Amari Cooper

Amari Cooper (born June 17, 1994) is an American football wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Alabama where he was the Biletnikoff Award winner as the nation's top receiver and a unanimous All-American in 2014. Widely considered the top wide receiver prospect of the 2015 NFL Draft, he was selected with the fourth overall pick by the Oakland Raiders.

Amari Cooper
refer to caption
Cooper with the Oakland Raiders in 2015
No. 19 – Dallas Cowboys
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:June 17, 1994 (age 24)
Miami, Florida
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school:Miami Northwestern
(Miami, Florida)
College:Alabama
NFL Draft:2015 / Round: 1 / Pick: 4
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 2018
Receptions:278
Receiving yards:3,908
Receiving average:14.1
Receiving touchdowns:26
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Cooper attended Miami Northwestern Senior High School in Miami, Florida.[1] As a junior, he missed much of the season with an injury but still managed to be one of quarterback Teddy Bridgewater's primary targets and had 16 catches for 175 yards with four scores. Cooper was dominant on the 7-on-7 circuit at various college campuses before his senior season. He had a show out performance at Alabama's summer camp,[2] and that quickly led to an offer from Nick Saban and the Crimson Tide. In his final year, he hauled in 33 receptions for 722 yards and 6 touchdowns. He was a first team FHSAA 8A All-State selection, as well as the No. 4 player on The Orlando Sentinel’s Florida Top 100.[3] He was also invited to play at the 2012 Under Armour All-America Game, where he had a 75-yard touchdown grab and a 93-yard punt return for a score. In addition to being a standout in football, Cooper also starred in basketball and track at Miami Northwestern.[4]

Cooper was a consensus four-star prospect. He was listed as the No. 45 in the Rivals100, and was considered the No. 6 wide receiver and No. 8 player in Florida by Rivals.com.[5] ESPNU listed him as the nation's No. 7 wideout and No. 46 overall prospect in the ESPNU 150 while ranking 25th in the ESPNU Southeast Top 100 and No. 12 in Florida.[6] He was ranked as the No. 6 wide receiver and the No. 10 player in the state of Florida by 247Sports.com, while ranking him 55th in the Top247.[7] Also, Scout.com rated him as the No. 12 pass catcher in the nation and 86th overall prospect.[8] He chose Alabama over Florida State, Miami, and Ohio State, among others. Cooper announced his verbal commitment to the University of Alabama on September 22, 2011.[9]

College career

Freshman season

As a freshman at Alabama, Cooper played in all 14 games, including starts in the final nine games. He led the team with 59 receptions for 1,000 yards and 11 touchdowns.[10][11] The 11 touchdowns broke Alabama's 62-year-old record by Al Lary.[12] His receptions and receiving yards broke Julio Jones's Alabama freshman records. In the SEC Championship, he had eight receptions for 128 yards and a touchdown in the 32–28 victory over Georgia.[13] In Alabama's 2013 BCS National Championship Game 42–14 victory over Notre Dame, Cooper led all Alabama receivers with 105 yards and two touchdowns.[14][15] Cooper earned consensus Freshman All-American honors and was selected to the SEC All-Freshman team by the league coaches.[16]

Sophomore season

As a sophomore in 2013, Cooper played in 12 games with seven starts, missing two games due to injury. He had 45 receptions for a team-high 736 yards and four touchdowns.[17] He had his best game of the season against Auburn in the Iron Bowl, recording six receptions for 178 yards, including a school record 99-yard touchdown reception from quarterback AJ McCarron.[18] In the Sugar Bowl against Oklahoma, he had nine receptions for 121 yards in the 45–31 loss.[19]

Junior season

As a junior in 2014, Cooper set numerous single-season and career records for Alabama.[20] Against Tennessee, he broke Alabama's single game receiving yards record, finishing with 224.[21] He later matched the record against Auburn.[22] For the season, Cooper had 124 receptions for 1,727 yards and 16 touchdowns, all school records. In addition, his 124 receptions were an SEC record.[23] He became Alabama's all-time leader in receptions (229), receiving yards (3,463), and receiving touchdowns (31).[24][25][26] Cooper was a finalist for the Heisman Trophy, finishing third behind Marcus Mariota and Melvin Gordon.[27] He won the Biletnikoff Award that season and was also named a unanimous All-American.[28][29]

After his junior season, Cooper entered the 2015 NFL Draft.[30][31]

College career statistics

Year Team GP Receiving
Rec Rec–Yards Avg TD Long 100+ Avg/G
2012 Alabama 14 59 1,000 16.9 11 54 5 71.4
2013 Alabama 12 45 736 16.4 4 99 2 61.3
2014 Alabama 14 124 1,727 13.9 16 80 7 123.4
Total 40 228 3,463 15.2 31 99 14 86.6

Professional career

Cooper was considered one of the best wide receivers in the 2015 draft class, together with Kevin White. In most mock drafts, he was projected to be a top 10 pick, with some having him as high as the fourth pick in the 2015 NFL Draft.[32][33]

