Allianz Riviera

The Allianz Riviera[3] (also known as the Stade de Nice due to UEFA and FIFA sponsorship regulations[4][5]) is a multi-use stadium in Nice, France, used mostly for football matches of host OGC Nice and also for occasional home matches of rugby union club Toulon. The stadium has a capacity of 36,178 people and replaces the city's former stadium Stade Municipal du Ray. Construction started in 2011 and was completed two years later. The stadium's opening was on 22 September 2013, for a match between OGC Nice and Valenciennes.

The stadium was originally planned to be completed by 2007. However, construction was halted the previous year because of concerns related to the future cost of the structure. Plans for the stadium, located in Saint-Isidore near the Var, were then shelved. The project was revived as part of France's ultimately successful bid to host UEFA Euro 2016. Due to sponsorship regulations, the stadium is known as the Stade de Nice in UEFA competition.[4][5] The stadium hosted six matches at the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.[6]

Allianz Riviera
Allianz Riviera Logo
Allianz inauguration
LocationRue Jules Bianchi, Saint-Isidore, Nice, France
OwnerCity of Nice
Capacity36,178 (Football)[1]
35,169 (Rugby)
44,624 (Concerts)
Record attendance35,596 (OGC Nice vs AS Saint-Étienne, 2015–16 Ligue 1)[2]
Construction
Broke groundJuly 2011
OpenedSeptember 2013
Construction cost250,000,000
Tenants
OGC Nice (2013–present)
RC Toulon (selected matches)
France national football team (selected matches)

UEFA Euro 2016 matches

The stadium was one of the venues of the UEFA Euro 2016 and hosted the following matches:

Date Time (CET) Team #1 Result Team #2 Round Attendance
12 June 2016 18:00  Poland 1–0  Northern Ireland Group C 33,742
17 June 2016 21:00  Spain 3–0  Turkey Group D 33,409
22 June 2016 21:00  Sweden 0–1  Belgium Group E 34,011
27 June 2016 21:00  England 1–2  Iceland Round of 16 33,901

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup matches

The stadium was one of the venues of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. It hosted 4 group games, one round of 16 match, and the third-place playoff.[7] These were the matches it hosted:

Date Time (CEST) Team #1 Result Team #2 Round Attendance
9 June 2019 18:00  England 2–1  Scotland Group D 13,188
12 June 2019 21:00  France 2–1  Norway Group A 34,872
16 June 2019 15:00  Sweden 5–1  Thailand Group F 9,354
19 June 2019 21:00  Japan 0–2  England Group D 14,319
22 June 2019 21:00  Norway 1–1 (4–1 pen.)  Australia Round of 16 12,229
6 July 2019 17:00  England 1–2  Sweden Third place play-off 20,316

Concerts

Concerts at Allianz Riviera
Date Artist Tour Attendance
20 July 2017 Celine Dion Celine Dion Live 2017 30,270
17 July 2018 Beyoncé
Jay-Z
On the Run II Tour 33,662

Gallery

Allianzcoupdenvoi
Nice moved to the Allianz Riviera in September 2013

References

  1. ^ https://www.ogcnice.com/en/stadium/stadium-presentation
  2. ^ https://m.ligue1.com/ligue1/feuille_match/80297
  3. ^ "Allianz Buys Stadium Naming Rights To Ligue 1 Club Nice's New Facility". Sports Business Daily. Retrieved 24 July 2012.
  4. ^ a b "Stade de Nice". UEFA. Retrieved 16 September 2015.
  5. ^ a b "UEFA Europa League - Nice-Schalke". UEFA. Retrieved 10 January 2017.
  6. ^ "The nine host cities confirmed". FIFA. 14 June 2017.
  7. ^ "The nine host cities confirmed". FIFA. 14 June 2017.

External links

Coordinates: 43°42′18.5″N 7°11′33.3″E / 43.705139°N 7.192583°E

2014 in Paraguayan football

The 2014 season is the 104th season of competitive football in Paraguay.

2014–15 OGC Nice season

The 2014–15 OGC Nice season is the 110th professional season of the club since its creation in 1904.

2015–16 OGC Nice season

The 2015–16 OGC Nice season was the 111th professional season of the club since its creation in 1904.

2016–17 OGC Nice season

The 2016–17 OGC Nice season was the 112th professional season of the club since its creation in 1904.

2017–18 OGC Nice season

The 2017–18 OGC Nice season was the 113th professional season of the club since its creation in 1904.

2018–19 OGC Nice season

The 2018–19 OGC Nice season was the 114th professional season of the club since its creation in 1904.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

The United States entered the competition as defending champions after winning the 2015 edition in Canada and successfully defended their title with a 2–0 victory over the Netherlands in the final. In doing so, they secured their record fourth title and became the second nation, after Germany, to have successfully retained the title.

2019–20 in English football

The 2019–20 season is the 140th season of competitive association football in England.

Allianz Stadium

Allianz Stadium may refer to following stadiums with sponsorship arrangements with German financial services company Allianz:

Allianz Arena, an association football stadium in Munich, Germany

Allianz Field, an association football stadium in Saint Paul, Minnesota, U.S.

