 are for people with upper limb amputations. A9 is for people with combinations of upper and lower limb amputations. The classification system is largely medical, and generally has four stages. The first is a medical examination. The second is observation at practice or training. The third is observation during competition. The final is being put into a classification group. There is some variance to this based on sport specific needs.

European Amputee Football Federation

The European Amputee Football Federation (EAFF) is the administrative body for amputee football in Europe representing the national amputee football associations, although some member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia.

FIM Snowcross World Championship

The FIM Snowcross World Championship is a snowmobile racing championship, inaugurated in 2004. The championship was preceded by the FIM Snowcross World Cup in 2003. Winner of the World Cup was Janne Tapio, Finland.

Greek Amputee Football Association

The Greek Amputee Football Association (Greek: Ελληνική Ένωση Ακρωτηριασμένων Ποδοσφαιριστών, Elliniki Enosi Akrotiriasmenon Podosfairiston) is the Greek governing body of amputee football and represents Greece at international events and competitions. The association was founded with the support of EAFF. In February 2016, Amputee Football Greece became the 14th European national team.

Individual sport

An individual sport is a sport in which participants compete as individuals. However, team competitions in individual sports also occur, such as relay race, the Davis Cup and the Fed Cup.

Liberia women's national football team

The Liberia women's national football team is the women's national team representing the country in international competitions. They have played in five FIFA recognised matches.

Noah Grove

Noah Grove (born in Frederick, Maryland on May 1, 1999) was a member of the gold medal winning US team in para ice hockey at the 2018 Winter Paralympics. He also played amputee football at the 2014 World Cup.

TFF Riva Facility

TFF Riva Facility, short for Turkish Football Federation Riva Hasan Doğan National Teams Camp and Training Facility, (Turkish: Türkiye Futbol Federasyonu Riva Hasan Doğan Milli Takımlar Kamp ve Eğitim Tesisleri), is a facility of the Turkish Football Federation (TFF) for camp and training purposes of all Turkey national football teams. It is located in Istanbul Province, Turkey

The facility is situated in Riva village of Beykoz district in the north of Istanbul Province west of Riva River.. It was officially opened on July 4, 2014, and was named in honor of Hasan Doğan (1956–2008), whose presidency of the TFF lasted only several months due to his unexpected death. Owned and operated by the TFF, it consists of three building blocks, namely Block A for offices and conference rooms, Block B for health care and swimming pool and Block C for hotel and restaurant. The covered area of the buildings is 17,857 m2 (192,210 sq ft). An open-air parking lot for 50 cars is available.The facility was certificated in Golden category of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standard.Three more football fields were built in addition to the initial four football fields. One field features hybrid grass ground, two fields have artificial turf ground and four are natural grass fields. All football fields are have FIFA-standard soccer-specific stadium dimensions. The football fields are equipped with floodlight. Three football fields have 50-seat covered bleacher each, and the football field #4 has a covered bleacher of 100-spectator capacity.The facility was built in 14 months on a property, which was endowed to the TFF on March 29, 2013. The groundbreaking ceremony took place on April 9, 2013. The cost of the construction amounted to 60 million. amount of 16 million. Spor Toto Organization contributed to the investment with 16 million.The facility hosts training, international friendly and official matches of national football, futsal, and amputee football teams of both gender and all age groups. 2017 European Amputee Football Championship matches, with the exception of the final match, were played at the facility.

Team Zaryen

Team Zaryen is a Haitian Amputee soccer team, located in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Zaryen is the Creole word for Tarantula.

When asked why the tarantula was chosen to represent the soccer team the players give two answers. First because when a tarantula attacks, it pursues its enemy slowly and is deadly with just one bite. A tarantula is a spider known to carry on despite the loss of a leg and with the ability to regrow a lost limb. Another reason for the team mascot is because the tarantula has so many legs, much like the appearance of the soccer players with their loftstrand (forearm) crutches.

Amputee soccer is an adapted sport played with 7 players on each team (6 field players and 1 goal keeper) on a smaller field. Field players have lower extremity amputations, and goalkeepers have an upper extremity amputation. Field players use loftstrand (forearm) crutches, and play without their prosthesis.

Turkey national amputee football team

Turkey national amputee football team is the men's national team of Turkey. It is governed by the Turkish Disabled Sports Federation (Turkish: Türkiye Bedensel Engelliler Spor Federasyonu, TBESF), and takes part in international amputee football competitions.

World Blind Football Championships

The World Blind Football Championships, formerly the Football-5-a-Side World Championships, were played for the first time in 1998.

World Para Snowboard Championships

World Para Snowboard Championships, was played first time at 2015.

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