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad
6 ft 0 78 in
(1.85 m)
211 lb
(96 kg)
31 12 in
(0.80 m)
10 in
(0.25 m)
4.42 s 1.61 s 2.63 s 3.98 s 6.71 s 33 in
(0.84 m)
10 ft 0 in
(3.05 m)
All values from NFL Combine[34][35]

Oakland Raiders

2015 season: Rookie year

The Oakland Raiders selected Cooper in the first round with the fourth overall pick in the 2015 NFL Draft.[36][37] Cooper was initially assigned the jersey number 19, but following the release of fellow receiver James Jones, he switched to number 89. Cooper made his NFL debut for the Oakland Raiders on September 13, 2015. He hauled in 5 receptions for 47 yards in a 33–13 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals.[38] In his second game against the Baltimore Ravens, he had 109 yards receiving including his first touchdown on a 68-yard pass from Derek Carr.[39] In Week 3, he had a franchise rookie record eight receptions for 134 yards in a 27-20 win against the Cleveland Browns, becoming the first Raiders receiver with consecutive 100+ yard receiving games since Randy Moss in 2005.[40][41] Through three games, his 290 receiving yards was third in NFL history. On November 8, 2015, Cooper passed Tim Brown's record for rookie receptions (43) in a 35-38 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers.[42]

On December 20, 2015, Cooper became the first Oakland Raider rookie in franchise history to reach the 1,000-yard mark and the only receiver in the club to reach that same mark since Randy Moss, in 2005.[43] His five 100+ yard receiving games and 72 receptions are also franchise rookie records.[44] On December 22, 2015, Cooper was selected as an alternate for the Pro Bowl, alongside teammates Derek Carr and Latavius Murray;[45] he replaced Brandon Marshall and played.[46]

2016 season

Cooper put together a solid second season in the NFL. In the season opener against the New Orleans Saints, he had six receptions for 137 yards in a 35–34 victory.[47] In Week 5, against the San Diego Chargers, he had six receptions for 138 yards and a touchdown in a 34–31 victory.[48] In Week 8, against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, he had his best game of the season with 12 receptions for 173 yards and a touchdown in a 30–24 overtime victory.[49] Overall, he had 83 receptions for 1,153 yards and five touchdowns.[50] Cooper was named to his second consecutive Pro Bowl on December 20, 2016.[51] He was also ranked 53rd by his peers on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2017.[52]

2017 season

Montae Nicholson (36593715674)
Montae Nicholson of the Washington Redskins makes an interception over Cooper
Amari Cooper 2017
Cooper in 2017

In the season opener against the Tennessee Titans, Cooper had only 5 receptions for 62 yards on 13 targets, though one was a touchdown.[53] After having 33 yards in Week 2, Cooper had three consecutive games with less than 10 receiving yards.[54] However, on Thursday Night Football, in a 31–30 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in Week 7, Cooper had a career-high 210 receiving yards and two touchdowns. His yardage was the most by any NFL player at that point in the 2017 season, the second most in franchise history, and the first 200+ yard game in franchise history since 1965.[55][56] With his stellar performance in Week 7, Cooper earned AFC Offensive Player of the Week.[57] After a string of games without stellar yardage totals, Cooper finished the 2017 season with 3 receptions for 115 yards and a touchdown in a 30–10 loss to the Los Angeles Chargers.[58] It was later revealed that Cooper struggled throughout the latter half of the season from an ankle injury that hampered his play.[59] Cooper finished the 2017 season recording career-lows with 48 receptions for 680 yards but did have a career-high seven receiving touchdowns.[60]

2018 season

On April 22, 2018, the Raiders exercised the fifth-year option on Cooper's contract.[61] In Week 4 against the Cleveland Browns, Cooper caught eight passes for 128 yards and a touchdown in a 45–42 overtime win.[62] During Week 6 against the Seattle Seahawks in London, Cooper was knocked unconscious when he suffered a concussion. The Raiders went on to lose the game 27-3.[63]

Dallas Cowboys

2018 season

On October 22, 2018, Cooper was traded to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for a first-round pick (27th overall, Johnathan Abram) in the 2019 NFL Draft.[64] In his first game with the Cowboys on November 5, Cooper led the team with five receptions for 58 yards and a touchdown as the Cowboys lost to the Tennessee Titans by a score of 28-14.[65] On Thanksgiving Day, Cooper had eight receptions for 180 yards and two touchdowns, including a 90-yard touchdown catch in the third quarter as the Cowboys defeated the Washington Redskins by a score of 31-23. He was named the NFC Offensive Player of the Week for his performance.[66] During Week 14 against the Philadelphia Eagles, Cooper had 10 catches for a career-high 217 yards and three touchdowns. His final touchdown was in overtime and it came off a deflection from Rasul Douglas as the Cowboys won 29-23. His 217 receiving yards were the most by one player for a single game in the 2018 season.[67] For his performance, Cooper earned his second NFC Offensive Player of the Week award.[68] The Cowboys won the NFC East and were the #4-seed for the NFC Playoffs.[69] In the Wild Card Round victory over the Seattle Seahawks, he had seven receptions for 106 receiving yards.[70] In the Divisional Round loss to the Los Angeles Rams, he had six receptions for 65 yards and a touchdown.[71] On January 21, 2019, Cooper was added to the NFC Pro Bowl roster as an injury replacement for New Orleans Saints wide receiver Michael Thomas.[72]