Allianz Parque, an association stadium in São Paulo, Brazil

Allianz Riviera, a multisport stadium in Nice, France

Allianz Stadion, an association stadium in Vienna, Austria

Barnet Copthall, a rugby and athletics stadium in London, England known as Allianz Park for sponsorship reasons since February 2013

Juventus Stadium, association football stadium in Turin, Italy, known as Allianz Stadium for sponsorship reasons since July 2017

Sydney Football Stadium in Sydney, Australia, known as Allianz Stadium for sponsorship reasons from February 2012 until its October 2018 closure

Drone Racing League

The Drone Racing League (DRL) is a professional drone racing league that operates internationally. DRL pilots race first-person view (FPV) with identical, custom-built drones at speeds above 80 MPH through three-dimensional courses. News publication Quartz described DRL as feeling "like pod-racing from Stars Wars" with "hopes [of becoming] the Formula 1, NASCAR and MotoGP of drone racing."Founded in 2015 and launched publicly in January 2016, DRL is broadcast on ESPN, Sky Sports, ProSiebenSat.1, FOX Sports Asia, Groupe AB, OSN and Disney XD.The league is in its third season, the 2018 DRL Allianz World Championship Season, which features seven races in locations including Allianz Riviera in Nice, France, BMW Welt in Munich, Germany, and The Adventuredome in Las Vegas, Nevada.DRL recently launched the Artificial Intelligence Robotic Racing (AIRR) Circuit, an autonomous drone racing series. It will invite teams of university students and technologists to design an AI framework capable of flying a drone through DRL courses without human intervention and compete for a chance to win $2mm in prizes.

Ellen White (footballer)

Ellen Toni White (born 9 May 1989) is an English international footballer who plays as a forward for Manchester City and the England national team. With England, she has played at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup, the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup and the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, reaching the semi-finals in the latter two tournaments. She was also part of the Great Britain team for the 2012 Summer Olympics.Having progressed through Arsenal Ladies' academy, White returned to the Gunners in 2010 after spells with Chelsea and Leeds United, later joining Notts County.

England women's national football team

The England women's national football team has been governed by the Football Association (FA) since 1993, having been previously administered by the Women's Football Association (WFA). England played its first international match in November 1972 against Scotland. Although most national football teams represent a sovereign state, as a member of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, England is permitted by FIFA statutes to maintain its own national side that competes in all major tournaments, with the exception of the Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

England have qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup five times, reaching the quarter-finals on three occasions; in 1995, 2007, and 2011, finishing third in 2015 and fourth in 2019. They reached the final of the UEFA Women's Championship in 1984 and 2009.

List of football stadiums in France

The following is a list of football stadiums in France, ordered by capacity. Currently all stadiums with a capacity of 20,000 or more are included.

Norway at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Norway women's national football team has represented Norway at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They were runners up in 1991. They won the following tournament in 1995. They also reached the fourth place in 1999 and in 2007.

OGC Nice

Olympique Gymnaste Club Nice Côte d'Azur (French pronunciation: ​[ɔlɛ̃pik ʒimnast nis kot dazyʁ]), commonly referred to as OGC Nice or simply Nice, is a French association football club based in Nice. The club was founded in 1904 and currently plays in Ligue 1, the top tier of French football. Nice plays its home matches at the Allianz Riviera. Nice are managed by former French international Patrick Vieira and captained by Brazilian defender Dante.

Nice was founded under the name Gymnaste Club de Nice and is one of the founding members of the first division of French football. The club has won Ligue 1 four times, the Trophee des Champions 1 time (1970 when it was known as the Challenge des Champions and the Coupe de France three times. Nice achieved most of its honours in the 1950s with the club being managed by coaches such as Numa Andoire, Englishman William Berry, and Jean Luciano. The club's last honour was winning the Coupe de France in 1997 after defeating Guingamp 4–3 on penalties in the final. Nice's colours are red and black.

During the club's successful run in the 1950s, Nice were among the first French clubs to successfully integrate internationals players into the fold. Notable players include Héctor De Bourgoing, Pancho Gonzales, Victor Nurenberg, and Joaquín Valle, the latter being the club's all-time leading goalscorer and arguably greatest player.

Scotland at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Scotland women's national football team has represented Scotland at the FIFA Women's World Cup on one occasion, in 2019.

Stade du Ray

Stade Municipal du Ray was a football stadium in Nice, France. It was the home of OGC Nice since it opened in 1927 and had a capacity of 17,415. It was popular for being located in the center of the city, but suffers from its old structure and small capacity.

The red and black colored stadium was mostly used for football. A new stadium was supposed to be built in the Lingostière side, but the project was cancelled in 2006. The stadium was replaced by the Allianz Riviera in September 2013.

Sweden at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Sweden women's national football team has represented Sweden at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. There were runners up once. and three times bronze medalists: in 1991, in 2011 and in 2019.

Sweden women's national football team

The Sweden women's national football team (Swedish: svenska damfotbollslandslaget) represents Sweden in international women's football competition and is controlled by the Swedish Football Association. The national team has won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers (1987, 1995, 2001). The team has participated in six Olympic Games, eight World Cups, as well as ten European Championships. Sweden won bronze medals at the World Cups in 1991, 2011 and 2019.

The 2003 World Cup-final was the second most watched event in Sweden that year. Lotta Schelin is the top goalscorer in the history of Sweden with 85 goals. Schelin surpassed Hanna Ljungberg's 72-goal record against Germany on 29 October 2014. The player with the most caps is Therese Sjögran, with 214. The team was coached by Thomas Dennerby from 2005 to 2012, and Pia Sundhage from 2012 to 2017. The head coach is Peter Gerhardsson.

After winning the two qualifying matches against Denmark for the Beijing 2008 Olympics, the Swedish Olympic Committee approved of record increases in investments for the women's team. The new budget granted over a million SEK (about US$150,000) for the team and 150,000 SEK (about US$25,000) per player for developing physical fitness. The new grants are almost a 100% increase of the 2005 and 2006 season funds.The developments and conditions of the Sweden women's national football team can be seen in the Sveriges Television documentary television series The Other Sport from 2013.

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