American League West

The American League West is one of three divisions in Major League Baseball's American League. The division has five teams as of the 2013 season, but had four teams from 1994 to 2012, and had as many as seven teams before the 1994 realignment. Although its teams currently only reside along the west coast and in Texas, historically the division has had teams as far east as Chicago. From 1998 (when the NL West expanded to five teams) to 2012, the AL West was the only MLB division with four teams. The current champion of this division is the Houston Astros. In 2013, the Houston Astros went from the National League Central to the AL West.[1] That move gives all six MLB divisions an equal five teams and both leagues an equal 15 teams each.

AL West
LeagueAmerican League
SportMajor League Baseball
Founded1969
Teams
No. of teams5
Championships
Most recent AL West champion(s)Houston Astros
(2nd title)
Most AL West titlesOakland Athletics (16)

Division membership

Current members

Former members

Division members

Place cursor over year for division champion or World Series team.
Years
AL West Division[A]
69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04
California Angels Anaheim Angels[F]
Oakland Athletics
Chicago White Sox[E]  
Kansas City Royals[E]  
Minnesota Twins[E]  
Seattle Pilots[B] Milwaukee Brewers[C]  
  Texas Rangers[C]
  Seattle Mariners[D]
AL West Division[A]
05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim[F] Los Angeles Angels[F]
Oakland Athletics
Texas Rangers
Seattle Mariners
  Houston Astros[G]
     Team not in division      Division Won World Series      Division Won AL Championship
A Creation of division due to 1969 expansion, Kansas City and Seattle added.
B Seattle franchise moved to Milwaukee, becoming the Brewers.
C Washington Senators moved to Dallas–Fort Worth, became Texas Rangers and switched divisions with Milwaukee, which moved to the AL East.
D Seattle added in the 1977 league expansion.
E Chicago, Kansas City, and Minnesota moved into the newly created AL Central due to the 1994 realignment.
F In 1997, California Angels become Anaheim Angels. In 2005, Anaheim Angels become Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. In 2016, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim become Los Angeles Angels.
G Houston switches leagues from the NL Central.

