Amanda Beard

Amanda Ray Beard (born October 29, 1981), also known by her married name Amanda Brown, is an American swimmer and a seven-time Olympic medalist (two gold, four silver, one bronze). She is a former world record holder in the 200-meter breaststroke (long course).

Beard's success has earned her the American Swimmer of the Year Award twice. She has won a total of twenty-one medals in major international competition, five gold, thirteen silver, and three bronze spanning the Olympics, the World Championships, the Pan Pacific Championships, and the Summer Universiade.

Amanda Beard
Amanda Beard at Heart Truth 2009
Beard at the 2009 Heart Truth fashion show
Personal information
Full nameAmanda Ray Beard
National team United States
BornOctober 29, 1981 (age 37)
Newport Beach, California, U.S.
Height5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Weight130 lb (59 kg)
WebsiteAmandaBeard.net
Sport
SportSwimming
StrokesBreaststroke, individual medley
ClubIrvine Novaquatics
College teamUniversity of Arizona

Career

1996 Summer Olympic Games

At the age of 14, Beard made her first Olympic appearance at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, while still a student at Irvine High School in Irvine, California.[1] She was often photographed clutching her teddy bear, even on the medal stand. Beard became the second-youngest Olympic medalist in American swimming history when she won three medals in Atlanta—one gold and two silver.[2]

2000–2003

At the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia, Beard won a bronze a medal in the 200-meter breaststroke.[3]

Beard attended the University of Arizona, where she competed for the Arizona Wildcats swimming and diving team. She won an individual NCAA Division I championship in 2001. In 2003, she became the world champion and American record-holder in the 200-meter breaststroke.

2004 Summer Olympic Games

At the 2004 U.S. Olympic Swim Trials, she qualified to participate in four events at the Athens games and broke the world record in the 200-meter breaststroke. She went on to win the gold medal in the 200-meter breaststroke.[4] Beard also won silver in both the 200-meter individual medley and the 4×100-meter medley relay. Her split in the medley relay was the fastest out of the eight competing (1:06.32)

2008 Summer Olympic Games

At the 2008 U.S. Olympic Swim Trials, Beard finished second in the 200-meter breaststroke event, and she qualified for her fourth consecutive Olympics. On July 30, 2008, at the U.S. swimming team's final training in Singapore, Beard, together with Dara Torres and Natalie Coughlin, were elected co-captains of the U.S. Olympic women's swimming team.[5]

In Beijing, Beard failed to reach the semi-finals in the 200-meter breaststroke, placing 18th in the preliminaries.

2010 U.S. Swimming Nationals

In August 2010, she came out of retirement to compete at the 2010 Conoco Phillips National Championships. She finished second in the 200-meter breaststroke finals at 2:26.50, qualifying her for the Pan Pac team to represent the United States later in the month.

In the 100-meter breaststroke, Amanda Beard swam a 1:08.72 in prelims and 1:09.12 in finals, finishing 6th.[6]

After the U.S. Nationals, Beard and Natalie Coughlin were nominated co-captains of U.S. national team once again. During the Pan Pacific Swimming Championships, Amanda Beard signed up for her two signature events, the 100- and the 200-meter breaststroke. Beard qualified for finals in both events, but failed to medal. She was fifth in the 100-meter breaststroke (1:07.49) and fifth in the 200-meter breaststroke (2:24.30).[7]

2012 Summer Olympic Games

Beard failed to qualify for the 2012 Olympic team after finishing 5th in the 200-meter breaststroke at the Olympic swimming trials.[8]

Modeling and advertising

Her modeling work has included appearances in FHM,[9] the 2006 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition, and the July 2007 issue of Playboy magazine, in which she posed nude.[10]

She is a spokeswoman for Defenders of Wildlife, and enjoys interior decorating. Both of her sisters, Leah and Taryn, are swimmers. Amanda placed eighth in the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach Celebrity car race in 2006.

