Alvin Crowder

Alvin Floyd Crowder (January 11, 1899 – April 3, 1972), nicknamed "General", was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played eleven seasons in the American League with the Washington Senators, the St. Louis Browns, and the Detroit Tigers. In 402 career games, Crowder pitched 2344.1 innings and posted a win-loss record of 167–115, with 150 complete games, 16 shutouts, and a 4.12 earned run average (ERA).

Alvin Crowder
AlvinCrowderGoudeycard
Pitcher
Born: January 11, 1899
Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Died: April 3, 1972 (aged 73)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 24, 1926, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
June 26, 1936, for the Detroit Tigers
MLB statistics
Win–loss record167–115
Earned run average4.12
Strikeouts799
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Born in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Crowder served almost three years in the army in World War I, including assignments in the Philippines and 11 months with the American Expeditionary Force in Siberia.[1] However, he never reached the rank of "General." His nickname, "General" Crowder, came from General Enoch Crowder, who designed the World War I draft lottery in the United States.[2][1]

Crowder learned to play baseball when he was a private in the Army. He had been shipped from Siberia to the Philippines and back again before a Pacific Coast League scout offered him a job.[3]

Career

Although he signed his first baseball contract in 1920, he did not play a full season until 1923 with the Winston-Salem Twins. He did not play in his first major league game until he was 27 in 1926. He won only 7 games in each of his first two seasons, but finished the 1928 season with a record of 21–5 for the Browns. His .808 win percentage was the best in the American League, and his 21 wins was 4th best in the league.

Crowder won 20 games in three different seasons, including a 26–13 record in 1932, the most wins in the American League. In that same season, Crowder set the record, which he still holds, for the most innings pitched in a season without hitting a batter, with 327.[4] In 1933, Crowder won 24 games, again the most in the AL, helped the Senators win the pennant, pitched in the first Major League Baseball All-Star Game, and finished 7th in the American League Most Valuable Player voting.

The Detroit Tigers selected Crowder off waivers on August 3, 1934. He went 5–1 for the Tigers down the stretch, helping them win their first pennant in 25 years. He faced the Yankees in two series late in the 1934 season, winning the opening game in both series. those two victories helped the Tigers pass the Yankees for the American League pennant. In the 1934 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, he lost Game 1 to Dizzy Dean.

In 1935, he was 16–10 for the Tigers as the club won its second consecutive American League pennant. He pitched a complete game in Game 4 of the 1935 World Series for a 2–1 victory to help the Tigers win their first World Series championship. Crowder pitched in three World Series consecutively (1933–1935), posting a record of 1–2 with 3.81 ERA in 26 innings pitched.

Crowder was also known as "Yankee Killer", for his success against the Yankees and Babe Ruth in particular.[5]

In his career, Crowder had a 167–115 record with a 4.12 ERA.

He was a good fielding pitcher in his career, recording a .984 fielding percentage , making only 7 errors in 450 total chances. After making an error against the New York Yankees on May 19, 1932, he went the rest of his career without making another, covering 209 games pitched and handling 180 total chances without a miscue. As a hitter, he went 164-847, for a .194 batting average with 66 runs scored and 60 RBI.

Post-baseball

After his playing career ended, Crowder returned to Winston-Salem where he operated the Winston-Salem Twins during the late 1930s and early 1940s. In 1967, Crowder was named to North Carolina's Sports Hall of Fame.

Crowder died in 1972 at age 73 in Winston-Salem.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Deveaux 2001, p. 105.
  2. ^ "General Crowder". BaseballLibrary.com. Archived from the original on 29 June 2011. Retrieved July 14, 2011.
  3. ^ Sport 1933, p. 2.
  4. ^ "Single Season Hit by Pitch Records". baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved 5 August 2016.
  5. ^ "Former Major League Pitcher Dies Here". The Winston-Salem Journal. April 4, 1972. Retrieved July 13, 2011.

References

External links

1926 Washington Senators season

The 1926 Washington Senators won 81 games, lost 69, and finished in fourth place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1927 St. Louis Browns season

The 1927 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 59 wins and 94 losses.

1927 Washington Senators season

The 1927 Washington Senators won 85 games, lost 69, and finished in third place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1928 St. Louis Browns season

The 1928 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 3rd in the American League with a record of 82 wins and 72 losses.

1929 St. Louis Browns season

The 1929 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 4th in the American League with a record of 79 wins and 73 losses.

1930 St. Louis Browns season

The 1930 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 64 wins and 90 losses.

1930 Washington Senators season

The 1930 Washington Senators won 94 games, lost 60, and finished in second place in the American League. They were managed by Walter Johnson and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1932 Major League Baseball season

The 1932 Major League Baseball season.

