Allen Stack

Allen McIntyre Stack (January 23, 1928 – September 12, 1999) was an American competition swimmer, Olympic champion, and former world record-holder.

Stack won the gold medal in the men's 100-meter backstroke at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London.[1] Four years later at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland. He placed fourth in the final of the same event.[1]

Stack attended Yale University, where he swam for the Yale Bulldogs swimming and diving team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) competition from 1947 to 1949. He graduated from Yale with a bachelor's degree in 1949. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1951 to 1954, and graduated from Columbia University Law School in 1956. He practiced law in Honolulu, Hawaii until 1998.[2]

Stack was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame as an "Honor Swimmer" in 1979.[3]

Allen Stack
Personal information
Full nameAllen McIntyre Stack
National team United States
BornJanuary 23, 1928
New Haven, Connecticut
DiedSeptember 12, 1999 (aged 71)
Honolulu, Hawaii
Sport
SportSwimming
StrokesBackstroke
College teamYale University

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Sports-Reference.com, Olympic Sports, Athletes, Allen Stack. Retrieved October 3, 2012.
  2. ^ Frank Litsky, "Allen Stack, 71, a Swimmer Who Broke 6 World Records," The New York Times (September 19, 1999). Retrieved October 3, 2012.
  3. ^ International Swimming Hall of Fame, Honorees, Allen Stack (USA). Retrieved March 12, 2015.

External links

  • Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill. "Allen Stack". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC.
  • Allen Stack (USA) – Honor Swimmer profile at International Swimming Hall of Fame
Bill Heusner

William Wilder Heusner, Jr. (June 28, 1927 – August 9, 2002) was an American competition swimmer and Pan American Games champion.

Heusner represented the United States at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London, England. He competed in the preliminary heats of the men's 400-meter freestyle, and finished eighth in the final of the men's 1,500-meter freestyle.

At the 1951 Pan American Games, Heusner won the silver medal in the men's 400-meter freestyle, and a gold medal as a member of the winning U.S. team in the men's 4×200-meter freestyle relay event, alongside relay teammates Dick Cleveland, Burwell Jones and Ronald Gora.

Bill Woolsey

William Tripp Woolsey (born September 13, 1934) is an American former competition swimmer and Olympic champion. He represented the United States at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland, where he won a gold medal in the men's 4×200-meter freestyle relay with Wayne Moore, Ford Konno and Jimmy McLane. Four years later at the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, he won a silver medal in the 4×200-meter freestyle relay with Dick Hanley, George Breen and Ford Konno.Woolsey attended Indiana University, and swam for coach Doc Counsilman's Indiana Hoosiers swimming and diving team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) competition.

Bob Cowell (swimmer)

Robert Elmer Cowell (June 12, 1924 – January 11, 1960) was an American competition swimmer, Olympic medalist, and U.S. Navy officer. At the 1948 Summer Olympics in London, England, he received a silver medal for his second-place performance in the men's 100-meter backstroke, finishing with a time of 1:06.5 immediately behind fellow American Allen Stack.Cowell attended the U.S. Naval Academy, where he was a member of the Navy Midshipmen swimming and diving team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) competition from 1944 to 1946. He was a member of Navy's NCAA championship team in the 3x100-yard medley relay in 1944, and won the individual NCAA national championship in the 150-yard backstroke in 1946. He was also the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) national champion in the 100-meter outdoor backstroke in 1945 and the 150-yard indoor backstroke in 1947.

After graduating from the Naval Academy, he became a career U.S. Navy officer. He died in Athens, Georgia in 1960; he was 35 years old. In his memory, the Naval Academy annually presents the Robert E. Cowell Award to the graduating midshipmen who has shown outstanding swimming ability, leadership and good sportsmanship.

Coralie O'Connor

Coralie May O'Connor (born May 1, 1934) is an American former competition swimmer who represented the United States at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki. O'Connor competed in the preliminary heats of the women's 100-meter backstroke and posted a time of 1:19.7.Three years later at the 1955 Pan American Games in Mexico City, O'Connor won a gold medal as a member of the first-place U.S. team in the women's 4×100-meter medley relay. Her gold medal teammates included Mary Sears, Betty Mullen and Wanda Werner. Individually, she also received a silver medal for finishing second in the women's 100-meter backstroke.Beginning in the 1960s, Coralie was for many years the coach of the Worcester Swim Club, a private competitive club that produced numerous prep and college swimmers.