Champions by year

  • Team names link to the season in which each team played
AL West champions by year
Year Winner Record Win % Playoffs Notes
1969 Minnesota Twins (1) 97–65 .599 Lost ALCS to Baltimore, 3–0 First AL West Division Champions
1970 Minnesota Twins (2) 98–64 .605 Lost ALCS to Baltimore, 3–0
1971 Oakland Athletics (1) 101–61 .627 Lost ALCS to Baltimore, 3–0
1972 Oakland Athletics (2) 93–62 .600 Won World Series over Cincinnati, 4–3 First AL West team to win World Series
1973 Oakland Athletics (3) 94–68 .580 Won World Series over New York (NL), 4–3 First AL West team to win back to back World Series.
1974 Oakland Athletics (4) 90–72 .556 Won World Series over Los Angeles (NL), 4–1 First AL West team to win 3 World Series in a row.
1975 Oakland Athletics (5) 98–64 .605 Lost ALCS to Boston, 3–0
1976 Kansas City Royals (1) 90–72 .556 Lost ALCS to New York (AL), 3–2
1977 Kansas City Royals (2) 102–60 .630 Lost ALCS to New York (AL), 3–2
1978 Kansas City Royals (3) 92–70 .568 Lost ALCS to New York (AL), 3–1
1979 California Angels (1) 88–74 .543 Lost ALCS to Baltimore, 3–1
1980 Kansas City Royals (4) 97–65 .599 Lost World Series to Philadelphia, 4–2
1981 Oakland Athletics† (6) 64–45 .587 Lost ALCS to New York (AL), 3–0
1982 California Angels (2) 93–69 .574 Lost ALCS to Milwaukee, 3–2
1983 Chicago White Sox (1) 99–63 .611 Lost ALCS to Baltimore, 3–1
1984 Kansas City Royals (5) 84–78 .519 Lost ALCS to Detroit, 3–0
1985 Kansas City Royals (6) 91–71 .562 Won World Series over St. Louis, 4–3
1986 California Angels (3) 92–70 .568 Lost ALCS to Boston, 4–3
1987 Minnesota Twins (3) 85–77 .525 Won World Series over St. Louis, 4–3
1988 Oakland Athletics (7) 104–58 .642 Lost World Series to Los Angeles (NL), 4–1
1989 Oakland Athletics (8) 99–63 .611 Won World Series over San Francisco, 4–0
1990 Oakland Athletics (9) 103–59 .636 Lost World Series to Cincinnati, 4–0
1991 Minnesota Twins (4) 95–67 .586 Won World Series over Atlanta, 4–3
1992 Oakland Athletics (10) 96–66 .593 Lost ALCS to Toronto, 4–2
1993 Chicago White Sox (2) 94–68 .580 Lost ALCS to Toronto, 4–2
1994§ No playoffs due to 1994 Major League Baseball strike
1995 Seattle Mariners* (1) 79-66 .545 Lost ALCS to Cleveland, 4-2
1996 Texas Rangers (1) 90–72 .556 Lost ALDS to New York (AL), 3–1
1997 Seattle Mariners (2) 90–72 .556 Lost ALDS to Baltimore, 3–1
1998 Texas Rangers (2) 88–74 .543 Lost ALDS to New York (AL), 3–0
1999 Texas Rangers (3) 95–67 .586 Lost ALDS to New York (AL), 3–0
2000 Oakland Athletics (11) 91–70 .565 Lost ALDS to New York (AL), 3–2
2001 Seattle Mariners (3) 116–46 .716 Lost ALCS to New York (AL), 4–1
2002 Oakland Athletics (12) 103–59 .636 Lost ALDS to Minnesota, 3–2
2003 Oakland Athletics (13) 96–66 .593 Lost ALDS to Boston, 3–2
2004 Anaheim Angels (4) 92–70 .568 Lost ALDS to Boston, 3–0
2005 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (5) 95–67 .586 Lost ALCS to Chicago, 4–1
2006 Oakland Athletics (14) 93–69 .574 Lost ALCS to Detroit 4–0
2007 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (6) 94–68 .580 Lost ALDS to Boston, 3–0
2008 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (7) 100–62 .617 Lost ALDS to Boston, 3–1
2009 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (8) 97–65 .599 Lost ALCS to New York (AL), 4–2
2010 Texas Rangers (4) 90–72 .556 Lost World Series to San Francisco, 4–1
2011 Texas Rangers (5) 96–66 .593 Lost World Series to St. Louis, 4–3 First AL West team to lose back to back World Series.
2012 Oakland Athletics (15) 94–68 .580 Lost ALDS to Detroit, 3–2
2013 Oakland Athletics (16) 96–66 .593 Lost ALDS to Detroit, 3–2
2014 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (9) 98–64 .605 Lost ALDS to Kansas City, 3–0
2015 Texas Rangers (6) 88–74 .543 Lost ALDS to Toronto, 3–2
2016 Texas Rangers (7) 95–67 .586 Lost ALDS to Toronto, 3–0
2017 Houston Astros (1) 101–61 .623 Won World Series over Los Angeles (NL), 4–3 First AL West team to win World Series with their first AL West Championship
2018 Houston Astros (2) 103–59 .636 Lost ALCS to Boston, 4–1

† – Due to the players' strike, the season was split in two. The Athletics won the first half, and they defeated the second-half winner, the Kansas City Royals (50 – 53 overall record) in the postseason.
§ – Due to the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike, starting on August 12, no official winner was declared. The Texas Rangers were leading in winning percentage at time of the strike.
* – They defeated the California Angels in a one-game playoff for the division title, 9 – 1.