1932 Washington Senators season

The 1932 Washington Senators won 93 games, lost 61, and finished in third place in the American League. They were managed by Walter Johnson and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1933 Major League Baseball season

The 1933 Major League Baseball season featured ballplayers hitting eight cycles, tied for the most of any single major league season; all eight cycles in each of those seasons were hit by different players.

1933 Washington Senators season

The 1933 Washington Senators was a season in American baseball. They won 99 games, lost 53, and finished in first place in the American League. It was the third and final pennant of the franchise while based in Washington. The team was managed by Joe Cronin and played home games at Griffith Stadium. They lost the best-of-seven World Series in 5 games to the New York Giants.

It would be the last time a Major League Baseball postseason series would be held in Washington until the 2012 season. The Senators franchise, which moved to Minneapolis–St. Paul after the 1960 season, has since won three American League pennants (1965; 1987; 1991) and two World Series (1987 and 1991) as the Minnesota Twins.

1934 Detroit Tigers season

The 1934 Detroit Tigers season was the 34th season for the Detroit Tigers since entering the American League in 1901. The Tigers won the American League pennant with a record of 101–53, the best winning percentage in team history. The team made its fourth World Series appearance, but lost the 1934 World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals 4 games to 3.

1935 Detroit Tigers season

The 1935 Detroit Tigers won the 1935 World Series, defeating the Chicago Cubs 4 games to 2. The season was their 35th since they entered the American League in 1901. It was the first World Series championship for the Tigers.

1936 Detroit Tigers season

The 1936 Detroit Tigers season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 83–71, 19½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1939 Cleveland Indians season

The 1939 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 86–66, 13 games behind the New York Yankees.

Crowder (surname)

Crowder is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Jay Crowder, Pianist and music director- born 1967[Alfred Crowder]] (1878–1961), English cricketer

Alvin Crowder, baseball pitcher

Channing Crowder, NFL linebacker

David Crowder, American musician

Enoch Crowder, American World War I general

Frederick Crowder (politician) (1850-1902), Australian politician

Jae Crowder (born 1990), American basketball player

Jamison Crowder, American football player

Jean Crowder, Canadian politician

John Crowder, British politician

Petre Crowder, British politician

Norman Crowder (1926–2013), English Anglican Archdeacon

Randy Crowder, defensive lineman

Richard Crowder (died 1859), Judge Advocate of the Fleet from 1849-1854

Richard T. Crowder, Chief Agricultural Negotiator in the Office of the US Trade Representative

Shirley Crowder (born 1939), American track and field athlete

Steven Crowder, American actor, conservative political commentator, and comedian

Tim Crowder (football), American football player

Trae Crowder, American actor, liberal political commentator, and comedian

List of Washington Senators Opening Day starting pitchers

Two American League baseball franchises have borne the name "Washington Senators". The first franchise was one of the teams that was originally part of the American League when it became a Major League in 1901. That franchise moved to Minnesota after the 1960 season, becoming the Minnesota Twins. It was replaced by a new Washington Senators franchise in 1961. That franchise moved to Arlington, Texas after the 1971 season, becoming the Texas Rangers. The Washington Senators played in three home ball parks over their history. They started in American League Park and moved to American League Park II in 1903. In 1911, they moved to Griffith Park, where they remained until 1961. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day.The 1901-1960 franchise won 32 Opening Day games against 28 losses. The 1901-1960 franchise had a record in Opening Day games at home of 26 wins and 21 losses. On the road, they had an Opening Day record of six wins and seven losses.

The 1901-1960 franchise used 32 Opening Day starting pitchers in their 60 seasons in Washington. One pitcher made Opening Day starts for both franchises. Camilo Pascual made two Opening Day starts for the 1901-1960 franchise, in 1956 and 1960, and later made two Opening Day starts for the 1961-1971 franchise.Walter Johnson holds the record for most Opening Day starts for either franchise, with 14 Opening Day starts for the 1901-1960 franchise between 1910 and 1926, including ten consecutive Opening Day starts from 1912 through 1921. Dutch Leonard made four Opening Day starts for the 1901-1960 franchise between 1940 and 1945. Bob Porterfield made three Opning Day starts for the 1901-1960 franchise between 1952 and 1955. Other pitchers with multiple Opening Day starts for the 1901-1960 franchise are Al Orth, Long Tom Hughes, Charlie Smith, George Mogridge, Alvin Crowder, Earl Whitehill, Early Wynn, Pedro Ramos and Pascual, with two apiece.

The Senators won three American League championships in their history, all by the 1901-1960 franchise. Their championships were won in 1924, 1925 and 1933. They won the World Series in 1924, but lost in 1925 and 1933. The Senators' Opening Day starters in their American League championship years were Johnson in 1924, Mogridge in 1925 and Crowder in 1933.

List of members of the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame

Athletes, coaches, and journalists who have been inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame.

Novarossi

Novarossi World, also known as Novarossi nitro micro engines, are an Italian manufacturer of model engines and related items for radio-controlled models.

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