NFL statistics

Regular season

Year Team Games Receiving Rushing Fumbles
GP GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2015 OAK 16 15 72 1,070 14.9 68T 6 3 -3 -1.0 2 0 1 1
2016 OAK 16 14 83 1,153 13.9 64T 5 1 0 0 0 0 2 0
2017 OAK 14 12 48 680 14.2 87T 7 1 4 4.0 4 0 1 0
2018 OAK 6 6 22 280 12.7 36 1 1 9 9.0 9 0 0 0
DAL 9 9 53 725 13.7 90T 6 1 11 11.0 11 0 2 2
Career 61 56 278 3,908 14.1 90T 25 7 21 3.0 11 0 6 3

Postseason

Year Team Games Receiving Rushing Fumbles
GP GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2016 OAK 1 1 2 10 5.0 9 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 DAL 2 2 13 171 13.2 34 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Career 3 3 15 181 12.1 34 1 1 0 0.0 0 0 1 0

See also

References

  1. ^ Rankin, Duane. "Bridgewater impressed with prep teammate Cooper's play at Alabama". The Montgomery Advertiser. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  2. ^ "Why elite receivers from south Fla. keep ending up at Alabama". USA Today High School Sports. September 21, 2016.
  3. ^ "Road to Stardom: Amari Cooper". 24/7 Sports.
  4. ^ Biles, Jonathan (December 12, 2014). "As accolades roll in, Amari Cooper remains quiet, humble and destined for greatness - Yellowhammer News". Yellow Hammer News.
  5. ^ "Rivals.com".
  6. ^ "ESPN Football Recruiting - Player Rankings - ESPN".
  7. ^ "2012 Top Football Recruits".
  8. ^ "Amari Cooper, Oakland WR - Scout".
  9. ^ "WR Amari Cooper Commits to Alabama". rollbamaroll.com. September 22, 2011.
  10. ^ "2012 Alabama Crimson Tide Stats". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  11. ^ "Amari Cooper".
  12. ^ Kausler, Don. "Amari Cooper continues his string of exceptional scrimmages at Alabama". AL.com.
  13. ^ "Georgia vs Alabama Box Score, December 1, 2012". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  14. ^ "BCS Championship - Notre Dame vs Alabama Box Score, January 7, 2013". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  15. ^ Hiserman, Mike; Dufresne, Chris (January 7, 2013). "Alabama crushes Notre Dame, 42-14, for second straight BCS title" – via LA Times.
  16. ^ Wide receiver/tight end preview, Alabama: Cooper a rare talent, tight end spot more uncertain for Tide Archived February 8, 2015, at the Wayback Machine
  17. ^ "Amari Cooper 2013 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  18. ^ Marcello, Brandon. "What happened to Auburn's defense on AJ McCarron's 99-yard touchdown pass in Iron Bowl?". AL.com.
  19. ^ "Sugar Bowl - Oklahoma vs Alabama Box Score, January 2, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  20. ^ "Amari Cooper owns every major Alabama receiving record". FOX Sports. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  21. ^ "Alabama vs. Tennessee - Game Recap - October 25, 2014 - ESPN".
  22. ^ "Auburn vs. Alabama - Game Recap - November 29, 2014 - ESPN".
  23. ^ Champlin, Drew. "Alabama WR Amari Cooper breaks single-season SEC receptions record". AL.com. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  24. ^ "Alabama Crimson Tide Receiving". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  25. ^ "Amari Cooper sets Alabama career yards receiving record". Times Free Press. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  26. ^ Potter, Charlie (September 20, 2014). "Cooper sets touchdown record vs. Florida". BamaOnLine. Retrieved September 24, 2014.
  27. ^ Casagrande, Michael. "Alabama receiver Amari Cooper falls short in Heisman Trophy voting in record-breaking season". AL.com. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  28. ^ Champlin, Drew. "Alabama's Amari Cooper wins Biletnikoff Award for nation's top receiver". AL.com. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  29. ^ Casagrande, Michael. "Alabama WR Amari Cooper makes unanimous All-American". AL.com. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  30. ^ Scarborough, Alex. "Cooper, Yeldon, Collins leaving Bama for draft". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  31. ^ Casagrande, Michael. "Amari Cooper, T.J. Yeldon reportedly leaving Alabama for NFL draft". AL.com. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  32. ^ Davis, Charles (April 15, 2015). "Mock Draft 4.0: Williams falls to Redskins". NFL.com. Retrieved April 16, 2015.
  33. ^ Jeremiah, Daniel (March 18, 2015). "Mock draft 4.0: Bears look to future at QB". NFL.com. Retrieved April 16, 2015.
  34. ^ http://www.nfl.com/draft/2015/profiles/amari-cooper?id=2552487
  35. ^ http://www.draftscout.com/ratings/dsprofile.php?pyid=122519&draftyear=2015&genpos=wr
  36. ^ McDonald, Jerry (April 30, 2015). "NFL Draft: Raiders take receiver Amari Cooper at No. 4". San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved April 30, 2015.
  37. ^ Williamson, Bill (April 30, 2015). "Raiders draft Amari Cooper at No. 4". NFL.com. Retrieved April 30, 2015.