In November 2007, Beard made her first television commercial for GoDaddy entitled "Shock". It featured her "flashing" the seven Olympic medals she won from 1996–2004. Mark Spitz made a cameo appearance.[11]

In April 2008, she joined Fox Network's popular sports talk program, The Best Damn Sports Show Period as a correspondent, covering major sporting events.[12]

In 2008, Beard participated in an anti-fur campaign for the organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). She was photographed nude (again covering her breasts and not exposing her nipples) in front of an American flag. The flag in that photograph is hung incorrectly according to the United States Flag Code with the blue field to the upper right.[13] Shortly after the PETA campaign was released, accusations of hypocrisy surfaced. Beard had told a fashion blogger the year before that her favorite shoes were leather sandals, and she had stated during an interview with SmartMoney magazine that she would never buy a low-quality leather jacket.[14]

Personal life

Beard is a vegetarian.[15] She reports a case of mild dyslexia, which caused trouble with grades in school.[16] She is married to photographer Sacha Brown. On September 15, 2009, she gave birth to their first child, a boy named Blaise Ray Brown.[17][18][19] Their daughter, Doone Isla Brown, was born on June 19, 2013.[20]

Bulimia nervosa

After achieving an athletic scholarship to the University of Arizona, Beard began to struggle with bulimia nervosa.[16] Stress from wearing a swimsuit in front of others as well as seeing the photo-shopping process of her ads caused Beard to desire having a body which matched that in her photos. Beard has further claimed that "even if the purging had hurt my swimming, I wouldn't have stopped. I wanted to be a great swimmer, but more than that, I wanted to be pretty, skinny, and perfect."[21]

Autobiography

Beard released an autobiography on April 3, 2012, entitled In the Water They Can't See You Cry: A Memoir.[22] She explains the title's significance as the sensation of putting her face in the water while swimming to hide any tears she shed into her goggles.[21] The book cites her parents' divorce at the age of 12 as the beginning of her personal struggles,[16] as well as her perfectionist nature.[22] In the memoir, Beard chronicles struggles with self-mutilation, depression and drug use. She credits Brown with encouraging her to seek therapy.[16]

Personal bests

Beard's personal bests in long-course meters are:

See also

References

  1. ^ Klein, Sarah A. "Conquering Heroine; Amanda Beard Welcomed Back After Olympic Trial Swim Wins", Los Angeles Times, March 15, 1996. Retrieved January 15, 2008.
  2. ^ "Amanda Beard". Archived from the original on August 14, 2008. Retrieved August 14, 2008.
  3. ^ "ESPN Sydney Swimming". Retrieved March 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "2004 Olympic Games swimming results". CNN. Retrieved July 22, 2007.
  5. ^ "U.S. swim teams name captains for Beijing". The Los Angeles Times. July 30, 2008.
  6. ^ Swimming Results | National Championship | Swimsuit Model at Archived August 7, 2010, at the Wayback Machine. Star-meets.org. Retrieved on January 14, 2012.
  7. ^ Star Meet | Music | Entertainment | Magazine | Celebrity | Fashion | Concert at. Star-meets.org. Retrieved on January 14, 2012.
  8. ^ Hansen, Greg (July 1, 2012). "Beard falls short in try for fifth Olympics". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved July 1, 2012.
  9. ^ "FHM Modeling pictures". Archived from the original on August 24, 2008. Retrieved August 18, 2008.
  10. ^ Wojciechowski, Gene. "Beard's decision to bare all is either brilliant business … or all wet". ESPN.com. Retrieved June 2, 2008.
  11. ^ "Amanda Beard GoDaddy 'Shock' commercial". TimedFinals.com. November 7, 2007. Archived from the original on September 15, 2008.
  12. ^ "Amanda Beard on FSN's Best Damn Sports Show Period". FoxSports.com. Archived from the original on December 20, 2008.
  13. ^ "Olympic Swimmer in Naked Controversy; PETA Sorry for Backwards Flag Flap". TV Guide. June 30, 2008. Archived from the original on August 10, 2008.
  14. ^ Bird, Cameron (August 6, 2008). "Is Amanda Beard an animal rights hypocrite?". The Orange County Register. Retrieved January 7, 2011.
  15. ^ "Amanda Beard Talks About Being Naked". Washington Post. Retrieved June 4, 2009.
  16. ^ a b c d "Olympic swimmer Amanda Beard recounts drug abuse, bulimia in book". CBS News. April 6, 2012.
  17. ^ "Amanda Beard Says Her Engagement 'Rocks!'". People Magazine. February 13, 2009. Archived from the original on February 15, 2009. Retrieved February 14, 2009.
  18. ^ "Olympic Swimmer Amanda Beard Welcomes a Boy". People Magazine. September 15, 2009.
  19. ^ Crouse, Karen (July 31, 2010). "Olympic Swimmer Amanda Beard Finds Joy Out of the Pool". The New York Times.
  20. ^ "Amanda Beard Welcomes Daughter Doone Isla". People Magazine. June 20, 2013.
  21. ^ a b Liza Ghorbani (March 22, 2012). "Amanda Beard: My Secret Life". Marie Clare.
  22. ^ a b Beard, Amanda; Rebecca Paley (April 3, 2012). In the Water They Can't See You Cry: A Memoir. Touchstone. ISBN 145164437X.