Dick Cleveland

Richard Fitch Cleveland (September 21, 1929 – July 27, 2002) was an American competition swimmer, three-time Pan American Games champion, and former world record-holder.

Cleveland enrolled at Ohio State University, where he swam for the Ohio State Buckeyes swimming and diving team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) competition.

At the 1951 Pan American Games in Bueonos Aires, Argentina, he won gold medals in the men's 3×100-meter medley relay, 4×200-meter freestyle relay, and 100-meter freestyle. At the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland, he competed in the 100-meter freestyle but did not qualify for the event final.

Eugene Rogers

Eugene Roy Rogers (born February 17, 1924) is an American former competition swimmer who represented the United States at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London. He swam for the gold medal-winning U.S. team in the preliminary heats of the men's 4×200-meter freestyle relay. Rogers did not receive a medal, however, because under the Olympic swimming rules in effect in 1948, only those relay swimmers who competed in the event final were medal-eligible. He was inducted into The Columbia University Athletics Hall of Fame.

Jeanne Wilson

Jeanne Elizabeth Wilson (February 18, 1926 – April 18, 2018) was an American competition swimmer who represented the United States at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London. She competed in the preliminary heats of the 200-meter breaststroke, recording a time of 3:18.3.In June 1949 Wilson married Jack Vaughn and changed her last name to Vaughan.

Jimmy McLane

James Price McLane, Jr. (born September 13, 1930) is an American former competition swimmer, three-time Olympic champion, and former world record-holder.

McLane represented the United States as a 17-year-old at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London, England. He won a gold medal as a member of the winning U.S. team in the 4 × 200-meter freestyle relay, with teammates Wally Ris, Wally Wolf and Bill Smith. Ris, McLane, Wolf and Smith set a new world record of 8:46.0 in the event final. Individually, he won another gold medal for his first-place showing in the men's 1,500-meter freestyle, with a time of 19:18.5, finishing almost 13 seconds ahead of Australian John Marshall (19:31.3). He also earned a silver medal for his second-place finish in the men's 400-meter freestyle (4:43.4), finishing behind fellow American Bill Smith (4:41.0).Four years later at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland, he won another gold medal by swimming the anchor leg for the first-place U.S. team in the 4 × 200-meter freestyle relay, together with relay teammates Wayne Moore, Bill Woolsey and Ford Konno. The Americans set a new Olympic record of 8:31.1 in the final. In individual competition, he finished fourth in the men's 1,500-meter freestyle (18:51.5), and seventh in the men's 400-meter freestyle (4:40.3).McLane was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and graduated from Phillips Academy. He attended Yale University, where he swam for the Yale Bulldogs swimming and diving team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) competition. He was a member of Skull and Bones, and graduated from Yale in 1953. He retired from swimming after winning three gold medals at the 1955 Pan American Games. In 1970 he was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

Judith Roberts (swimmer)

Judith Theresa Roberts (May 15, 1934 – November 22, 2016) was an American competition swimmer who represented the United States at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland. Roberts competed in the women's 100-meter freestyle, advanced to the semifinals, and finished fourteenth overall with a time of 1:08.2.Three years later at the 1955 Pan American Games in Mexico City, she won a gold medal as a member of the winning U.S. team in the women's 4×100-meter freestyle relay. Her American relay teammates at the Pan American Games included Carolyn Green, Wanda Werner and Gretchen Kluter.

Swimming at the 1948 Summer Olympics

At the 1948 Summer Olympics in London, 11 swimming events were contested, six for men and five for women. All swimming events took place at the Empire Pool. There was a total of 249 participants from 34 countries competing.

Swimming at the 1948 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metre backstroke

The men's 100 metre backstroke event at the 1948 Olympic Games took place between 4 and 6 August, at the Empire Pool. This swimming event used the backstroke. Because an Olympic-size swimming pool is 50 metres long, this race consisted of two lengths of the pool.

Swimming at the 1951 Pan American Games

Swimming at the 1st Pan American Games took place February 26-March 7, 1951, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Preliminary heats were held February 26–28, with final heats being swum on March 2, 4, 6 and 7.

Swimming at the 1952 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metre backstroke

The men's 100 metre backstroke event at the 1952 Olympic Games took place between 30 July and 1 August, at the Swimming Stadium. This swimming event used the backstroke. Because an Olympic size swimming pool is 50 metres long, this race consisted of two lengths of the pool.