  38. ^ "Cincinnati Bengals at Oakland Raiders - September 13th, 2015". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  39. ^ "Baltimore Ravens at Oakland Raiders - September 20th, 2015". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  40. ^ "Oakland Raiders at Cleveland Browns - September 27th, 2015". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  41. ^ "GAME NOTES: Raiders 27 Browns 20". Raiders.com. September 27, 2015. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  42. ^ "GAME NOTES: Steelers 38 Raiders 35". Raiders.com. November 8, 2015. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  43. ^ Warnemuende, Jeremy (December 20, 2015). "Amari Cooper becomes Raiders' first 1,000-yard WR in 10 years". 247Sports.com. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  44. ^ "Rookie receiving, Raiders franchise history". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  45. ^ Bair, Scott. "Amari Cooper named as alternate in 2016 Pro Bowl". Comcast Sports Network. Retrieved December 22, 2015.
  46. ^ Rapp, Timothy (January 21, 2016). "Amari Cooper Replaces Brandon Marshall at 2016 NFL Pro Bowl". Bleacher Report. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  47. ^ "Oakland Raiders at New Orleans Saints - September 11th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  48. ^ "San Diego Chargers at Oakland Raiders - October 9th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  49. ^ "Oakland Raiders at Tampa Bay Buccaneers - October 30th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  50. ^ Engelage, Christopher (May 22, 2017). "Raiders WR Amari Cooper has been historic in first two seasons". USAToday.com.
  51. ^ "NFL announces 2017 Pro Bowl rosters". NFL.com. December 20, 2016.
  52. ^ "'Top 100 Players of 2017': No. 53 Amari Cooper". NFL.com.
  53. ^ "Oakland Raiders at Tennessee Titans - September 10th, 2017". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 6, 2017.
  54. ^ "Amari Cooper 2017 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  55. ^ Patra, Kevin. "Amari Cooper busts out of slump in big way". NFL. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
  56. ^ "Single-game receiving, Raiders franchise history". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  57. ^ Lam, Quang M. (October 25, 2017). "Carson Wentz, Amari Cooper among Players of Week". NFL.com. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  58. ^ "Oakland Raiders at Los Angeles Chargers - December 31st, 2017". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  59. ^ Wagner-McGough, Sean. "Derek Carr on Amari Cooper's down season: He 'was out there playing on one foot'". CBSSports. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  60. ^ "Amari Cooper 2017 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  61. ^ Alper, Josh (April 22, 2018). "Report: Raiders to exercise Amari Cooper's option". ProFootballTalk.NBCSports.com. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  62. ^ Dubow, Josh (October 1, 2018). "Raiders rally past Browns 45-42 in OT for 1st win for Gruden". AP NEWS. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  63. ^ Pennington, Bill (October 15, 2018). "Helmet-to-Helmet Hits in N.F.L. Haven't Diminished, but Penalty Flags Have". New York Times. Retrieved October 15, 2018.
  64. ^ Archer, Todd (October 22, 2018). "Oakland Raiders to trade Amari Cooper to Dallas Cowboys". ESPN. Retrieved October 22, 2018.
  65. ^ "Titans top Cowboys 28-14 in Amari Cooper's Dallas debut". Las Vegas Review-Journal. November 6, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  66. ^ Around the NFL staff (November 28, 2018). "Philip Rivers, Amari Cooper among Players of the Week". NFL.com. Retrieved March 16, 2019.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
  67. ^ "Most receiving yards, single game, 2018 season". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  68. ^ Knoblauch, Austin (December 12, 2018). "Derrick Henry, Amari Cooper among NFL Players of the Week". NFL.com. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  69. ^ "2018 NFL Standings & Team Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  70. ^ "Wild Card - Seattle Seahawks at Dallas Cowboys - January 5th, 2019". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  71. ^ "Divisional Round - Dallas Cowboys at Los Angeles Rams - January 12th, 2019". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  72. ^ Eatman, Nick. "Cooper, Prescott Added to NFC Pro Bowl Roster". Dallas Cowboys. Retrieved January 22, 2019.

External links

2012 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 2012 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA", "Bama" or "The Tide") represented the University of Alabama in the 2012 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) football season. It marked the Crimson Tide's 118th overall season of playing college football, 79th as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and 21st within the SEC Western Division. The team was led by head coach Nick Saban, in his sixth year, and played its home games at Bryant–Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. It finished the season with a record of 13 wins and 1 loss (13–1 overall, 7–1 in the SEC), as SEC champion and as consensus national champion after it defeated Notre Dame in the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship Game.

