American Sportscasters Association

The American Sportscasters Association (ASA) was founded in 1979 by broadcaster Dick London and associate attorney Harold Foner as a non-profit association to represent sportscasters by promoting and supporting the needs and interests of the professional sports broadcaster.[1]

History

In 1980, Louis O. Schwartz was asked to revitalize the association by founders Dick London (award winning broadcast journalist) and (Attorney) Harold Foner and was named executive director. In 1983, a board of directors was established consisting of Jack Brickhouse, Don Dunphy, Dick Enberg, Curt Gowdy and Schwartz. Enberg was elected as chairman and Schwartz as president.

In 1974, Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn's office asked founder, Dick London, to form the Baseball Broadcasters Association of America. This was accomplished with the help of Joe Rickler and Monti Irvin from the Commissioner's Office. A few years later he formed the American Sportscasters Association, the umbrella organization for all sportscasters. After his retirement in 2000, Dick continued to perform on Radio and TV. Two years, co-hosted a Sunday pre-game sports show covering all NFL games on KDUS Radio, Phoenix ,the voice of the Arizona Cardinals; A weekly news and commentary and moderator of a panel show "Air It Out With The Bad Boys" until the spring of 2008. Dick is now off the mike writing books, "A Peaceful War" about his life experiences.

Dick "London" Hanna’s 46 year career as a Radio/TV Broadcast Journalist/Anchorman was one filled with outstanding accomplishment and contributions to society. In the military, he was the Public Relations representative for the President Eisenhower's Committee for Hungarian Refugee Relief. He received the First Army Award for humanitarian and outstanding service. He was a regular guest on NBC-Monitor, ABC-CBS-the BBC and Radio Free Europe. He also produced a military Christmas show with singer Steve Lawrence on WNDT-TV, NY City. Dick has Graduate Degrees in Broadcast Journalism and Media. After the military, he was the TV News Anchor for a CBS-TV affiliate in Pennsylvania. That was followed by news anchor positions on WWRL/WRFM-NY City where he soon became News and Sports Director before WRFM was sold to Bonneville. WWRL was the nation's number one R&B station. Under his leadership, his news team won several civic and national journalism awards including the prestigious Peabody. And in 1976, one of the world's top survey organization, The Lou Harris Company said Dick's leadership position in New York State makes his opinion particularly important to us. Other credits included his nightly half hour world news round-up on WNYW-NY City, the CBS international affiliate. News anchor on WNBC, NBC. Dick wrote many articles on social issues for religious organizations. The National Catholic Register, The American Baptist Educational Ministries and the National Council of Churches.

Halls of Fame

In 1984, Schwartz established the ASA Hall of Fame to honor those who have achieved excellence in the field of sports broadcasting.[2] Inductees include:

In 1987, the association established an International Hall of Fame. Its first inductee was Masao Hazama, one of Japan's first television sports broadcasters. Other inductees include BBC Sports boxing correspondent Harry Carpenter (1989) and Song Shixiong, sports commentator for China Central Television (CCTV) for over 30 years (1995).

Recognizing sportcasters and notable individuals

A "Sportscaster of the Year" award has also been given to top sportscasters, including Marv Albert, Chris Berman, Bob Costas, John Madden and Al Michaels.

The association has also recognized sports greats and other notable individuals who have influenced society and the world of sports, including Muhammad Ali, Arthur Ashe, Joe DiMaggio, Larry King, Henry Kissinger, LeRoy Neiman, and U.S. President Ronald Reagan

Events

It has had fourteen Hall of Fame dinners with over 500 attendees at each one.

Board of directors

As of 2016, its board of directors included Enberg, Jon Miller, Jim Nantz, Schwartz and Bill Walton.

See also

References

  1. ^ (2007) Sports Market Place Directory. Grey House Publishing. "Professional Organizations", p. 254.
  2. ^ 1997 Information Please Sports Almanac. "Hall of Fame & Awards", p. 490.

