America (magazine)

America is a national weekly magazine published by the Jesuits of the United States and headquartered in midtown Manhattan. It contains news and opinion about Catholicism and how it relates to American politics and cultural life. It has been published continuously since 1909, and is also available online. With its Jesuit affiliation, America has been considered a liberal-leaning publication,[1][2][3] and has been described by The Washington Post as "a favourite of Catholic liberal intellectuals".[3]

America
America (Jesuit magazine)
EditorMatt Malone
Former editors
CategoriesRoman Catholicism
FrequencyWeekly
Circulation45,000
PublisherAmerican Jesuits
Year founded 1909
CompanyAmerica Press Inc. (Society of Jesus)
CountryUnited States
Based inNew York City
LanguageEnglish
Websitewww.americamagazine.org
ISSN0002-7049

History

The publication was founded in 1909 in New York City by the Jesuits of the United States, who, as of 2018, still maintain and publish the weekly magazine.

Under the leadership of its former editor in chief Thomas J. Reese from 1998 to 2005, the magazine became known for publishing articles and opinion pieces taking positions contrary to official Catholic teaching on matters such as homosexuality, priestly celibacy, birth control, and the abortion debate. The magazine came under the scrutiny of the Holy See, and the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith had allegedly proposed a committee of censors to review the magazine’s content. Reese resigned in May 2005. The National Catholic Reporter claimed that Reese's resignation was forced by the Vatican,[4] although America and the Society of Jesus in Rome denied this.[5]

In 2009, under the leadership of Drew Christiansen, the editorial board gave support to an invitation for U.S. President Barack Obama to receive an honorary degree at the University of Notre Dame, which had become controversial after directives from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops discouraged Catholic Universities form honoring pro-choice politicians and activists .[6]

On October 1, 2012, Matt Malone became the 14th editor-in-chief. He was the youngest editor-in-chief in the magazine's history. In September 2013, the magazine published an interview with Pope Francis, conducted by fellow Jesuit Antonio Spadaro. In the spring of 2014, Malone announced that America would open its first Rome bureau and that Gerard O'Connell would be its Vatican correspondent.

On February 28, 2017, America launched a podcast, Jesuitical, targeted at young Catholics.[7]

References

  1. ^ Thompson, Damian (May 9, 2018). "Caught in the culture wars | CatholicHerald.co.uk". CatholicHerald.co.uk. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  2. ^ "American Historical Periodicals: Periodicals Online". Penn Libraries. University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved 19 October 2018.
  3. ^ a b Boorstein, Michelle (28 June 2013). "America, a popular intellectual Catholic magazine, bans terms 'liberal,' 'conservative'". The Washington Post. Retrieved 17 July 2015.
  4. ^ Tom Roberts and John L. Allen, Jr., "Editor of Jesuits' America magazine forced to resign under Vatican pressure;, National Catholic Reporter, May 6, 2005]
  5. ^ "Signs of the Times". America. May 23, 2005. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  6. ^ "Inside the Obama-Notre Dame Debate". The Nation. May 14, 2009. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  7. ^ "Welcome to jesuitical". 2017-02-28. Retrieved 2018-05-12.

External links

1940s in comics

See also:

1930s in comics,

1950s in comics and the

list of years in comics

Publications: 1940 - 1941 - 1942 - 1943 - 1944 - 1945 - 1946 - 1947 - 1948 - 1949

1993 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. In 1950, the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) selected its first All-American baseball team. It has since chosen All-American teams and a player of the year for each division (National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, Division II, Division III, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, junior college and high school). Collegiate Baseball selects All-American, Freshman All-American and High School All-American teams. Baseball America magazine selects pre-season and post-season All-American teams and College Player of the Year honorees.Various organizations selected All-American lists of the best players for the 1993 NCAA Division I college baseball season. The ABCA, the magazine Baseball America, and Collegiate Baseball were the NCAA-sanctioned selectors. This list only includes players selected to the post-season All-American first team for each selector. However, many All-American selections choose second, third, etc. teams from the remaining eligible candidates.

1994 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. In 1950, the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) selected its first All-American baseball team. It has since chosen All-American teams and a player of the year for each division (National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, Division II, Division III, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, junior college, and high school). Collegiate Baseball selects All-American, Freshman All-American, and High School All-American teams. Baseball America magazine selects pre-season and post-season All-American teams and College Player of the Year honorees.Various organizations selected All-American lists of the best players for the 1994 NCAA Division I college baseball season. The ABCA, the magazine Baseball America, and Collegiate Baseball were the NCAA-sanctioned selectors. This list only includes players selected to the post-season All-American first team for each selector. However, many All-American selections choose second, third, etc. teams from the remaining eligible candidates.

American Youth Soccer Organization

The American Youth Soccer Organization (AYSO) is one of the two main national organizations in youth soccer in the United States for children aged 4 through 19.

Over 50 years ago, AYSO was established as a non-profit soccer organization in Torrance (a suburb of Los Angeles, California) at Jefferson Elementary School in 1964 with nine teams. Today the organization claims membership of over 50,000 teams, with over 630,000 participants.AYSO is Headquartered in Torrance, California and has developed local programs known as "Regions" in all 50 states, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Trinidad and Tobago. The organization is run primarily by volunteers at its constituent local levels, with approximately 60 paid employees at its national headquarters.

