Amphillogiai

In Greek mythology, the Amphillogiai (Ancient Greek: Ἀμφιλλογίαι; singular: Amphillogia) were goddesses of disputes. Hesiod's Theogony identifies them as the daughters of Eris ("strife") and sisters of Ponos ("Hardship"), Lethe ("Forgetfulness"), Limos ("Starvation"), Algae ("Pains"), Hysminai ("Battles"), Makhai ("Wars"), Phonoi ("Murders"), Androktasiai (Manslaughters"), Neikea ("Quarrels"), Pseudea ("Lies"), Logoi ("Stories"), Dysnomia ("Anarchy"), Ate ("Ruin"), and Horkos ("Oath").[1]

References

 This article incorporates text from Theogeny, by Hesiod, translated by Hugh G. Evelyn-White, a publication from 1914 now in the public domain in the United States.

  1. ^ Richard Caldwell, Hesiod's Theogony, Focus Publishing/R. Pullins Company (June 1, 1987). ISBN 978-0-941051-00-2.

External links

Aceso

Aceso (Greek: Ἀκεσώ) was the Greek goddess of the healing process.

Achlys

Achlys (Ancient Greek: Ἀχλύς "mist" or "darkness") is an ancient Greek goddess, symbol mist of death; in Greek mythology, according to some ancient cosmogonies, is the eternal Night before Chaos. If Achlys was a daughter of Nyx (Night) then she may have been numbered amongst the Keres.

Aergia

In Greek mythology, Aergia ( Ancient Greek: Ἀεργία, "inactivity") is the personification of sloth, idleness, indolence and laziness. She is the translation of the Latin Socordia, or Ignavia. She was translated to Greek because Hyginus mentioned her based on a Greek source, and thus can be considered as both a Greek and Roman goddess.

Aglaea

Aglaea () or Aglaïa (; Greek: Ἀγλαΐα "splendor, brilliant, shining one") is the name of several figures in Greek mythology, the best known of which is one of the three Charites or Graces.

Androktasiai

In Greek mythology, the Androctasiae or Androktasiai (Ancient Greek: Ἀνδροκτασίαι; singular: Androktasia) were the female personifications of manslaughter, and daughters of the goddess of strife and discord, Eris. This name is also used for all of Eris' children collectively, as a whole group.

Hesiod in the Theogony names their mother as Eris ("Discord"), and their siblings as: Ponos (Hardship), Lethe (Forgetfulness), Limos (Starvation), the Algea (Pains), the Hysminai (Battles), the Makhai (Wars), the Phonoi (Murders), the Neikea (Quarrels), the Pseudea (Lies), the Logoi (Stories), the Amphillogiai (Disputes), Dysnomia (Anarchy), Ate (Ruin), and Horkos (Oath) In the epic poem the Shield of Heracles, attributed to Hesiod, Androktasia (singular) was one of the many figures, depicted on Heracles' shield.

Apollonis

Apollonis (; Ancient Greek: Ἀπoλλωνίς means "of Apollo") was one of the three younger Mousai Apollonides (Muses) in Greek mythology and daughters of Apollo who were worshipped in Delphi where the Temple of Apollo and the Oracle were located. The three sisters, Cephisso, Apollonis, and Borysthenis, are also known as Nētē, Mesē, and Hypatē where their names are synonymous with those of the lowest, middle, and highest chords of a lyre, further characterizing the Muses as the daughters of Apollo.

Cornucopia

In classical antiquity, the cornucopia (from Latin cornu copiae), also called the horn of plenty, was a symbol of abundance and nourishment, commonly a large horn-shaped container overflowing with produce, flowers or nuts.

Dolos (mythology)

In Greek mythology, Dolos or Dolus (Ancient Greek: Δόλος "Deception") is the spirit of trickery and guile. He is also a master at cunning deception, craftiness, and treachery. He was the son of Gaia (Earth) and Aether (Hyginus, Fabulae Theogony 3) or Erebus and Nyx (Cicero, De Natura Deorum 3.17).Dolos is an apprentice of the Titan Prometheus and a companion of the Pseudologi (Lies). His female counterpart is Apate, who is the goddess of fraud and deception. His Roman equivalent is Mendacius. There are even some stories of Dolos tricking gods into lies.

Erebus

In Greek mythology, Erebus , also Erebos (Ancient Greek: Ἔρεβος, Érebos, "deep darkness, shadow" or "covered"), was often conceived as a primordial deity, representing the personification of darkness; for instance, Hesiod's Theogony identifies him as one of the first five beings in existence, born of Chaos.