A Peaceful War by Dick London and Winston Hodge - https://www.amazon.com/Peaceful-War-Winston-Hodge-ebook/dp/B008Y5J4QE A Peaceful War (audio book) by Richard Hanna (Dick "Hanna" London) - https://itunes.apple.com/us/audiobook/a-peaceful-war-unabridged/id582862842

Dick London News Director for WWRL 1600 NY, NY - http://www.las-solanas.com/arsa/surveys_item.php?svid=2357

External links

Bill Stern

Bill Stern (July 1, 1907 – November 19, 1971) was a U.S. actor and sportscaster who announced the nation's first remote sports broadcast and the first telecast of a baseball game. In 1984, Stern was part of the American Sportscasters Association Hall of Fame's inaugural class which included sportscasting legends Red Barber, Don Dunphy, Ted Husing and Graham McNamee. He was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame (1988) and has a star in the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Bonnie Bernstein

Bonnie Lynn Bernstein (born August 16, 1970) is an American sports journalist and executive. She has been named one of the most accomplished female sportscasters in history by the American Sportscasters Association. Bernstein is Vice President, Content and Brand Development, of Campus Insiders, as well as the on-air "face" of the network. Additionally, she freelances for The Dan Patrick Show, ESPN, espnW and DirecTV and serves as a guest commentator on several news networks, including MSNBC, NBC and FOX News Channel.

Clem McCarthy

Clem McCarthy (September 9, 1882 – June 4, 1962) was an American sportscaster and public address announcer. He also lent his voice to Pathe News's RKO newsreels. He was known for his gravelly voice and dramatic style, a "whiskey tenor" as sports announcer and executive David J. Halberstam has called it.

Curt Gowdy

Curtis Edward Gowdy (July 31, 1919 – February 20, 2006) was an American sportscaster, well known as the longtime "voice" of the Boston Red Sox and for his coverage of many nationally televised sporting events, primarily for NBC Sports and ABC Sports in the 1960s and 1970s. His accomplishments include coining the nickname "The Granddaddy of Them All" for the Rose Bowl Game, taking the moniker from the Cheyenne Frontier Days in his native Wyoming.

Don Dunphy

Don Dunphy (July 5, 1908 – July 22, 1998) was an American television and radio sports announcer specializing in boxing broadcasts. Dunphy was noted for his fast-paced delivery and enthusiasm for the sport. It is estimated that he did "blow-by-blow" action for over 2,000 fights. The Friday Night Fights were broadcast every Friday evening from (radio and television (1939–1981) 9 P.M. to 10:45 P.M on ABC.

In 1984, Dunphy was part of the American Sportscasters Association Hall of Fame’s inaugural class which included sportscasting legends Red Barber, Ted Husing, Graham McNamee and Bill Stern. He was also a member of the organization's Board of Directors. He was elected in 1986 to the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association Hall of Fame.

Dunphy was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame in 1988 and had a memorable cameo appearance in the 1971 Woody Allen movie Bananas. He appears as the commentator in the 1977 biopic of Muhammad Ali, "The Greatest". He also called all of the fights in the 1980 United Artists film Raging Bull, which was directed by Martin Scorsese. In 1982, he won the Sam Taub Award for Excellence in Broadcasting Journalism in boxing. He is a member of the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

Dunphy was a star track athlete and went on to graduate from Manhattan College in 1930. In 1984, he was inducted into the Manhattan College Athletic Hall of Fame.His son, Don Dunphy Jr., was an executive producer of Eyewitness News on WABC-TV in New York City in its early years, and later became vice president of news services at ABC. He is buried in the Cemetery of the Holy Rood in Westbury, New York.

Ernie Harwell

William Earnest "Ernie" Harwell (January 25, 1918 – May 4, 2010) was an American sportscaster, known for his long career calling play-by-play of Major League Baseball games. For 55 seasons, 42 of them with the Detroit Tigers, Harwell called the action on radio and/or television. In January 2009, the American Sportscasters Association ranked Harwell 16th on its list of Top 50 Sportscasters of All Time.

Graham McNamee

Graham McNamee (July 10, 1888 – May 9, 1942) was an American radio broadcaster, the medium's most recognized national personality in its first international decade. He originated play-by-play sports broadcasting for which he was awarded the Ford C. Frick Award by the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2016.