Wild-card winners produced

See List of American League Wild Card winners (since 1994)
Year Winner Record % GB Playoffs Notes
2000 Seattle Mariners 91–71 .562 .5 Lost ALCS to New York, 4–2
2001 Oakland Athletics 102–60 .630 14 Lost ALDS to New York, 3–2
2002 Anaheim Angels 99–63 .611 4 Won World Series over San Francisco, 4–3 First AL West team to Win World Series as a Wild Card
2012 Texas Rangers* 93–69 .574 1 Lost ALWC to Baltimore
2014 Oakland Athletics* 88–74 .543 10 Lost ALWC to Kansas City
2015 Houston Astros* 86–76 .531 2 Lost ALDS to Kansas City, 3–2
2018 Oakland Athletics* 97–65 .599 6 Lost ALWC to New York

* – Since the 2012 season, each league has had two Wild Card winners. The qualifiers play a single-game playoff to determine who will face the top-seeded team in the American League Division Series.

AL West statistics

Team Division
Championships
Last Year Won Year (s)
Current Teams in Division:
Oakland Athletics
16
2013
1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1981, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2012, 2013
Los Angeles Angels
9
2014
1979, 1982, 1986, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2014
Texas Rangers
7
2016
1996, 1998, 1999, 2010, 2011, 2015, 2016
Seattle Mariners
3
2001
1995, 1997, 2001
Houston Astros
2
2018
2017, 2018
Former Teams in Division:
Kansas City Royals
6
1985
1976, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1984, 1985
Minnesota Twins
4
1991
1969, 1970, 1987, 1991
Chicago White Sox
2
1993
1983, 1993
Seattle Pilots/Milwaukee Brewers 0

See also

References

  1. ^ "Houston Astros' sale approved by MLB". Associated Press. November 17, 2011. Retrieved November 17, 2011.

External links

1969 Minnesota Twins season

Led by new manager Billy Martin, the 1969 Minnesota Twins won the newly formed American League West with a 97–65 record, nine games over the second-place Oakland Athletics. The Twins were swept by the Baltimore Orioles in the first American League Championship Series.

1971 Oakland Athletics season

The 1971 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League West with a record of 101 wins and 60 losses. In their first postseason appearance of any kind since 1931, the A's were swept in three games by the Baltimore Orioles in the American League Championship Series.

1972 Oakland Athletics season

The 1972 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's winning the American League West with a record of 93 wins and 62 losses. In the playoffs, they defeated the Detroit Tigers in a five-game ALCS, followed by a seven-game World Series, in which they defeated the Cincinnati Reds for their first World Championship since 1930, when the club was in Philadelphia.

1973 Oakland Athletics season

The 1973 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's winning their third consecutive American League West title with a record of 94 wins and 68 losses. The A's went on to defeat the Baltimore Orioles in the ALCS for their second straight AL Championship, and won the World Series in seven games over the New York Mets to take their second consecutive World Championship.

1974 Oakland Athletics season

The 1974 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's winning their fourth consecutive American League West title with a record of 90 wins and 72 losses. In the playoffs, the A's defeated the Baltimore Orioles in the ALCS for their third straight AL pennant, and in the World Series, the first ever played entirely on the West Coast, defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in five games to take their third consecutive World Series championship. Paid attendance for the season was 845,693.In early 1974, owner Charlie Finley tried to sell the team with an asking price of $15 million.

1975 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1975 season involved the A's finishing first in the American League West with a record of 98 wins and 64 losses. They went on to play the Boston Red Sox in the 1975 American League Championship Series, losing in three straight games.

1976 Kansas City Royals season

The 1976 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing first in the American League West with a record of 90 wins and 72 losses. They lost in the 1976 American League Championship Series to the New York Yankees, three games to two.

1977 Kansas City Royals season

The 1977 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing first in the American League West with a record of 102 wins and 60 losses. They went on to lose the 1977 American League Championship Series to the New York Yankees, 3 games to 2.

1978 Kansas City Royals season

The 1978 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing first in the American League West with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses. The team went on to lose in the 1978 American League Championship Series to the New York Yankees, 3 games to 1.

1982 California Angels season

The California Angels 1982 season involved the Angels finishing 1st in the American League west with a record of 93 wins and 69 losses.