Hemera

In Greek mythology Hemera (; Ancient Greek: Ἡμέρα [hɛːméra] "Day") was the personification of day and one of the Greek primordial deities. She is the goddess of the daytime and, according to Hesiod, the daughter of Erebus and Nyx (the goddess of night).

Horkos

In Greek mythology, the figure of Horkos (Greek: Ὅρκος, "oath") personifies the curse that will be inflicted on any person who swears a false oath. In Aesop’s Fables there is a cautionary story, numbered 239 in the Perry Index, indicating that retribution is swift where the god is defied. Oath-taking and the penalties for perjuring oneself played an important part in the Ancient Greek concept of justice.

Limos

Limos (Greek: Λιμός; "starvation"), Roman Fames , was the goddess of starvation in ancient Greek religion. She was opposed by Demeter, goddess of grain and the harvest with whom Ovid wrote Limos could never meet, and Plutus, the god of wealth and the bounty of rich harvests.

Megaera

Megaera (; Ancient Greek: Μέγαιρα, English translation: "the jealous one") is one of the Erinyes, Eumenides or "Furies" in Greek mythology. Lamprière's Classical Dictionary states "According to the most received opinions, they were three in number, Tisiphone, "Megaera ... daughter of Nox and Acheron", and Alecto".Megaera is the cause of jealousy and envy, and punishes people who commit crimes, especially marital infidelity. Like her sisters Alecto and Tisiphone, as well as the Melian Nymphs, she was born of the blood of Uranus when Cronus castrated him.In modern French (mégère), Portuguese (megera), Modern Greek (μέγαιρα), Italian (megera) and Russian (мегера), this name denotes a jealous or spiteful woman - Google translates all five as "shrew".

Necklace of Harmonia

The Necklace of Harmonia was a fabled object in Greek mythology that, according to legend, brought great misfortune to all of its wearers or owners, who were primarily queens and princesses of the ill-fated House of Thebes.

Neikea

In Greek mythology, the Neikea (Greek: Νείκεα; singular: Νεῖκος Neikos "quarrels") were spirits of arguments. Hesiod's Theogony identifies them as children of Eris (strife) through parthenogenesis and siblings of Ponos ("Hardship"), Lethe ("Forgetfulness"), Limos ("Starvation"), Algae ("Pains"), Hysminai ("Battles"), Makhai ("Wars"), Phonoi ("Murders"), Androktasiai (Manslaughters"), Pseudea ("Lies"), Logoi ("Stories"), Amphillogiai ("Disputes"), Dysnomia ("Anarchy"), Ate ("Ruin"), and Horkos ("Oath").

Nesoi

The Nesoi (Greek Nῆσοι "islands"), in ancient Greek religion, were the goddesses of islands. Each island was said to have its own personification. They were classified as one of the Protogenoi, otherwise known as ancient elemental Greek primordial deities. The Nesoi were thought to have been Ourea who were cast under the sea during one of Poseidon's rages.

Perses (Titan)

Perses (; Ancient Greek: Πέρσης) was the son of the Titan Crius and Eurybia. His name is derived from the Ancient Greek word perthō (πέρθω – "to sack", "to ravage", "to destroy"), the fact of which may have given scholars the impression that Perses was perhaps the Titan god of destruction. He was wed to Asteria (daughter of Phoebe and Coeus). They had one child noted in mythology, Hecate, honoured by Zeus above all others as the goddess of magic, crossroads, and witchcraft.

Phonoi

In Greek mythology, the Phonoi (Ancient Greek: Φονος; singular: Phonos) were male personifications of murder. Hesiod in the Theogony names their mother as Eris ("Discord"), and their siblings as: Ponos (Hardship), Lethe (Forgetfulness), Limos (Starvation), the Algea (Pains), the Hysminai (Battles), the Makhai (Wars), the Androktasiai (Manslaughters), the Neikea (Quarrels), the Pseudea (Lies), the Logoi (Stories), the Amphillogiai (Disputes), Dysnomia (Anarchy), Ate (Ruin), and Horkos (Oath) In the epic poem the Shield of Heracles, attributed to Hesiod, Phonos (singular) was one of the many figures, depicted on Heracles' shield.

Ponos

Ponos or Ponus (Ancient Greek: Πόνος Pónos; "toil, labour") was the god of hard labor and toil in Greek mythology. His mother was the goddess Eris ("discord"), who was the daughter of Nyx ("night"). He was the brother of Algos, Lethe, Limos, and Horkos. According to some accounts, Ponos attested as the son of Nyx and Erebus ("darkness").

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.