Jack Brickhouse

John Beasley "Jack" Brickhouse (January 24, 1916 – August 6, 1998) was an American sportscaster. Known primarily for his play-by-play coverage of Chicago Cubs games on WGN-TV from 1948 to 1981, he received the Ford C. Frick Award from the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983. In 1985, Brickhouse was inducted into the American Sportscasters Association Hall of Fame along with the Voice of the Yankees Mel Allen and Red Sox Voice Curt Gowdy. Brickhouse served as the organization's Secretary/Treasurer and was a member of its board of directors.

Brickhouse also called Chicago White Sox games prior to that team leaving WGN in 1968. He covered national events from time to time, including three World Series for NBC television, although the Cubs never got there during his tenure. The voice on the audio track of the famous Willie Mays catch in Game 1 of the 1954 Series at the Polo Grounds belongs to Brickhouse, who was doing the Series along with the New York Giants' regular broadcaster, Russ Hodges. (Brickhouse himself had called Giants games locally in 1946.) Brickhouse called the 1959 Series, which featured the White Sox with Los Angeles Dodgers announcer Vin Scully, and the 1950 Series with Jim Britt. In addition, Brickhouse partnered with fellow baseball broadcaster Mel Allen for NBC's coverage of the 1952 Rose Bowl, and with Chris Schenkel for the network's coverage of two NFL Championship Games (1956 and 1963).

Brickhouse covered many other events, sports and otherwise (such as professional wrestling, for WGN and political conventions for the Mutual radio network). From 1953 to 1977 he was the voice of Chicago Bears football on WGN-AM radio, in an unlikely and entertaining pairing with the famous Chicago Sun-Times gossip columnist Irv Kupcinet. Brickhouse was a boxing commentator as well. Fights he worked include the 1949 fight between Jersey Joe Walcott and Ezzard Charles and the 1951 fight between Johnny Bratton and Charley Fusari. He did Chicago Bulls basketball games for WGN-TV from 1966 until 1973 as well.

Jack Buck

J.T. France "Jack" Buck (August 21, 1924 – June 18, 2002) was an American sportscaster, best known for his work announcing Major League Baseball games of the St. Louis Cardinals. His play-by-play work earned him recognition from numerous Halls of Fame, such as the National Baseball Hall of Fame, the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and the National Radio Hall of Fame. He has also been inducted as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame Museum.

Jack Whitaker

John Francis "Jack" Whitaker (born May 18, 1924) is an American sportscaster who worked for both CBS and ABC. He also is a decorated veteran of World War II, fighting in the Normandy Campaign and was wounded by an artillery strike.

Lesley Visser

Lesley Candace Visser (born September 11, 1953) is an American sportscaster, television and radio personality, and sportswriter. Visser is the first female NFL analyst on TV, and the only sportscaster in history (male or female) who has worked on Final Four, NBA Finals, World Series, Triple Crown, Monday Night Football, the Olympics, the Super Bowl, the World Figure Skating Championships and the U.S. Open network broadcasts. Visser, who was voted the No. 1 Female Sportscaster of all-time in a poll taken by the American Sportscasters Association, was elected to the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association's Hall of Fame in 2015.In 2009, Visser became the first woman to be an analyst for an NFL game on TV. She is currently a reporter for CBS Sports and News, writes for CBSSports.com and is also part of WFTL 640 Fox Sports' morning drive in South Florida, as well as one of the hosts of a CBS Sports Network weekly television show, We Need to Talk.

Visser was the first woman to be recognized by the Pro Football Hall of Fame as the 2006 recipient of the Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award which recognizes long-time exceptional contributions to radio and television in professional football. Pro Football Hall of Famer Troy Aikman said about Visser in his 2006 induction speech, "She brought respect and professionalism to the field of journalism for her work in print and broadcasting. It makes me proud to be in her company today."

A pioneer among women sports journalists, Visser re-joined CBS Sports in August 2000 after a six-year hiatus. She was formerly the sideline reporter for Monday Night Football among other assignments she had at ESPN and ABC Sports, such as the World Series, the Triple Crown and the World Figure Skating Championship. She serves as correspondent for the network's NFL and college basketball programming.

Lindsey Nelson

Lindsey Nelson (May 25, 1919 – June 10, 1995) was an American sportscaster best known for his long career calling play-by-play of college football and New York Mets baseball.