1984 Kansas City Royals season

The 1984 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 1st in the American League West with a record of 84 wins and 78 losses. However, they would lose to the Detroit Tigers in 3 Games in the ALCS. The Tigers would go on to the World Series and defeat the San Diego Padres in 5 Games.

1988 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1988 season involved the A's winning their first American League West title since 1981, with a record of 104 wins and 58 losses. In 1988, the elephant was restored as the symbol of the Athletics and currently adorns the left sleeve of home and road uniforms. The elephant was retired as team mascot in 1963 by then-owner Charles O. Finley in favor of a Missouri mule. The A's defeated the Boston Red Sox in the ALCS, but lost the World Series to the Los Angeles Dodgers in five games, including a dramatic, classic walk-off home run by the Dodgers' Kirk Gibson in game one.

1988 was the first of 3 straight years the A's would represent the AL in the World Series.

1990 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1990 season was their 23rd in Oakland, California. It was also the 90th season in franchise history. The team finished first in the American League West with a record of 103-59.

The Athletics' 1990 campaign ranks among the organization's finest. Oakland, in winning 103 games, led the league outright in wins for a third consecutive season; they remained the last major North American team to accomplish this until 2017, when the feat was matched by the nearby Golden State Warriors of the NBA. The Athletics benefited from stellar performances in all areas of the game. The team's offense was led by eventual Hall-of-Famer Rickey Henderson. Henderson finished the season with 65 stolen bases, 28 home runs, and a .325 batting average; for his efforts, he took home the 1990 American League MVP Award. The Athletics also benefited from strong performances by superstars Mark McGwire and Jose Canseco. The pair clubbed 39 and 37 home runs, respectively; in doing so, they drove in a combined total of 209 runs. Over the course of the season, the team added to an already strong offense; the additions of recent All-Stars Willie Randolph, Willie McGee, and Harold Baines further widened the gap between the Athletics and the rest of the league. Established veterans (such as Carney Lansford, Terry Steinbach, Dave Henderson, and Mike Gallego) and promising young players (mainly Walt Weiss and Mike Bordick) rounded out arguably the deepest roster in all of Major League Baseball. Eight of the Athletics' nine main postseason starters (R. Henderson, McGwire, Canseco, McGee, Steinbach, Randolph, Baines, and Lansford) played in at least one All-Star Game between 1988 and 1990.

The Athletics pitching staff, in many regards, had an even stronger campaign. The starting rotation was led by veteran Bob Welch. Welch would finish the season with both an MLB-leading 27 wins and a 2.95 ERA; this performance was strong enough to net the 1990 Cy Young Award. Welch, as of 2014, remains the last MLB pitcher to win at least 25 games in a season. Fellow starter Dave Stewart, winner of 22 games, finished in a tie (with Pittsburgh starter Doug Drabek) for the second-most wins in MLB. 1989 All-Star Mike Moore, 1991 All-Star Scott Sanderson, and longtime Athletic Curt Young rounded out the American League's top rotation. The Athletics' bullpen was led by superstar closer Dennis Eckersley, who posted a microscopic 0.61 ERA while recording 48 saves. As a team, the Athletics allowed only 570 runs (the fewest in the American League by a wide margin).

The Athletics easily won the American League West for a third consecutive season. They swept the Boston Red Sox, four games to none, in that year's American League Championship Series; in doing so, they won a third consecutive American League pennant. The Athletics entered the 1990 World Series as heavy favorites. Despite this, however, they were themselves swept by the Cincinnati Reds. The Athletics have not reached the World Series since.

1993 Chicago White Sox season

The 1993 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox' 94th season. They finished with a record of 94-68, good enough for first place in the American League West, which they won on September 17th, eight games ahead of the second-place Texas Rangers. However, they lost the American League Championship Series in six games to the eventual World Series champion Toronto Blue Jays. It would be the last year the Sox would compete in the American League West, as they would join the newly formed American League Central in 1994.

