Amerotyphlops

Amerotyphlops is a genus of snakes in the family Typhlopidae.

Amerotyphlops
Typhlops reticulatus Peru 03
Amerotyphlops reticulatus,
reticulate worm snake
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Suborder: Serpentes
Family: Typhlopidae
Genus: Amerotyphlops
Hedges, Marion, Lipp, Marin & Vidal, 2014

Distribution

The 15 species of this genus are found from Mexico through South America.[1]

Species

The following species are recognized as being valid.[1]

Nota bene: A binomial authority in parentheses indicates that the species was originally described in a genus other than Amerotyphlops.

References

  1. ^ a b Genus Amerotyphlops at The Reptile Database. www.reptile-database.org.

Further reading

  • Hedges, S. Blair; Marion, Angela B.; Lipp, Kelly M.; Marin, Julie; Vidal, Nicolas (2014). "A taxonomic framework for typhlopid snakes from the Caribbean and other regions (Reptilia, Squamata)". Caribbean Herpetology 49: 1-61. (Amerotyphlops, new genus, pp. 43-44).
Basin worm snake

The Basin worm snake (Amerotyphlops minuisquamus) is a species of snake in the Typhlopidae family. It has been reported in Colombia, Peru, Venezuela and Guyana.

Brongersma's worm snake

Brongersma's worm snake (Amerotyphlops brongersmianus) is a harmless blind snake species endemic to South America. No subspecies are currently recognized.

Burrowing snake

Burrowing Snake may refer to:

Amerotyphlops brongersmianus, a harmless blind snake species found in South America.

Amerotyphlops trinitatus, a.k.a. the Trinidad burrowing snake, a harmless blind snake species found in Trinidad and Tobago.

Coffee worm snake

The coffee worm snake (Amerotyphlops tenuis) is a harmless blind snake species found in Mexico and Guatemala. No subspecies are currently recognized.

Costa Rica worm snake

The Costa Rica worm snake (Amerotyphlops costaricensis) is a species of snake in the Typhlopidae family.

Estado Falcón worm snake

The Estado Falcón worm snake (Amerotyphlops lehneri ) is a species of snake in the family Typhlopidae. The species is endemic to Venezuela.

Grenada worm snake

The Grenada worm snake or Grenada Bank blindsnake (Amerotyphlops tasymicris) is a species of blind snake that is endemic to Grenada, an island in the Caribbean Lesser Antilles.

It reaches a total length of 180 mm. It has light lines on its dorsal surface, and its ventral surface is unpigmented.

List of endangered reptiles

As of September 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 382 endangered reptile species. 7.4% of all evaluated reptile species are listed as endangered.

The IUCN also lists nine reptile subspecies as endangered.

Of the subpopulations of reptiles evaluated by the IUCN, one species subpopulation has been assessed as endangered.

For a species to be considered endangered by the IUCN it must meet certain quantitative criteria which are designed to classify taxa facing "a very high risk of exintction". An even higher risk is faced by critically endangered species, which meet the quantitative criteria for endangered species. Critically endangered reptiles are listed separately. There are 578 reptile species which are endangered or critically endangered.

Additionally 910 reptile species (18% of those evaluated) are listed as data deficient, meaning there is insufficient information for a full assessment of conservation status. As these species typically have small distributions and/or populations, they are intrinsically likely to be threatened, according to the IUCN. While the category of data deficient indicates that no assessment of extinction risk has been made for the taxa, the IUCN notes that it may be appropriate to give them "the same degree of attention as threatened taxa, at least until their status can be assessed."This is a complete list of endangered reptile species and subspecies evaluated by the IUCN. Species and subspecies which have endangered subpopulations (or stocks) are indicated.

List of least concern reptiles

As of September 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 2,900 least concern reptile species. 56% of all evaluated reptile species are listed as least concern.

The IUCN also lists two reptile subspecies as least concern.

Of the subpopulations of reptiles evaluated by the IUCN, six species subpopulations have been assessed as least concern.

This is a complete list of least concern reptile species and subspecies evaluated by the IUCN. Species and subspecies which have least concern subpopulations (or stocks) are indicated.