After they captured the 2011 national championship, the Crimson Tide signed a highly rated recruiting class in February 2012 and completed spring practice the following April. With twelve returning starters from the previous season, Alabama entered the 2012 season as the defending national champions, ranked as the number two team in the nation and as a favorite to win the Western Division and compete for both the SEC and national championships. The Crimson Tide opened the season with nine consecutive victories that included one over Michigan at a neutral site and a come-from-behind victory on the road at Louisiana State University (LSU). In their tenth game, Alabama was upset by Texas A&M, and dropped to the number four position in the rankings. However, after a series of upsets and victories in their final three games that included winning the SEC Championship over Georgia, Alabama qualified for the 2013 BCS National Championship Game against Notre Dame, where they won 42–14 and captured the 2012 national championship.

At the conclusion of the season, the Alabama defense led the nation in total defense, scoring defense and rushing defense and ranked 7th in passing defense. Offensively, the Alabama offense ranked 12th in scoring offense, 16th in rushing offense, 31st in total offense and 75th in passing offense. Starting quarterback AJ McCarron was ranked first nationally in pass efficiency. Additionally, several players were recognized for their individual accomplishments on the field. Starting center Barrett Jones won both the Rimington Trophy and the William V. Campbell Trophy, and was named as the Academic All-America of the Year; defensive coordinator Kirby Smart was named the 2012 American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) FBS Assistant Coach of the Year. Also, five players were named to various All-America Teams with Jones and C. J. Mosley being consensus selections and Dee Milliner and Chance Warmack being unanimous selections.

2012 SEC Championship Game

The 2012 SEC Championship Game was played on December 1, 2012, in the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, Georgia, and determined both the 2012 football champion of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The game featured the Georgia Bulldogs, winners of the SEC Eastern Division vs the Alabama Crimson Tide, the winner of the SEC Western Division.

Because Alabama and Georgia were both respectively ranked 2 and 3, the game was considered a de facto semifinal game, as the winner would automatically face the undefeated Notre Dame Fighting Irish in the National Championship with no vote necessary. Georgia was the designated "home" team. The game was televised by CBS Sports for the twelfth straight season. Kickoff was scheduled at 4:00 (EST). Alabama won the game 32-28 improving their record to 4-4 in the title game. Alabama's Eddie Lacy was named MVP after rushing for 181 yards and two touchdowns. The game at the time was the most watched college football game of the 2012 season (it would be surpassed by the 2013 BCS National Championship Game on January 7, 2013) with the game receiving a 10.1 share or 21.0 million viewers tuned in.

2013 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 2013 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA", "Bama" or "The Tide") represented the University of Alabama in the 2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 119th overall season, 80th as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and its 22nd within the SEC Western Division. The team was led by head coach Nick Saban, in his seventh year, and played its home games at Bryant–Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of eleven wins and two losses (11–2 overall, 7–1 in the SEC) and with a loss in the 2014 Sugar Bowl to Oklahoma.

After they captured the 2012 national championship, the Crimson Tide signed a highly rated recruiting class in February 2013 and completed spring practice the following April. With thirteen returning starters from the previous season, Alabama entered the 2013 season as the two-time defending national champions, ranked as the number one team in the nation and as a favorite to win the Western Division, the SEC and national championships. The Crimson Tide opened the season with eleven consecutive victories that included one over Virginia Tech at a neutral site, against Texas A&M in a game that saw many team records broken and an emotional victory over Louisiana State University (LSU) at Bryant–Denny Stadium. In their twelfth game, Alabama was upset by Auburn. The loss, in a game known since as "Kick Six," kept the Crimson Tide out of the SEC Championship Game. Although they did not qualify to play for their third consecutive national championship with a final BCS ranking of third, Alabama did accept an invitation to play in the Sugar Bowl. Against Oklahoma, the Crimson Tide lost 45–31.

At the conclusion of the season, Alabama's defense was nationally ranked near the top in total defense, scoring defense, rushing defense and ranked passing defense. Offensively, the Alabama offense ranked 17th in scoring offense, 24th in rushing offense, 33rd in total offense and 49th in passing offense. Additionally, several players were recognized for their individual accomplishments on the field. C. J. Mosley won the Butkus Award as the top collegiate linebacker; AJ McCarron won both the Maxwell Award as the overall player of the year and the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award as the top senior quarterback. Also, four players were named to various All-America Teams with C. J. Mosley being a unanimous selection and Ha Ha Clinton-Dix and Cyrus Kouandjio being consensus selections.

2013 BCS National Championship Game

The 2013 Discover BCS National Championship Game was a postseason college football bowl game that took place on Monday, January 7, 2013, at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida. It featured the No. 1 ranked Notre Dame Fighting Irish and No. 2 Alabama Crimson Tide. The Alabama Crimson Tide defeated the Notre Dame Fighting Irish 42–14 for the national championship and took home the Championship Trophy.