External links

Records
Preceded by

Qi Hui
Leisel Jones
Women's 200-meter breaststroke
world record-holder

July 25, 2003 (tied) – July 10, 2004
July 12, 2004 – July 29, 2005
Succeeded by

Leisel Jones
Leisel Jones
Awards
Preceded by
Natalie Coughlin
Swimming World
American Swimmer of the Year

2003–2004
Succeeded by
Katie Hoff
1996 United States Olympic Trials (swimming)

The 1996 United States Olympic Trials for swimming events was held from March 6–12 in Indianapolis, Indiana. It was the qualifying meet for American swimmers who hoped to compete at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta.

2002 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships

The ninth edition of the Pan Pacific Swimming Championships, a long course (50 m) event, was held in 2002 in Yokohama International Swimming Pool in Yokohama, Japan, from August 24–29. One world record was set over the six-day competition.

2002 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships – Women's 200 metre breaststroke

The women's 200 metre breaststroke competition at the 2002 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships took place on August 27–28 at the Yokohama International Swimming Pool. The last champion was Penelope Heyns of South Africa.This race consisted of four lengths of the pool, all in breaststroke.

2004 United States Olympic Trials (swimming)

The 2004 United States Olympic Trials for swimming events was held from July 7–14 in Long Beach, California. It was the qualifying meet for American swimmers who hoped to compete at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens.

2006 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships – Women's 100 metre breaststroke

The women's 100 metre breaststroke competition at the 2006 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships took place on August 18 at the Saanich Commonwealth Place. The last champion was Amanda Beard of US.This race consisted of two lengths of the pool, both lengths being in breaststroke.

2006 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships – Women's 200 metre breaststroke

The women's 200 metre breaststroke competition at the 2006 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships took place on August 20 at the Saanich Commonwealth Place. The last champion was Amanda Beard of US.This race consisted of four lengths of the pool, all in breaststroke.

Dave Salo

David Clark "Dave" Salo is a swimming coach based in Southern California, United States. Currently, he is the head coach of the men's and women's swimming team at University of Southern California, as well as USC's club team: Trojan Swim Club. Prior to his becoming the USC coach in 2007, he was the head coach of Irvine Novaquatics, a position he held since the Fall of 1990, and was head coach of Soka University of America's men's and women's swimming teams from 2003 to 2006. He currently remains Novaquatics' General Manager.

He was hired as head coach of Novaquatics after a previous appointment with the University of Southern California where he served as Men's Assistant Coach under head coach Peter Daland. While at USC, Salo assisted with the sprint group while also serving as recruiting coordinator during his final two years at the university. During Salo's tenure the Trojans earned NCAA top five honours, taking second in 1986 and 1987.

While head coach of the Irvine Novaquatics, Salo led his team to a number of age group championships (BC and Junior Olympic) as well as several Junior National Team Championships and the United States Swimming National Championships (Men, Women, Combined, Combined Under 18).

Along with team championships, Salo coached five swimmers - Amanda Beard, Aaron Peirsol, Jason Lezak, Gabrielle Rose, and Staciana Stitts - that represented the United States at the 2000 Olympic Games, winning five medals.

In 2003, Salo was Director of Aquatics and head coach at Soka University of America.In 2004, Salo coached Jason Lezak, Colleen Lanne', Gabe Woodward and Lenny Krayzelburg to the USA Olympic Team. He also served as Assistant Coach for the USA's men's team.

In 2012, Salo coached Jessica Hardy, Rebecca Soni, Ricky Berens, Eric Shanteau, and Haley Anderson to the USA Olympic Team, along with Katinka Hosszú to the Hungarian Team and Oussama Mellouli to the Tunisia Team. He was one of the assistant coaches. His relationship with Hosszú has been controversial; according to her, when she looked for advice during the 2012 Summer Olympics, Salo replied that she should worry because she "can always open a beauty salon"; after the incident, Hosszú left Salo and began training with Shane Tusup.Salo has also served as assistant coach for the USA Women's team in the 1999 Pan American Games as well as the 2000 Olympic Games and headed the Men's Team at the Goodwill Games in 2001 and the 2005 World Championship Team.