Swimming at the 1955 Pan American Games – Men's 100 metre backstroke

The men's 100 metre backstroke competition of the swimming events at the 1955 Pan American Games took place on 23 March. The last Pan American Games champion was Allen Stack of US.This race consisted of two lengths of the pool, all in backstroke.

Tony Summers

Tony Phillip Summers (3 January 1924 – 21 November 2013) was a British competition swimmer and Olympian. He was born in Newport, South Wales, the son of Edwin Charles Summers. His grandfather was the bonesetter A. E. Kennard.

From an early age he was a well-known figure in Newport Swimming Club, becoming known as Tony the Diver and featuring in a 1930 British Pathè film. During World War II, Summers joined 136 Squadron RAF in 1944 (later 152 Squadron) and flew Spitfires and Tempests in India and the Far East. On his release from the RAF in 1947, Summers started training for the London Olympics of 1948. He had originally aimed to swim in the Olympics of 1940 and 1944, but war had intervened. He represented Great Britain for Men's 100 Metre Backstroke, where his heat was won by the eventual gold medallist, Allen Stack.

Summers worked as an engineer for the Air Ministry and for British Nuclear Fuels, before joining the Forestry Commission where he became Commissioning Engineer for Wales. He continued to swim competitively until shortly before his death and achieved many Welsh and British records in older age groups. Summers died on 21 November 2013. He was survived by his daughter and two grandchildren.

United States at the 1948 Summer Olympics

The United States competed at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London, England. 300 competitors, 262 men and 38 women, took part in 126 events in 19 sports.

Wally Ris

Walter Steven Ris (January 4, 1924 – December 25, 1989) was an American competition swimmer, two-time Olympic champion, and former world record-holder.

Ris won two gold medals at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London, England. He received his first gold medal as a member of the winning U.S. team in the men's 4×200-meter freestyle relay, and set a new world record of 8:46.0 with American teammates Jimmy McLane, Wally Wolf and Bill Smith. In individual competition, he won a second gold in the men's 100-meter freestyle (57.3), finishing a half-second ahead of U.S. teammate Alan Ford (57.8).Ris was a star swimmer at Crane Technical High in Chicago. He then attended the University of Iowa, where he was a member of the Iowa Beta chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon and swam for the Iowa Hawkeyes swimming and diving team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and Big Ten Conference competition from 1947 to 1949. He was the NCAA national champion in the 100-yard freestyle in 1948 and 1949.Ris was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame as an "Honor Swimmer" in 1966.He was born in Chicago, Illinois and died in Mission Viejo, California.

Wally Wolf

Wallace Perry Wolf, Jr. (October 2, 1930 – March 12, 1997) was an American competition swimmer, water polo player, and Olympic champion. He competed in the 1948, 1952, 1956, and 1960 Summer Olympics.

As a 17-year-old representing the United States at the 1948 Olympics in London, he won a gold medal as member of the U.S. team in the men's 4×200-meter freestyle relay. He was the top qualifier in the Olympic Trials Final with a time of 2:14 flat. Four years later at the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki, Finland, he helped the U.S. relay team to qualify for the final of the men's 4×200-meter freestyle relay, but, under the international swimming rule of the time, he was not awarded with a medal because he did not swim in the event final.

He attended the University of Southern California (USC), where he swam for the USC Trojans swimming and diving team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) competition. He graduated from USC with a bachelor's degree in 1951, and later returned to USC to earn a law degree in 1957.Wolf was a member of the U.S. men's team that finished fifth in the 1956 water polo tournament in Melbourne, Australia, playing in five matches. Again, four years later at the 1960 Olympics in Rome, he finished seventh with the U.S. men's water polo team in the 1960 tournament. He played all seven matches and scored five goals.

He was the son of famous vaudeville music director Rube Wolf Sr. and Fanchonnette Sunny (Rutherford) Wolf. He married and had three children- Wallace Scott, John and Lori.

He was born in Los Angeles and died in Santa Ynez, California. He was Jewish.

Yale Bulldogs swimming and diving

Since its inception in 1898, the Yale Bulldogs swimming and diving program has produced numerous champion athletes. Many Yale swimmers have gone on to earn All-American honors and even break world records. The team has won 4 NCAA championships, 30 EISL championships, and several AAU championships. Under legendary coach Robert J. H. Kiphuth, the Yale men swam to a record of 528 wins and 12 losses. As of February 2009, the men's program has a record of 1063 wins and 210 losses over 112 years. The first varsity women's team competed in 1975.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.