Alabama was the defending champion and represented the Southeastern Conference, which had participated in and emerged victorious from every standalone BCS Championship Game (since the format was introduced in the 2006–2007 season). Notre Dame did not belong to a conference and was the first independent team to play in the National Championship game since the start of the BCS.

The National Championship game between Alabama and Notre Dame was anticipated as an historical matchup with a rich tradition in college football. Going into the holiday season after Alabama was assured a spot in the National Championship after beating Georgia in the SEC Championship, sportscasters from both sides weighed in on who was most likely to win. Despite the historical record of, at the time, 5-1 in favor of Notre Dame many sports betting centers had Alabama as a heavy favorite with point spreads favoring Alabama as high as ten points over Notre Dame. Many prominent sports writers predicted Notre Dame to win based on several factors including strong overall defense, an inconsistent Alabama team (often cited as being "exposed" against LSU and Texas A&M), and various intangibles such as destiny and generalized fatigue from the dominant performances of the Southeastern Conference.In the aftermath of an Alabama 42 to 14 victory (with the score being 35 to 0 at one point in the game), the BCS National Championship game was considered by Sports Illustrated's Michael Rosenberg to have failed to live up to its hype despite dominating television ratings. Mark Schlabach of ESPN expressed the wish that a playoff system had been in place wherein Oregon or Florida would have played against Alabama. Tom Coyne of Associated Press concluded that Alabama was more talented and physical with better preparation and execution of its game plan than Notre Dame. Specifically, inconsistent tackling, blown coverages, and porous defense were cited by Aaron Ellis of Forbes.com as major detriments to Notre Dame's efforts.With the win, Alabama won their second straight BCS championship, their third championship in four years, and their ninth AP championship overall.

2014 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 2014 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA", "Bama" or "The Tide") represented the University of Alabama in the 2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It marked the Crimson Tide's 120th overall season, 81st as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and its 23rd within the SEC Western Division. The team was led by head coach Nick Saban, in his eighth year, and played its home games at Bryant–Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

The Alabama Crimson Tide were 12–2 overall and 7–1 in SEC regular season. The Crimson Tide won the SEC Western Division title for the tenth time, advancing to their ninth SEC Championship Game, where they defeated Missouri 42–13. The Crimson Tide played in the inaugural College Football Playoff as the #1 seed, netting a berth in the CFP semifinal 2015 Sugar Bowl, where they were defeated by the #4 seed Ohio State Buckeyes 42–35.

2014 All-SEC football team

The 2014 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by the Associated Press (AP) and the conference coaches for the 2014 Southeastern Conference football season.

The Alabama Crimson Tide won the conference, beating the Missouri Tigers 42 to 13 in the SEC Championship. The Crimson Tide then lost in the College Football Playoff Semifinal to the eventual national champion, the Ohio State Buckeyes 42 to 35.

Alabama wide receiver Amari Cooper, a unanimous AP selection, was voted the AP SEC Offensive Player of the Year. Missouri defensive end Shane Ray was voted the AP SEC Defensive Player of the Year.

2014 Southeastern Conference football season

The 2014 Southeastern Conference football season began on August 28 with Texas A&M visiting South Carolina on the new SEC Network. This season will feature new inter-division rivalry games: Texas A&M-South Carolina and Arkansas-Missouri.

2015 Oakland Raiders season

The 2015 Oakland Raiders season was the franchise's 46th season in the National Football League, the 56th overall, the 21st of their second stint in Oakland, and the first under new head coach Jack Del Rio. Coming off a 3–13 season the prior year, the Raiders improved to 7–9 on the season. Despite their improvement, the Raiders were eliminated from playoff contention in Week 15 with a loss to the Green Bay Packers at home. They once again failed to finish with a winning record, not having done so since 2002.

.

2015 Sugar Bowl

The 2015 Sugar Bowl was a college football game that was played on January 1, 2015 at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. It was the 81st Sugar Bowl, and a semifinal game in the College Football Playoff. It was one of the 2014–15 bowl games that concluded the 2014 FBS football season. Sponsored by the Allstate insurance company, the game was officially known as the College Football Playoff Semifinal at the Allstate Sugar Bowl.

In the game, the fourth-ranked Ohio State Buckeyes defeated the top-ranked Alabama Crimson Tide by a score of 42–35. The Buckeyes advanced to the College Football Playoff Championship Game against the Oregon Ducks, which was played January 12 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

The contest was televised on ESPN and ESPN Deportes, with a radio broadcast on ESPN Radio and XM Satellite Radio. Kickoff time was set for 8:30 PM, Eastern Standard Time, but was delayed until after the end of the Rose Bowl.

2016 Oakland Raiders season

The 2016 Oakland Raiders season was the 57th overall of the Oakland Raiders franchise, the franchise's 47th season in the National Football League, their 22nd season since their return to Oakland, and the second under head coach Jack Del Rio. The Raiders improved on a 7–9 campaign in 2015 and finished with a winning record for the first time since 2002, finishing the regular season with a 12–4 record.