Salo is a graduate of Long Beach State (B.A. and M.A.) and the University of Southern California (Ph.D.)

Eddie Reese

Edwin Charles Reese (born July 23, 1941) is an American college and Olympic swimming coach and former college swimmer. Reese has been the head coach of the Texas Longhorns men's swimming and diving team that represents the University of Texas in Austin, Texas since 1978, and previously served as the men's head coach for the United States' Olympic Swimming Team in 2004 and 2008, as well as an assistant coach at the 1992, 1996, 2000 and 2012 Summer Olympics.

Jon Urbanchek

Jon Urbanchek is an American swimming coach, best known for his 22-year tenure as the head coach of the Michigan Wolverines swimming and diving team of the University of Michigan from 1982 to 2004. He has served as a coach on multiple United States national swim teams, including the U.S. Olympic swim teams in 2004 and 2008.

He is of Hungarian descent.

List of Olympic medalists in swimming (women)

This is the complete list of women's Olympic medalists in swimming.

Swimming at the 1996 Summer Olympics

The swimming competition at the 1996 Summer Olympics was held at the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center in Atlanta, United States. There were 762 competitors from 117 countries. This was the last Olympics where swimming B-finals were held.

At the time of the games, the facility had a temporary 50m warm-up pool located behind the locker rooms and entry concourse (on the ground); as well as a temporary roof, and open walls (there were wall-like structures/curtains at the diving well and turning end of the pool). The open walls allowed for temporary seating to be in place during the games. A wall and new roof have since been placed on the facility.

Swimming at the 1996 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 metre breaststroke

The women's 200 metre breaststroke event at the 1996 Summer Olympics took place on 21 July at the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center in Atlanta, United States.

Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 metre breaststroke

The women's 200 metre breaststroke event at the 2000 Summer Olympics took place on 20–21 September at the Sydney International Aquatic Centre in Sydney, Australia.Charging back from third at the 150-metre turn, Hungary's Ágnes Kovács edged out U.S. swimmer Kristy Kowal on the final stretch to capture the gold in 2:24.35. Kowal, who seized off a powerful lead from the start, took home the silver in a new American record of 2:24.56. Her teammate Amanda Beard, silver medalist in Atlanta four years earlier, gave the Americans a further reason to celebrate as she enjoyed the race to move up from eighth after the semifinals for the bronze in 2:25.35, holding off a fast-pacing Qi Hui of China (2:25.36) by a hundredth of a second (0.01).Qi was followed in fifth by Russia's Olga Bakaldina (2:25.47) and in sixth by South Africa's Sarah Poewe (2:25.72), fourth-place finalist in the 100 m breaststroke. Japan's Masami Tanaka (2:26.98) and Qi's teammate Luo Xuejuan (2:27.33) closed out the field.World record holder Penny Heyns missed a chance to defend her Olympic title in the event, after helplessly winding up a twentieth-place effort in the prelims at 2:30.17. Shortly after the Games, she made a decision to officially announce her retirement from international swimming.Earlier, Kovacs established a new Olympic standard of 2:24.92 on the morning prelims to clear a 2:25-barrier and cut off Heyns' record by almost half a second (0.50). Following by an evening session, she eventually lowered it to 2:24.03 in the semifinals.

Swimming at the 2003 World Aquatics Championships – Women's 200 metre breaststroke

The Women's 200 Breaststroke event at the 10th FINA World Aquatics Championships swam 24 – 25 July 2003 in Barcelona, Spain. Preliminary and semifinal heats swam on July 24, with the Final swum on July 25.

At the start of the event, the World (WR) and Championship (CR) records were:

WR: 2:22.99 swum by Hui Qi (China) on 13 April 2001 in Hangzhou, China.

CR: 2:24.90 swum by Ágnes Kovács (Hungary) on 25 July 2001 in Fukuoka, Japan

Swimming at the 2004 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 metre breaststroke

The women's 200 metre breaststroke event at the 2004 Olympic Games was contested at the Olympic Aquatic Centre of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex in Athens, Greece on August 18 and 19.U.S. swimmer and world-record holder Amanda Beard completed a full set of medals in the event, adding a gold to her silver from Atlanta (1996) and bronze from Sydney (2000). She posted an Olympic record of 2:23.37, holding off Australia's Leisel Jones by 0.23 of a second for a silver medal in 2:23.60. Anne Poleska, who had been seventh at the halfway mark, moved quickly into the field and finished strongly with a bronze in a personal best of 2:25.82, earning Germany's first individual medal of the meet since its reunification in 1990.Hungary's Ágnes Kovács, the gold medalist from Sydney, finished outside the medals in fifth place behind Japan's Masami Tanaka with a time of 2:26.12.