Nelson spent 17 years with the Mets and three years with the San Francisco Giants. For 33 years Nelson covered college football, including 26 Cotton Bowls, five Sugar Bowls, four Rose Bowls, and 14 years announcing syndicated Notre Dame games. He is in 13 separate Halls of Fame. Fans remember a talented broadcaster, an expert storyteller, and a true sports enthusiast. From his colorful jackets to his equally colorful broadcasts and enthusiastic manner of speaking, Nelson established himself as one of the industry's leading sportscasters.

Marv Albert

Marv Albert (born Marvin Philip Aufrichtig; June 12, 1941) is an American sportscaster. Honored for his work as a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame, he is commonly referred to as "the voice of basketball". From 1967 to 2004, he was also known as "the voice of the New York Knicks". Albert currently works for Turner Sports, serving as lead announcer for NBA games on TNT.

In addition to calling both professional and college basketball, he has experience announcing other sports such as American football, ice hockey, horse racing, boxing, and tennis. Albert has called the play-by-play of eight Super Bowls, NBA Finals, and seven Stanley Cup Finals. He has also called the Wimbledon Tennis Championships for TNT with Jim Courier and Mary Carillo. He also worked as a co-host and reporter for two World Series (1986 and 1988)

Marylou Whitney

Marie Louise "Marylou" Whitney (née Schroeder; born December 24, 1925) is a philanthropist and socialite. Whitney has many residences, first and foremost her "Cady Hill" estate in Saratoga Springs New York, a massive camp in the Adirondacks, a farm near Lexington, Kentucky, a winter home in Florida, an apartment in New York City and a residence in Alaska, the home state of her husband.

Mel Allen

Mel Allen (born Melvin Allen Israel; February 14, 1913 – June 16, 1996) was an American sportscaster, best known for his long tenure as the primary play-by-play announcer for the New York Yankees. During the peak of his career in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, Allen was arguably the most prominent member of his profession, his voice familiar to millions. Years after his death, he is still promoted as having been "The Voice of the Yankees." In his later years, he gained a second professional life as the first host of This Week in Baseball.

In perhaps the most notable moment of his distinguished career, Allen called Game 7 of the 1960 World Series, in which Bill Mazeroski hit a walk-off home run off Ralph Terry to win the fall classic for the Pittsburgh Pirates. This is the only walk-off home run ever to occur in a Game 7 of a World Series.

Pat Summerall

George Allen "Pat" Summerall (May 10, 1930 – April 16, 2013) was an American football player and television sportscaster, having worked at CBS, Fox, and ESPN. In addition to football, he also announced major golf and tennis events. In total, he announced 16 Super Bowls on network television (more than any other announcer), 26 Masters Tournaments, and 21 US Opens. He also contributed to 10 Super Bowl broadcasts on CBS Radio as a pregame host or analyst.

Summerall played football for the Arkansas Razorbacks and then in the National Football League (NFL) from 1952 through 1961. He was drafted by the Detroit Lions and played with Bobby Layne. The best playing time in his career was with the New York Giants as a kicker. After retiring as a player, he joined CBS as a color commentator the next year. He worked with Tom Brookshier and then John Madden on NFL telecasts for CBS and Fox. Although retired since 2002, he continued to announce games on occasion, especially those near his Texas home.

He was named the National Sportscaster of the Year by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association in 1977, and inducted into their Hall of Fame in 1994. That year, he also received the Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award from the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the American Sportscasters Association Hall of Fame in 1999. The "Pat Summerall Award" has been presented since 2006 during Super Bowl weekend at the NFL's headquarters hotel "to a deserving recipient who through their career has demonstrated the character, integrity and leadership both on and off the job that the name Pat Summerall represents."

Ray Scott (sportscaster)

Ray Scott (June 17, 1919 – March 23, 1998) was an American sportscaster, best known for his broadcasts for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League. His brother Hal Scott was also a sportscaster.

Ted Husing

Edward Britt "Ted" Husing (November 27, 1901 – August 10, 1962) was an American sportscaster and was among the first to lay the groundwork for the structure and pace of modern sports reporting on television and radio.

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