The Raiders, with their Week 15 win over the San Diego Chargers, clinched a playoff berth for the first time since 2002, ending their 14-year playoff drought. The Raiders finished the season tied with the Kansas City Chiefs for the AFC West division title, but lost the tiebreaker due to a head-to-head sweep.

In a Week 16 game against the Indianapolis Colts, Raiders quarterback Derek Carr suffered a broken fibula while being sacked by Trent Cole and missed the remainder of the season including the Raiders sole postseason game. Backup quarterback Matt McGloin started the final game of the season for Carr, but he suffered a shoulder injury during the game forcing rookie Connor Cook to play. Cook started the Wild Card playoff game against the Houston Texans, making him the first rookie in the Super Bowl era to make his very first NFL start in a playoff game. The Raiders were unable to win their first playoff game since 2002, falling to the Houston Texans 14–27 in a game where Cook threw one touchdown and three interceptions.On January 10, 2017, three days after the loss to the Texans, offensive coordinator Bill Musgrave's contract was not renewed.

Linebacker Khalil Mack was awarded Associated Press NFL Defensive Player of the Year Award at seasons end.

2017 Oakland Raiders season

The 2017 Oakland Raiders season was the 58th overall season of the Oakland Raiders franchise, the franchise's 48th season in the National Football League, their 23rd season since their return to Oakland, and the third and final season under head coach Jack Del Rio. It was the first season for the team since the franchise announced its impending relocation to Las Vegas.

The Raiders began the season on September 10 at the Tennessee Titans and finished the season December 31 at the Los Angeles Chargers. The Raiders, as they did in 2016, played one home game in Mexico City, this time against the New England Patriots. Although the league approved the Raiders' eventual relocation to Las Vegas on March 27, 2017, the team still maintained its lease at the Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum and intended to use the stadium for at least the 2017 and 2018 seasons and, likely, the 2019 season.After a 12–4 record the prior season that saw the Raiders return to the playoffs for the first time since 2002, the Raiders finished the season 6–10, having the biggest drop in number of wins since 2003. They finished in third place in the AFC West and failed to qualify for the playoffs. The season also marked a return to a double-digit loss record for the first time since 2014.

The offense struggled under first year offensive coordinator Todd Downing, ranking 17th (tied with Denver) in yardage rankings, 25th in rushing yards, and 23rd in points. The defense also struggled under Ken Norton Jr., having no interceptions under Norton. Norton was fired on November 21, 2017. However, the defense showed some improvement under Norton's replacement, John Pagano.The Raiders fired head coach Jack Del Rio on December 31, 2017, following the final game of the season and a four-game losing streak.

2018 Dallas Cowboys season

The 2018 season was the Dallas Cowboys' 59th in the National Football League (NFL), their 30th under the ownership of Jerry Jones, their 10th playing their home games at AT&T Stadium, and their eighth full season under head coach Jason Garrett. AT&T Stadium also became the first stadium venue to host the annual draft. For the first time since 2009, wide receiver Dez Bryant was not on the opening day roster, as he was released on April 13, 2018 and later signed with the New Orleans Saints on November 7, 2018. For the first time since 2002, tight end Jason Witten was not on the opening day roster, having announced his retirement on May 3, 2018. For the first time since 2010, kicker Dan Bailey was not on the opening day roster, as he was released on September 1, 2018 and later signed with the Minnesota Vikings on September 17, 2018.

The Cowboys clinched the NFC East division following a Week 16 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and a week later, improved their 9–7 record from the previous season with a win over the New York Giants.

In the playoffs, the Cowboys defeated the Seattle Seahawks 24–22 in the Wild Card round and advanced to the Divisional round, where they lost to the Los Angeles Rams 22–30. Ending their hopes of returning to the NFC Championship for the first time since 1995.

2019 Dallas Cowboys season

The 2019 Dallas Cowboys season will be the franchise's 60th season in the National Football League, the eleventh playing their home games at AT&T Stadium and the ninth full season under head coach Jason Garrett. This season also marks the return of tight end Jason Witten, who retired in 2018 and spent one year as the color analyst for Monday Night Football. For the first time since 2011, wide receiver Cole Beasley will not be on the roster, as he signed with the Buffalo Bills on March 12, 2019.

Alabama Crimson Tide football statistical leaders

Alabama Crimson Tide football statistical leaders identify individual statistical leaders of the Alabama Crimson Tide football program in various offensive categories, including passing, rushing, and receptions and defensive categories, including tackles, interceptions and quarterback sacks. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season and career leaders. The Alabama Crimson Tide football program is a college football team that represents the University of Alabama in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) Southeastern Conference (SEC).

