American Century Championship

The American Century Championship is a celebrity golf tournament in Nevada, United States. It is held during the second full week of July at Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course in Stateline, at the shore of Lake Tahoe. The course is at the southeast edge of the lake, at an average elevation exceeding 6,230 feet (1,900 m) above sea level.

American Century Championship
Tournament information
LocationStateline, Nevada, U.S.
Established1990, 29 years ago
Course(s)Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course
Par72
Length6,865 yards (6,277 m)[1]
Tour(s)Celebrity event
FormatModified Stableford - 54 holes
Prize fund$600,000
Month playedJuly
Current champion
Tony Romo
Stateline is located in the United States
Stateline
Stateline
Location in the United States
Stateline is located in Nevada
Stateline
Stateline
Location in Nevada

History

The American Century Championship tournament was developed to fill air time after NBC lost major league baseball airing rights. Initially, the tournament had no title sponsor, but landed three hall of fame players from different sports, John Elway, Michael Jordan and Mario Lemieux.[2] The first tournament was held 29 years ago in 1990 and sponsored by NBC,[3] which broadcasts the second and third-round coverage on the weekend. Isuzu sponsored the tournament from 1991 through 1998, succeeded by current sponsor American Century Investments in 1999.[4]

A 54-hole event, the first fourteen editions were conducted under standard stroke play; the modified Stableford format has been used since 2004.

The multiple winners of the event are Rick Rhoden (8), Dan Quinn (5), Billy Joe Tolliver (4), Mark Mulder (3), Jack Wagner (2), Tony Romo (2) and Mark Rypien (2). Actor Wagner is the only non-professional athlete to have won the event, and Mulder is the only one to win three consecutive.[5]

In July 2015, American Century Investments extended its sponsorship to 2022.[4]

Winners

References

  1. ^ "2013 Results". American Century Championship. July 21, 2013. Retrieved August 1, 2013.
  2. ^ Matz, Eddie (July 1, 2010). "The Mag: Golfing with celebs in Tahoe". ESPN.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Rypien dodges blitz, wins $75,000". Spokane Chronicle. (Washington). Associated Press. July 16, 1990. p. C3.
  4. ^ a b "American Century Investments Extends Golf Event Sponsorship". Sports Business Daily. American City Business Journals, Inc. July 21, 2015. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Mark Mulder wins celebrity golf title; Stephen Curry 4th". Washington Post. Associated Press. July 16, 2017. Retrieved July 16, 2017.

External links

Coordinates: 38°57′58″N 119°56′53″W / 38.966°N 119.948°W

Al Del Greco

Albert Louis "Al" Del Greco (born March 2, 1962) is a former American football placekicker and a current sports radio personality. After eight years as golf coach at Spain Park High School coach in Hoover, Alabama, Del Greco was named the head coach of the men's golf team at Samford University on May 2, 2014.

American Century Companies

American Century Companies is a privately controlled and independent investment management firm.

Billy Joe Tolliver

Billy Joe Tolliver (born February 7, 1966) is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) and Canadian Football League (CFL) for twelve seasons with the San Diego Chargers, Atlanta Falcons, Houston Oilers, Shreveport Pirates, Kansas City Chiefs, and New Orleans Saints. Over the course of his NFL career, he played in 79 games, completed 891 of 1,707 passes for 10,760 yards, threw 59 touchdowns and 64 interceptions, and retired with a passer rating of 67.7.

A graduate of Boyd High School and Texas Tech University, Tolliver was selected 51st in the 1989 NFL Draft by the San Diego Chargers. He started 19 games in two seasons at San Diego before being traded to Atlanta, where he saw playing time as a backup for three seasons. In 1994, he became one of three starting quarterbacks for Houston and then served as quarterback of the Shreveport Pirates in the CFL during their final season of activity in 1995. After not competing in 1996, Tolliver played for both Atlanta and Kansas City in 1997. He then started 11 games for New Orleans in two seasons but did not take the field in 2000. A stint with the Green Bay Packers in the 2001 offseason concluded his professional career.