List of snakes of Trinidad and Tobago

Forty-seven species of snake have been recorded in Trinidad and Tobago, making the snake population of this area the most diverse in the Caribbean. Forty-four of these snake species are found in Trinidad and twenty-one in Tobago. Many of these species are South American, most of which are present in Venezuela. Trinidad and Tobago consists of two main islands, Trinidad and Tobago, and several smaller islands. The Bocas Islands, which lie between Trinidad and Venezuela, in the Bocas del Dragón (Dragon's Mouths), consist of Chacachacare, Monos, Huevos and Gaspar Grande. Several smaller islands lie off Trinidad, but snakes have been recorded on only one of them, Caledonia Island. Snakes have been recorded on one island off Tobago, Little Tobago. Four species are venomous: two coral snake species (Micrurus spp.), the fer-de-lance (Bothrops atrox) and the South American bushmaster (Lachesis muta). The common coral (Micrurus fulvius) is found on at least two of the Bocas Islands: Gaspar Grande and Monos. No venomous snakes inhabit Tobago.

List of vulnerable reptiles

As of September 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 411 vulnerable reptile species. 8.0% of all evaluated reptile species are listed as vulnerable.

The IUCN also lists ten reptile subspecies as vulnerable.

No subpopulations of reptiles have been evaluated as vulnerable by the IUCN.

For a species to be assessed as vulnerable to extinction the best available evidence must meet quantitative criteria set by the IUCN designed to reflect "a high risk of extinction in the wild". Endangered and critically endangered species also meet the quantitative criteria of vulnerable species, and are listed separately. See: List of endangered reptiles, List of critically endangered reptiles. Vulnerable, endangered and critically endangered species are collectively referred to as threatened species by the IUCN.

Additionally 910 reptile species (18% of those evaluated) are listed as data deficient, meaning there is insufficient information for a full assessment of conservation status. As these species typically have small distributions and/or populations, they are intrinsically likely to be threatened, according to the IUCN. While the category of data deficient indicates that no assessment of extinction risk has been made for the taxa, the IUCN notes that it may be appropriate to give them "the same degree of attention as threatened taxa, at least until their status can be assessed."This is a complete list of vulnerable reptile species and subspecies evaluated by the IUCN.

Pernambuco worm snake

The Pernambuco worm snake (Amerotyphlops paucisquamus) is a species of snake in the Typhlopidae family.

Reticulate worm snake

The reticulate worm snake (Amerotyphlops reticulatus) is a species of snake in the Typhlopidae family. The snake has been reported in Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, the Guyanas and Venezuela.

Trinidad worm snake

The Trinidad worm snake (Amerotyphlops trinitatus), also known commonly as the Trinidad burrowing snake, is a harmless blind snake species in the family Typhlopidae. The species is endemic to Trinidad and Tobago. There are no subspecies that are recognized as being valid.

Typhlopidae

The Typhlopidae are a family of blind snakes. They are found mostly in the tropical regions of Africa, Asia, the Americas, and all mainland Australia and various islands. The rostral scale overhangs the mouth to form a shovel-like burrowing structure. They live underground in burrows, and since they have no use for vision, their eyes are mostly vestigial. They have light-detecting black eye spots, and teeth occur in the upper jaw. The tail ends with a horn-like scale. Most of these species are oviparous. Currently, 18 genera are recognized containing over 200 species.

Typhlops

Typhlops is a genus of blind snakes in the family Typhlopidae. The genus is endemic to the West Indies. Some species which were formerly placed in the genus Typhlops have been moved to the genera Afrotyphlops, Amerotyphlops, Anilios, Antillotyphlops, Argyrophis, Cubatyphlops, Indotyphlops, Letheobia, Madatyphlops, Malayotyphlops, and Xerotyphlops.

Yonenga worm snake

The Yonenga worm snake (Amerotyphlops yonenagae) is a species of snake in the Typhlopidae family.

Yucatán worm snake

The Yucatán worm snake (Amerotyphlops microstomus) is a species of snake in the Typhlopidae family.

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