1995 American League West tie-breaker game

The 1995 American League West tie-breaker game was a one-game extension to Major League Baseball's (MLB) 1995 regular season; the California Angels and Seattle Mariners met to determine the winner of the American League's (AL) West Division. It was played at the Kingdome in Seattle, Washington, on the afternoon of Monday, October 2.The game was necessary after both finished the strike-shortened 144-game season with identical records of 78–66 (.542). Scoreless until the fifth inning, Seattle held a slim 1–0 lead at the seventh-inning stretch. The Mariners then broke it open and won 9–1 to secure the franchise's first postseason berth. It was counted as the 145th regular season game for both teams, with all the events in the game added to regular season statistics.

The game matched two highly unlikely teams: the Angels had not been to the postseason since 1986, and had not finished above third place in the AL West since. The Mariners had never been close to a pennant chase, with only two winning records (1991, 1993) in eighteen seasons.

With under two months left on August 3, the Angels were 56–33 (.629) with a comfortable lead in the AL West standings, eleven games ahead of Texas, and thirteen ahead of the third-place Mariners, at 43–46 (.483). By the end of the month, the Angels (67–50 (.573)) were on a six-game losing streak and their lead was trimmed to 7½ games over both. On September 21, the Angels lost their seventh-straight and the Mariners pulled even at 72–63 (.533), with Texas four games back. Five days later, Seattle had won its seventh straight and built three-game lead with five to go. then were shut out by the Angels. The M's won the first two games at Texas to clinch a tie with two remaining, but dropped the last two while California swept Oakland to finish on a five-game winning streak.At the time, the Angels' lead relinquishment was the third-largest in major league history, behind the 1978 Boston Red Sox and 1951 Brooklyn Dodgers.

After winning the tie-breaker, the Mariners met the New York Yankees (wild card) in the best-of-five AL Division Series. After two losses at Yankee Stadium, the second in fifteen innings, Seattle swept the next three games at home, capped by an 11th-inning double by Edgar Martínez in Game 5. The Mariners hosted and won the opener of the American League Championship Series, but lost to the Cleveland Indians in six games. The Angels did not return to the postseason until 2002, when they won their only World Series.

1999 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1999 season involved the Rangers finishing 1st in the American League west with a record of 95 wins and 67 losses. The 95-67 mark would be the best in franchise history until 2011.

Winning its third division title in four years, the Rangers would repeat its 1998 post-season performance, again losing to the New York Yankees 3-0. This would be the club's last post-season appearance until 2010.

2003 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 2003 season ended with the A's finishing 1st in the American League West with a record of 96 wins and 66 losses.

2004 Anaheim Angels season

The Anaheim Angels' 2004 season was the franchise's 44th since its inception. The regular season ended with a record of 92-70, resulting in the Angels winning their fourth American League West division title, their first since 1986. Their playoff run was short, as they were quickly swept by the Boston Red Sox in the American League Division Series.

The season was notable for being the last season the Angels played under the "Anaheim Angels" moniker; owner Arte Moreno changed the team name to the controversial "Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim" moniker the following season. It was also notable as the season in which newly signed outfielder Vladimir Guerrero won the AL Most Valuable Player award, the first time an Angels player had been so honored since Don Baylor in 1979.

American League

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the American League (AL), is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada. It developed from the Western League, a minor league based in the Great Lakes states, which eventually aspired to major league status. It is sometimes called the Junior Circuit because it claimed Major League status for the 1901 season, 25 years after the formation of the National League (the "Senior Circuit").

At the end of every season, the American League champion plays in the World Series against the National League champion; two seasons did not end in playing a World Series (1904, when the National League champion New York Giants refused to play their AL counterpart, and 1994, when a players' strike prevented the Series). Through 2018, American League teams have won 66 of the 114 World Series played since 1903, with 27 of those coming from the New York Yankees alone. The New York Yankees have won 40 American League titles, the most in the league's history, followed by the Philadelphia/Kansas City/Oakland Athletics (15) and the Boston Red Sox (14).

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