Brett Hull

Brett Andrew Hull (born August 9, 1964) is a Canadian-American former ice hockey player and general manager, and currently an executive vice president of the St. Louis Blues of the National Hockey League (NHL). He played for the Calgary Flames, St. Louis Blues, Dallas Stars, Detroit Red Wings and Phoenix Coyotes between 1986 and 2005. His career total of 741 goals is the fourth highest in NHL history, and he is one of five players to score 50 goals in 50 games. He was a member of two Stanley Cup winning teams - 1999 with the Dallas Stars and 2002 with the Detroit Red Wings. In 2017 Hull was named one of the '100 Greatest NHL Players' in history.Known as one of the game's greatest snipers, Hull was an elite scorer at all levels of the game. He played college hockey for the University of Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs, where he scored 52 goals in 1985–86. He scored 50 the following year with the Moncton Golden Flames of the American Hockey League (AHL) and had five consecutive NHL seasons of at least 50 goals. His 86 goals in 1990–91 is the third highest single-season total in NHL history. Hull won the Hart Memorial Trophy and Lester B. Pearson Award that year as the league's most valuable player. He was named a first team all-star on three occasions and played in eight NHL All-Star Games.

Having dual citizenship in Canada and the United States, Hull was eligible to play for either Canada or the United States internationally and chose to join the American National Team. He was a member of the team that won the 1996 World Cup of Hockey and was a two-time Olympian, winning a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics. Hull was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2009, joining his father Bobby to become the first father-and-son pair of players in the Hall. They are the only pair to each score 1,000 career points in the NHL. Hull's nickname, "the Golden Brett" is a reference to his father's nickname of "the Golden Jet". His jersey number 16 was retired by the St. Louis Blues

Chris Chandler

Christopher Mark Chandler (born October 12, 1965) is a retired American football player who played as a quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for 17 seasons. He played for eight different teams during his NFL career, and is known for leading the Atlanta Falcons to a 14-2 season in 1998 followed by an appearance in Super Bowl XXXIII.

Dick Anderson

Richard Paul "Dick" Anderson (born February 10, 1946) is a former American college and professional football player who was a safety for the Miami Dolphins of the American Football League (AFL) and National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons during the 1960s and 1970s. He played college football for the University of Colorado, and was recognized as a consensus All-American. He was selected in third round of the 1968 AFL Draft, and he played for his entire professional career for the Dolphins.

Golf Channel on NBC

Golf Channel on NBC (known as PGA Tour on NBC from 1954 to 2011) is the branding used for broadcasts of golf tournaments produced by NBC Sports in conjunction with Golf Channel, on the NBC television network in the United States. The network's coverage focuses mostly on the PGA Tour (NBC shares the broadcast rights for weekend rounds with CBS Sports), but also includes major events not sanctioned by the tour, such as the Open Championship and Ryder Cup. NBC also airs some tournaments from other tours to which NBC Sports Group holds the television rights, notably the European Tour.

While originally using generic branding based on the event or tour (such as The PGA Tour on NBC), after NBC's parent company NBC Universal was acquired by Comcast – owner of Golf Channel (which serves as the current cable partner of the PGA Tour) – in February 2011, the channel's operations were merged directly into NBC Sports; subsequently, golf telecasts on NBC were rebranded under the Golf Channel on NBC banner.

John Smoltz

John Andrew Smoltz (born May 15, 1967), nicknamed "Smoltzie" and "Marmaduke," is an American former baseball pitcher who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball from 1988 to 2009, all but the last year with the Atlanta Braves. An eight-time All-Star, Smoltz was part of a celebrated trio of starting pitchers, along with Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine, who propelled Atlanta to perennial pennant contention in the 1990s, highlighted by a championship in the 1995 World Series. He won the National League (NL) Cy Young Award in 1996 after posting a record of 24–8, equaling the most victories by an NL pitcher since 1972. Though predominantly known as a starter, Smoltz was converted to a reliever in 2001 after his recovery from Tommy John surgery, and spent four years as the team's closer before returning to a starting role. In 2002, he set the NL record with 55 saves and became only the second pitcher in history (joining Dennis Eckersley) to record both a 20-win season and a 50-save season. He is the only pitcher in major league history to record both 200 wins and 150 saves.