Notable players who started their careers in AYSO programs include Landon Donovan, Carlos Bocanegra, Julie Foudy, Eric Wynalda, Shannon Boxx, Brian Ching, Alex Morgan, Kristen Graczyk, Natasha Kai, and Amy Rodriguez.

Andy Atuegbu

Andy Atuegbu (ah-two-ay-boo) is a retired Nigerian soccer midfielder. Atuegbu was a star midfielder for the University of San Francisco from 1974 to 1977. The Dons won the NCAA championship two of Atuegbu's four seasons with the team, 1975 and 1976. His outstanding play led to his selection as a first team All American in 1976. He also earned second team All American recognition in 1975 and 1977. His 1976 NCAA championship with the Dons was complemented with a National Challenge Cup title while playing for SFAC. He scored the winning goal in the final against Inter-Giuliana.

The Oakland Stompers of the North American Soccer League (NASL) drafted Atuegbu in 1978 and he spent that season with the Stompers. The team folded at the end of the 1978 season and Atuegbu moved to the Edmonton Drillers for the 1979 NASL season. In the fall of 1979, he signed with the Hartford Hellions of the Major Indoor Soccer League. After one season, he moved to the San Francisco Fog where he played the 1980-1981 season. He later played for the amateur Greek-American A.C. when it won the 1985 U.S. Open Cup.

Soccer America Magazine named Atuegbu to their College Team of the Century.

While retired from professional soccer, Atuegbu continues to play for fun.

Bruce Murray (soccer)

Bruce Edward Murray (born January 25, 1966) is a retired American soccer forward/Mid fielder, who at the time of his retirement was the all-time leading scorer for the U.S. National Team. His standout college career led to his selection by Soccer America Magazine to its College Team of the Century. He then played professionally in both Europe and the United States, including the American Soccer League and American Professional Soccer League. Concussion syndrome forced him to retire in 1995, Murray had earned 86 caps, scoring 21 goals, including one at the 1990 FIFA World Cup. He was also a member of the U.S. national futsal team which placed third at the 1989 FIFA Futsal World Championship. He currently coaches at the Center for Soccer Excellence at The St. James in Springfield, Virginia. He is a member of the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

Christine Kinealy

Christine Kinealy is an English-born historian, author, and founding director of Ireland's Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University. She is an authority on Irish history.Kinealy has lived in the United States since 2007. She was named "one of the most influential Irish Americans" in 2011 by Irish America magazine.

Daniel Coughlin

Fr. Daniel P. Coughlin, STL, (born November 8, 1934) served as the 59th Chaplain of the United States House of Representatives from March 23, 2000, to April 14, 2011. He was the first Roman Catholic priest to serve in that position, and the process that led to his selection included some controversy. However, as a Washington Post article pointed out in 2010, on the occasion of Coughlin's tenth anniversary in the House Chaplain position, "there is ample evidence that the rancor that accompanied his selection has disappeared: Last week, lawmakers from both parties streamed onto the House floor to honor his decade of service."

Daniel J. Harrington

Daniel J. Harrington, S.J. (July 19, 1940 – February 7, 2014), was Professor of New Testament and Chair of the Biblical Studies Department at Boston College School of Theology and Ministry (formerly Weston Jesuit School of Theology).

A member of the Society of Jesus, Fr. Harrington served as editor of New Testament Abstracts from 1972 until his death. He also edited the eighteen-volume Sacra Pagina series of New Testament commentaries for Liturgical Press and wrote "The Word" column for America magazine for three years. He was a teacher as well as a theologian and his areas of study included the interpretation of the Bible in antiquity and today, Second Temple Judaism, the Dead Sea Scrolls, biblical theology, biblical languages, the Synoptic Gospel, Pauline theology, and the book of Revelation.He was a pastoral associate at St. Agnes in Arlington, Massachusetts, and at St. Peter's in Cambridge, Massachusetts. America magazine called him "one of the world's leading New Testament scholars".Harrington died of cancer in the New England Jesuit Infirmary in Weston, Massachusetts.

Donald Rosenberg

Donald Rosenberg is an American musician, music critic and journalist.

Rosenberg was born in New York City and educated at the Mannes College of Music and the Yale School of Music. He is a horn player, who participated in the Aspen Music Festival and Marlboro Music Festival.Rosenberg wrote for the Akron Beacon Journal from 1977–89, then for The Pittsburgh Press (1989–92) and Cleveland's The Plain Dealer from 1992. The Cleveland Orchestra Story (ISBN 1-886228-24-8), his 700-page book on the history of the Cleveland Orchestra, was published in 2000. He was removed from his position as principal classical music critic of The Plain Dealer in 2008, reportedly for his criticism of Franz Welser-Möst, the music director of the Cleveland Orchestra. Rosenberg was laid off from The Plain Dealer in 2013.Rosenberg served four terms as president of the Music Critics Association of North America. In March 2014, he was named editor of EMAg (Early Music America Magazine). He was a visiting teacher at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music from 2011-18.