Swimming at the 2004 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 metre individual medley

The women's 200 metre individual medley event at the 2004 Olympic Games was contested at the Olympic Aquatic Centre of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex in Athens, Greece on August 16 and 17.Ukraine's Yana Klochkova became the first woman to claim two consecutive Olympic titles in the individual medley, finishing the final race with a time of 2:11.14. American swimmer and three-time Olympian Amanda Beard took home the silver, in an American record time of 2:11.70, while Zimbabwe's Kirsty Coventry, on the other hand, broke an African record of 2:12.72 to earn the bronze medal.

Swimming at the 2004 Summer Olympics – Women's 4 × 100 metre medley relay

The women's 4×100 metre medley relay took place on 20–21 August at the Olympic Aquatic Centre of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex in Athens, Greece.The Australians reinforced their claim to become the strongest women's team in the world with a convincing triumph over their American rivals in the event. Giaan Rooney, Leisel Jones, Petria Thomas, and Jodie Henry broke almost a full second off the world record set by Team USA in 2000, stopping the clock at 3:57.32. At the start of the race, the U.S. team got off to a flying start in the backstroke, until the Australians reeled them in on the butterfly leg. Thomas blasted a remarkable split of 56.67, the fastest of all-time in Olympic history, to overhaul Jenny Thompson of the U.S. team, and eventually move the Aussies in front of the race. The anchor freestyle leg left Henry to go up against Kara Lynn Joyce, and the Australians looked unbeatable with Henry, touching the wall first in 52.97, the second-fastest split of all-time.Meanwhile, the U.S. team of Thompson, Joyce, Natalie Coughlin, and Amanda Beard settled only for the silver in 3:59.12, almost two seconds behind the Aussies. The Germans maintained their pace to earn a bronze, and finished in a European record of 4:00.72.Competing in her fourth Olympics for Team USA, Thompson became the most decorated American athlete in history with her twelfth career medal, including 10 from the relays.

Swimming at the 2005 World Aquatics Championships – Women's 200 metre breaststroke

The Women's 200 Breaststroke event at the 11th FINA World Aquatics Championships swam 28–29 July 2005 in Montreal, Canada. Preliminary and Semifinal heats swam on 28 July, with the Prelims during the morning session and the Semifinals during the evening session. The Final

swam in the evening session on 29 July.

At the start of the event, the existing World (WR) and Championships (CR) records were:

WR: 2:22.44, Amanda Beard (USA) swum 12 July 2004 in Long Beach, USA

CR: 2:22.99, Amanda Beard (USA) swum 25 July 2003 in Barcelona, Spain

Swimming at the 2008 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 metre breaststroke

The women's 200 metre breaststroke event at the 2008 Olympic Games took place on 13–15 August at the Beijing National Aquatics Center in Beijing, China.U.S. swimmer Rebecca Soni pulled away over the final lap to capture gold and set a new world record of 2:20.22. Australia's world record holder and top favorite Leisel Jones enjoyed a strong lead in the first 100 metres, but ended up only with a silver in 2:22.05, almost two seconds behind Soni. Meanwhile, Sara Nordenstam earned Norway's second Olympic medal in swimming, as she powered home with a bronze in a European record of 2:23.02.Austria's Mirna Jukić finished outside the medals in fourth place at 2:23.24, while Russia's Yuliya Yefimova set a national record of 2:23.76 to hold off Canada's Annamay Pierse (2:23.77) for a fifth spot by a hundredth of a second (0.01). Japanese duo Rie Kaneto (2:25.14) and Megumi Taneda (2:25.23) closed out the field.Notable swimmers failed to reach the top 8 final, featuring Germany's Anne Poleska, bronze medalist in Athens four years earlier. Competing at her fourth Olympics, defending champion Amanda Beard placed eighteenth in 2:27.70, but missed the semifinals by 0.42 seconds.Earlier in the prelims, Soni posted a top-seeded time of 2:22.17 to lead the heats, cutting off Beard's Olympic record by exactly two-tenths of a second (0.20).

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