Smoltz was one of the most prominent pitchers in playoff history, posting a record of 15–4 with a 2.67 earned run average (ERA) in 41 career postseason games, and was named the Most Valuable Player of the 1992 NL Championship Series; Andy Pettitte later broke his record for career postseason wins. Smoltz led the NL in wins, winning percentage, strikeouts and innings pitched twice each, and his NL total of 3,084 strikeouts ranked fifth in league history when he retired. He also holds the Braves franchise record for career strikeouts (3,011), and the record for the most career games pitched for the Braves (708) since the club's move to Atlanta in 1966; from 2004 to 2014, he held the franchise record for career saves. Smoltz left the Braves after 2008 and split his final season with the Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Cardinals. Since retiring as a player, he has served as a color commentator and analyst on television. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2015, his first year of eligibility.

Justin Timberlake

Justin Randall Timberlake (born January 31, 1981), often known by his initials, JT, is an American singer, songwriter, actor, dancer and record producer. Born and raised in Tennessee, he appeared on the television shows Star Search and The All-New Mickey Mouse Club as a child. In the late 1990s, Timberlake rose to prominence as one of the two lead vocalists and youngest member of NSYNC, which eventually became one of the best-selling boy bands of all time. Timberlake began to adopt a more mature image as an artist with the release of his debut solo album, the R&B-focused Justified (2002), which yielded the successful singles "Cry Me a River" and "Rock Your Body", and earned his first two Grammy Awards.

His critically acclaimed second album FutureSex/LoveSounds (2006), characterized by its diversity in music genres, debuted atop the U.S. Billboard 200 and produced the Hot 100 number-one singles "SexyBack", "My Love", and "What Goes Around... Comes Around". Established as a solo artist worldwide, his first two albums both exceeded sales of 10 million copies, and he continued producing records and collaborating with other artists. From 2008 through 2012, Timberlake focused on his acting career, effectively putting his music career on hiatus. He held starring roles in the films The Social Network, Bad Teacher, Friends with Benefits, and In Time.

Timberlake resumed his music career in 2013 with his third and fourth albums The 20/20 Experience and The 20/20 Experience – 2 of 2, exploring neo soul styles, partly inspired by the expansive song structures of 1960s and 1970s rock. The former became the best-selling album of the year in the US with the largest sales week, and spawned the top-three singles "Suit & Tie" and "Mirrors", while the latter produced the top-ten song "Not a Bad Thing". For his live performances, including the eponymous concert tour for the albums, he began performing with his band The Tennessee Kids, composed by instrumentalists and dancers. Timberlake voiced Branch in DreamWorks Animation's Trolls (2016), whose soundtrack includes his fifth Billboard Hot 100 chart-topping single, "Can't Stop the Feeling!". His fifth studio album Man of the Woods (2018) became his fourth number-one album in the US. The album was supported by the two top ten singles, "Filthy" and "Say Something". Man of the Woods concluded 2018 as the sixth best-selling album of the year.Throughout his solo career, Timberlake has sold over 32 million albums and 56 million singles globally, making him one of the world's best-selling music artists. Often cited as a pop icon, Timberlake is the recipient of numerous awards and accolades, including ten Grammy Awards, four Emmy Awards, three Brit Awards, and nine Billboard Music Awards. According to Billboard in 2017, he is the best performing male soloist in the history of the Mainstream Top 40. Time named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2007 and 2013. His other ventures include record label Tennman Records, fashion label William Rast, and the restaurants Destino and Southern Hospitality.

Mardy Fish

Mardy Simpson Fish (born December 9, 1981) is a former American professional tennis player. He was a hardcourt specialist. He is one of several American tennis players who rose to prominence in the early 2000s.

Fish won six tournaments on the main ATP Tour and reached the final of four Masters Series events: Cincinnati in 2003 and 2010, Indian Wells in 2008, and Montreal in 2011. His best results at Grand Slam tournaments are reaching the quarterfinals of the 2007 Australian Open, the 2008 US Open, and the 2011 Wimbledon Championships. At the 2004 Summer Olympic Games, Fish reached the final in the men's singles, losing to Nicolás Massú.