Irish America (magazine)

Irish America is a bi-monthly periodical that aims to cover topics relevant to the Irish in North America including a range of political, economic, social, and cultural themes. The magazine’s inaugural issue was published in October 1985. Irish America focuses on political and business leaders, organizations, artists, writers and community figures among the Irish in America through its annual lists, awards, and events including the Wall Street 50, Business 100, and Stars of the South.

Irish America's primary goals are to emphasize the achievements of Irish Americans in each bi-monthly issue, such as former U.S. president Bill Clinton, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former president of Coca-Cola and chairman of Allen & Company Donald R. Keough, comedian Kathy Griffin, film actress Maureen O'Hara, political commentators Chris Matthews and Bill O'Reilly, and California governor Jerry Brown.

Irish America Hall of Fame

The Irish America Hall of Fame was founded by Irish America magazine in November 2010. It recognizes extraordinary figures in the Irish American community who have had a profound effect on the Irish in America and strengthened the bonds between the United States and Ireland.

The Irish America Hall of Fame is the centerpiece of the Dunbrody (2001) Famine Ship's new Emigration History Visitor Center in New Ross, Co. Wexford. It was developed in collaboration with publishers Niall O'Dowd and Patricia Harty of Irish America Magazine. The exhibition celebrates the lives, works, and achievements of noted Irish individuals such as: President John F. Kennedy and the Kennedys, Henry Ford, Donald Keough, and President Clinton.

James Martin (priest, born 1960)

James J. Martin (born December 29, 1960), also known as Jim Martin, is an American Jesuit priest, a writer, and editor-at-large of the Jesuit magazine America. In 2017, Pope Francis appointed Martin as a consultant to the Vatican's Secretariat for Communications. Some of Martin's theological views, especially on homosexuality, are controversial in the Catholic Church.

Loyola Jesuit College

Loyola Jesuit College is a private, co-educational, boarding, 6-year secondary school in Abuja, operated by the Society of Jesus of the Roman Catholic church. The school was opened on October 2, 1996, and is named after the Society's founder, St. Ignatius of Loyola. The school has consistently ranked at the top of Nigerian schools in the WAEC exams.

Opus Dei

Opus Dei, formally known as the Prelature of the Holy Cross and Opus Dei (Latin: Praelatura Sanctae Crucis et Operis Dei), is an institution of the Catholic Church which teaches that everyone is called to holiness and that ordinary life is a path to sanctity. The majority of its membership are lay people; the remainder are secular priests under the governance of a prelate elected by specific members and appointed by the Pope. Opus Dei is Latin for "Work of God"; hence the organization is often referred to by members and supporters as the Work.Opus Dei was founded in Spain in 1928 by Catholic saint and priest Josemaría Escrivá and was given final Catholic Church approval in 1950 by Pope Pius XII. St. John Paul II made it a personal prelature in 1982 by the apostolic constitution Ut sit; that is, the jurisdiction of its own bishop covers the persons in Opus Dei wherever they are, rather than geographical dioceses.As of 2016, there were 94,776 members of the Prelature: 92,667 lay persons and 2,109 priests. These figures do not include the diocesan priest members of Opus Dei's Priestly Society of the Holy Cross, estimated to number 2,000 in the year 2005. Members are in more than 90 countries. About 70% of Opus Dei members live in their private homes, leading traditional Catholic family lives with secular careers, while the other 30% are celibate, of whom the majority live in Opus Dei centers. Aside from their personal charity and social work, Opus Dei members organize training in Catholic spirituality applied to daily life; members are involved in running universities, university residences, schools, publishing houses, hospitals, and technical and agricultural training centers.

Patsy Walker

Hellcat (Patricia "Patsy" Walker) is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. She premiered as the star of a teen romantic-comedy series and was later integrated into Marvel superhero franchises such as the Avengers and the Defenders.

Created by Stuart Little and Ruth Atkinson, Patsy Walker first appeared in Miss America Magazine #2 (Nov. 1944), published by Marvel precursor Timely Comics, and became Hellcat in The Avengers #144 (Feb. 1976).

In the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a version of the character is portrayed by Rachael Taylor in Jessica Jones as a main character and in The Defenders as a recurring character.

Regis High School (New York City)

Regis High School is a private Jesuit university-preparatory school for Roman Catholic young men located on Manhattan's Upper East Side. Annual class enrollment is limited to approximately 135 male students from the New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut tri-state area. The school is ranked as both the best Catholic high school in the United States and the best all-boys school in New York. Regis is also consistently ranked in the top five high schools in the nation in regard to SAT/ACT scores.

Soccer America

Soccer America is a quarterly American magazine devoted to soccer. The magazine is headquartered in Oakland, California, USA.

Soccer America Player of the Year Award

Beginning in 1984, Soccer America Magazine began naming a college player of the year. At the time Soccer America was the best source for U.S. soccer, especially collegiate soccer which was rarely covered by the national news services. Consequently, its end of year awards have been recognized as among the most important and are listed by the NCAA in its official awards.

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