Passing leaders applies to various statistical categories held by quarterbacks. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 2010 to 2013 seasons, AJ McCarron graduated as Alabama's career leader in passing yardage (9,019), completions (686) and touchdowns (77). Alabama's current starting quarterback, Tua Tagovailoa, holds the record for passing yards in a single season, with 3,966 yards in 2018. Tagovailoa also holds the record for passing touchdowns in a single season, with 43 in 2018. John Parker Wilson holds the record for completions in a single season (255), set during the 2007 season. Scott Hunter holds the record for passing yards in a single game (484), set against Auburn in 1969; Gary Hollingsworth holds the school's record for most completions in a game (32), set against Tennessee and shares the record for touchdowns in a game (5), set against Ole Miss during the 1989 season. Tagovailoa tied the record for touchdowns in a game in the 2018 Iron Bowl against Auburn.Rushing leaders applies to various statistical categories held by offensive players who advance the ball rushing. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 1996 to 1999 seasons, Shaun Alexander graduated as Alabama's career leader in rushes (727) and rushing yardage (3,565), though his yardage record was broken by Derrick Henry, who accrued 3,591 rushing yards from 2013 to 2015. Mark Ingram Jr. holds the record for career rushing touchdowns (42), set during his career that spanned from 2008 to 2010; this record has since been tied by Derrick Henry. All three major single-season rushing records were set by Henry in 2015: rushes (395), yards (2,219), and touchdowns (28). Single-game records include Henry for rushes (46) set against Auburn during the 2015 season in which he won the Heisman Trophy; Alexander for yardage (291) set against LSU during the 1996 season; and both Alexander and Santonio Beard for touchdowns (5) set against BYU and Ole Miss during the 1998 and 2002 seasons respectively.Receiving leaders applies to various statistical categories held by offensive players who advance the ball by catching Forward passes. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 2004 to 2007 seasons, D. J. Hall graduated as Alabama's career leader in receptions (194) and receiving yardage (2,923). Amari Cooper holds the record for career receiving touchdowns (20), set during his career that spanned from the 2012 to 2014 seasons. Receiving single-season records include Julio Jones with receptions (78) and receiving yards (1,133), and Amari Cooper with touchdown receptions (11) set during the 2010 and 2012 seasons respectively. Single game records for receptions (13) was set against Tennessee during the 2007 season by Hall and against Florida Atlantic during the 2014 season by Cooper; Jones for yardage (221) set against Tennessee during the 2010 season; and Homan, Michael Vaughn and Al Lary for touchdown receptions (3).In addition to offensive records, many who have played for the Crimson Tide have set various defensive records. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 1983 to 1986 seasons, Wayne Davis graduated as Alabama's career leader in tackles (327); Woodrow Lowe as the single-season leader with 134 in 1974; DeMeco Ryans set the single-game record with 25 against Arkansas in 2003. After his career at Alabama that spanned from the 1990 to 1993 seasons, Antonio Langham graduated as Alabama's career leader in interceptions (19); Hootie Ingram as the single-season leader with 10 in 1952; and several players tied with the single game record of three. Derrick Thomas holds every Alabama record for quarterback sacks with 52 during his career from the 1985 to 1988 seasons, 27 in 1988 and five in a single game against Texas A&M in 1988.These stats are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Brice Butler

Brice Butler (born January 29, 1990) is an American football wide receiver for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Oakland Raiders in the seventh round of the 2013 NFL Draft. He played college football at USC and San Diego State.

Chafie Fields

Chafie Ali Fields (born February 4, 1977 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a sports and talent agent. He is a former professional American football wide receiver in the National Football League. He played college football at Penn State University.

Fields partnered with Joel Segal, the longtime head of Worldwide Entertainment & Sports in 2005. Their firm, Fields Consulting, based in Miami, Florida, represents various athletes and entertainers, most notably Arizona Cardinals 2007 first-round draft pick Levi Brown, Detroit Lions wide receiver Bryant Johnson, Buffalo Bills 2009 first-round pick Aaron Maybin, and Oakland Raiders 2015 first-round selection wide receiver Amari Cooper.

Although Fields resides in Miami, he is a partner in a Philadelphia restaurant, Halal Bilah.

Eddie Jackson (safety)

Eddie Jackson (born December 10, 1992) is an American football free safety for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Alabama.

Fred Biletnikoff Award

The Fred Biletnikoff Award is presented annually to the outstanding receiver in American college football by the Tallahassee Quarterback Club Foundation, Inc. (TQCF), an independent not-for-profit organization. The award was created by the Tallahasee Quarterback Club Foundation, Inc. in 1994. The award is named for Fred Biletnikoff, who played college football at Florida State University and professionally with the Oakland Raiders. Any NCAA Division I FBS player who catches the football through the forward pass is eligible to be selected as the award winner, although every winner since 1994 has been a wide receiver. A national selection committee consisting of over 540 journalists, commentators, broadcasters, and former players selects the award winner. No member of the board of trustees of the foundation has a vote.

Johnathan Abram

Johnathan Jauquez Abram (born October 25, 1996) is an American football safety for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League. He played college football at Mississippi State.

Dallas Cowboys current roster
Active roster
Reserve lists
Draft picks

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.