In April 2011, Fish overtook compatriot Andy Roddick to become the American No. 1 in the ATP rankings, reaching a career-high singles ranking of world No. 7 in August 2011. He then played in the year-end tournament for the only time in his career.

He retired after the 2015 US Open. Since January 2019 Fish is captain of Davis Cup team, replacing Jim Courier.

Mario Lemieux

Mario Lemieux, (; French: [ləmjø]; born October 5, 1965) is a Canadian former professional ice hockey player. He played parts of 17 National Hockey League seasons with the Pittsburgh Penguins from 1984 to 2006, assuming ownership in 1999. Nicknamed "The Magnificent One" or Le Magnifique (as well as "Super Mario"), he is widely acknowledged to have been one of the greatest players of all time. A gifted playmaker and fast skater despite his large size, Lemieux often beat defencemen with fakes and dekes.Lemieux led Pittsburgh to consecutive Stanley Cup championships in 1991 and 1992. Under his ownership, the Penguins won additional titles in 2009, 2016, and 2017. He is the only man to have his name on the Cup as both a player and an owner. He also led Team Canada to an Olympic gold medal in 2002, a championship at the 2004 World Cup of Hockey, and a Canada Cup in 1987. He won the Lester B. Pearson Award as the most outstanding player voted by the players four times, the Hart Trophy as the NHL's most valuable player (MVP) during the regular season three times, the Art Ross Trophy as the league's points leader six times, and the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoffs MVP in 1991 and 1992. He is the only player to score one goal in each of the five possible situations in a single NHL game, a feat he accomplished in 1988. At the time of his retirement, he was the NHL's seventh-highest ranked career scorer with 690 goals and 1,033 assists. He ranks second in NHL history with a 0.754 goals-per game average for his career, behind only Mike Bossy (0.762). In 2004, he was inducted into Canada's Walk of Fame.

Lemieux's career was plagued by health problems that limited him to 915 of a possible 1,428 regular season games, between the opening of the 1984–85 campaign and the final game of 2005–2006. Lemieux's NHL debut was on October 11, 1984, and his final game took place on December 16, 2005. His numerous ailments included spinal disc herniation, Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic tendinitis of a hip-flexor muscle, and chronic back pain so severe that other people had to tie his skates. He retired on two separate occasions due to these health issues, first in 1997 after battling lymphoma before returning in 2000, and then a second and final time in 2006 after being diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. Lemieux also missed the entire 1994–95 season due to Hodgkin's lymphoma. Despite his lengthy absences from the game, his play remained at a high level upon his return to the ice; he won the Hart Trophy and scoring title in 1995–96 after sitting out the entire previous season, and he was a finalist for the Hart when he made his comeback in 2000. In 1999, he bought the then-bankrupt Penguins and their top minor-league affiliate, the American Hockey League's (AHL) Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins, and is currently the team's principal owner and chairman.

The Hockey Hall of Fame inducted Lemieux immediately after his first retirement in 1997, waiving the normal three-year waiting period; upon his return in 2000, he became the third Hall of Famer (after Gordie Howe and Guy Lafleur) to play after being inducted. Lemieux's impact on the NHL has been significant: Andrew Conte of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review called him the saviour of the Pittsburgh Penguins, and after Lemieux's retirement, Wayne Gretzky commented that "You don't replace players like Mario Lemieux ... The game will miss him." Bobby Orr called him "the most talented player I've ever seen." Orr, along with Bryan Trottier and numerous fans, speculated that if Lemieux had not suffered so many issues with his health, his on-ice achievements would have been much greater. In 2017, he was named one of the "100 Greatest NHL Players".

Mark Mulder

Mark Alan Mulder (born August 5, 1977) is a former American professional baseball player. A left-handed starting pitcher, Mulder pitched in Major League Baseball for the Oakland Athletics and St. Louis Cardinals. He is a two-time All-Star.

Mark Rypien

Mark Robert Rypien (born October 2, 1962) is a former professional football quarterback. He was drafted by the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL) in the 6th round of the 1986 NFL draft. He is the first Canadian-born quarterback to start in the NFL and win the Super Bowl MVP award, doing so in Super Bowl XXVI.

MontBleu

MontBleu Resort Casino & Spa (formerly the Park Tahoe and Caesars Tahoe) is a hotel and casino located in Stateline, Nevada. It is owned and operated by Eldorado Resorts. The property includes a 48,456 sq ft (4,501.7 m2) casino and a 438-room hotel on a 21-acre (8.5 ha) site. It is the home to the Ciera Steak + Chophouse. The entire property underwent a $25-million remodel in 2015, with all guest rooms, the casino, 1,200-seat showroom, and exterior being upgraded.

NBC Sports Real Golf

NBC Sports Real Golf is a mobile game developed by Lucky Chicken Games, a division of the game's publisher, Abandon Mobile. With a license from NBC Sports, this golf features photorealistic graphics, variable course conditions, and multiple club selections.

Ray Romano

Raymond Albert Romano (born December 21, 1957) is an American stand-up comedian, actor and screenwriter. He is best known for his role on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond, for which he received an Emmy Award, and as the voice of Manny in the Ice Age film series. He created and starred in the TNT comedy-drama Men of a Certain Age (2009–11). From 2012 to 2015, Romano had a recurring role as Hank Rizzoli, a love interest of Sarah Braverman in Parenthood, and co-starred in the romantic comedy The Big Sick (2017). Romano portrays as Rick Moreweather in the comedy-drama series Get Shorty.

Rick Rhoden

Richard Alan Rhoden (born May 16, 1953) is a professional golfer and was a Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. During his 16-year baseball career, he played for National League teams the Los Angeles Dodgers (1974–1978), the Pittsburgh Pirates (1979–1986), and the Houston Astros (1989), and he ended his career with the New York Yankees (1987–1988) of the American League.

Stableford

Stableford is a scoring system used in the sport of golf. Rather than counting the total number of strokes taken, as in stroke play, it involves scoring points based on the number of strokes taken at each hole. Unlike traditional scoring methods, where the aim is to have the lowest score, under Stableford rules, the objective is to have the highest score.

The Stableford system was developed by Dr. Frank Barney Gorton Stableford (1870–1959), to deter golfers from giving up on their round after just one or two bad holes. It was first used informally at the Glamorganshire Golf Club, Penarth, Wales, in 1898, and first used in competition at Wallasey Golf Club in Wallasey, England, in 1932. Between his membership of the Glamorganshire and Wallasey Golf Clubs, Stableford was a member at Anglesey Golf Club North Wales, for most of the 1920s.Stableford can have the added benefit of speeding up the pace of play, as once it is no longer possible to score a point, players do not have to complete the hole but can simply pick up their ball and proceed to the next hole. It is a popular form of the game, especially at club level and particularly in the United Kingdom, as it is still possible to record a competitive score despite having the occasional bad hole.

Tony Romo

Antonio Ramiro Romo (born April 21, 1980) is an American football television analyst and retired quarterback who played 14 seasons with the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Eastern Illinois University, where he won the Walter Payton Award in 2002, and led the Panthers to an Ohio Valley Conference championship in 2001.

He signed as an undrafted free agent with the Cowboys in 2003. Beginning his career as a holder, Romo became the Cowboys' starting quarterback during the 2006 season. Serving as the team's primary starter from 2006 to 2015, he guided the Cowboys to four postseason appearances and was named to the Pro Bowl four times. Romo retired after the 2016 season, following a preseason back injury that caused him to lose his starting position to Dak Prescott. Upon retiring, he was hired by CBS Sports to become the lead color analyst for their NFL telecasts, teaming with Jim Nantz in the broadcast booth.

Romo holds several Cowboys team records, including passing touchdowns, passing yards, most games with at least 300 passing yards, and games with three or more touchdown passes. He also held a higher passer rating in the fourth quarter than any other NFL quarterback from 2006 to 2013. However, Romo's reputation was affected by a lack of postseason success, having won only two of the six playoff games he appeared in and never advancing beyond the divisional round. His 97.1 passer rating is the fourth highest of all time and the highest among quarterbacks not to reach the Super Bowl, as well as the highest among retired players.

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