Allen Brown

Allen Brown (born March 2, 1943) is a former American football tight end in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers. He played college football at the University of Mississippi.

Allen Brown
No. 83
Born:March 2, 1943 (age 76)
Natchez, Mississippi
Career information
Position(s)Tight end
Height6 ft 5 in (196 cm)
Weight235 lb (107 kg)
CollegeMississippi
High schoolNatchez (Natchez, Mississippi)
AFL draft1965 / Round: 3 / Pick: 22
(by the San Diego Chargers)
NFL draft1965 / Round: 3 / Pick: 38
Career history
As player
19661967Green Bay Packers
Career highlights and awards
Career stats
Receiving yards43
Receptions3
Receiving TDs0
Kicking yards13
Kick returns1
Games played19

Early years

He attended Natchez High School, where he was a three-sport athlete and almost chose Louisiana State University for college.[1]

Playing for Johnny Vaught at Ole Miss, Brown lettered three times (1962–64) and was a co-captain of the 1964 team. He was recognized as All-America by several publications for the 1964 season and was a first-team All-SEC selection his final two years. He was inducted into Ole Miss Athletic Hall of Fame in 1989 and the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame in 2010.[2] In 2004, Brown was honored by the Southeastern Conference as an SEC football legend.[3] He was honored with "Allen Brown Day" in his hometown.

Professional career

Brown was drafted by the Packers in the third round (38th overall) of the 1965 NFL Draft.[4] He was also drafted by the San Diego Chargers in the third round (22nd overall) of the 1965 American Football League Draft.[5] Brown signed with the Packers in December 1964. He missed the whole 1965 season with a dislocated shoulder.[1] Brown played five games in the 1966 season before injuring his knee. He played in every game in 1967, recording three receptions,[6] before he ruptured a kidney against the Pittsburgh Steelers in the final game. He retired the next spring.

Post-career life

Brown had two sons that played at Ole Miss as well, Timothy Brown and Burkes Brown. He is currently retired in Louisiana.

References

  1. ^ a b Bozeka, George (June 21, 2016). The 1966 Green Bay Packers: Profiles of Vince Lombardi's Super Bowl I Champions. McFarland. ISBN 9781476624426.
  2. ^ "Allen Brown". Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. November 1, 2012. Retrieved February 3, 2017.
  3. ^ "Former End Allen Brown Named To Legends Of SEC Football". Retrieved February 3, 2017.
  4. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/B/BrowAl00.htm
  5. ^ "1965 AFL Draft Transactions". www.prosportstransactions.com. Retrieved February 3, 2017.
  6. ^ "Allen Brown". NFL.com. Retrieved February 3, 2017.
Allen Brown (public servant)

Sir Allen Stanley Brown (3 July 1911 – 2 August 1999) was a senior Australian Public Servant. He was Secretary of the Prime Minister's Department between August 1949 and December 1958.

Allen W. Brown

Allen Webster Brown (1908-1990) was the fifth Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Albany in the United States from 1961 to 1974, during turbulent times from the 1960s to the drafting of the new Book of Common Prayer.

Caernarfon Castle

Caernarfon Castle (Welsh: Castell Caernarfon), often anglicized as Carnarvon Castle, is a medieval fortress in Caernarfon, Gwynedd, north-west Wales cared for by Cadw, the Welsh Government's historic environment service. It was a motte-and-bailey castle in the town of Caernarfon from the late 11th century until 1283 when King Edward I of England began replacing it with the current stone structure. The Edwardian town and castle acted as the administrative centre of north Wales and as a result the defences were built on a grand scale. There was a deliberate link with Caernarfon's Roman past and the Roman fort of Segontium is nearby.

While the castle was under construction, town walls were built around Caernarfon. The work cost between £20,000 and £25,000 from the start until the end of work in 1330. Despite Caernarfon Castle's external appearance of being mostly complete, the interior buildings no longer survive and many of the building plans were never finished. The town and castle were sacked in 1294 when Madog ap Llywelyn led a rebellion against the English. Caernarfon was recaptured the following year. During the Glyndŵr Rising of 1400–1415, the castle was besieged. When the Tudor dynasty ascended to the English throne in 1485, tensions between the Welsh and English began to diminish and castles were considered less important. As a result, Caernarfon Castle was allowed to fall into a state of disrepair. Despite its dilapidated condition, during the English Civil War Caernarfon Castle was held by Royalists, and was besieged three times by Parliamentarian forces. This was the last time the castle was used in war. Caernarfon Castle was neglected until the 19th century when the state funded repairs. In 1911, Caernarfon Castle was used for the investiture of the Prince of Wales, and again in 1969. It is part of the World Heritage Site "Castles and Town Walls of King Edward in Gwynedd".

Castle

A castle (from Latin: castellum) is a type of fortified structure built during the Middle Ages by predominantly the nobility or royalty and by military orders. Scholars debate the scope of the word castle, but usually consider it to be the private fortified residence of a lord or noble. This is distinct from a palace, which is not fortified; from a fortress, which was not always a residence for royalty or nobility; and from a fortified settlement, which was a public defence – though there are many similarities among these types of construction. Usage of the term has varied over time and has been applied to structures as diverse as hill forts and country houses. Over the approximately 900 years that castles were built, they took on a great many forms with many different features, although some, such as curtain walls and arrowslits, were commonplace.

European-style castles originated in the 9th and 10th centuries, after the fall of the Carolingian Empire resulted in its territory being divided among individual lords and princes. These nobles built castles to control the area immediately surrounding them and the castles were both offensive and defensive structures; they provided a base from which raids could be launched as well as offered protection from enemies. Although their military origins are often emphasised in castle studies, the structures also served as centres of administration and symbols of power. Urban castles were used to control the local populace and important travel routes, and rural castles were often situated near features that were integral to life in the community, such as mills, fertile land, or a water source.

Many castles were originally built from earth and timber, but had their defences replaced later by stone. Early castles often exploited natural defences, lacking features such as towers and arrowslits and relying on a central keep. In the late 12th and early 13th centuries, a scientific approach to castle defence emerged. This led to the proliferation of towers, with an emphasis on flanking fire. Many new castles were polygonal or relied on concentric defence – several stages of defence within each other that could all function at the same time to maximise the castle's firepower. These changes in defence have been attributed to a mixture of castle technology from the Crusades, such as concentric fortification, and inspiration from earlier defences, such as Roman forts. Not all the elements of castle architecture were military in nature, so that devices such as moats evolved from their original purpose of defence into symbols of power. Some grand castles had long winding approaches intended to impress and dominate their landscape.

Although gunpowder was introduced to Europe in the 14th century, it did not significantly affect castle building until the 15th century, when artillery became powerful enough to break through stone walls. While castles continued to be built well into the 16th century, new techniques to deal with improved cannon fire made them uncomfortable and undesirable places to live. As a result, true castles went into decline and were replaced by artillery forts with no role in civil administration, and country houses that were indefensible. From the 18th century onwards, there was a renewed interest in castles with the construction of mock castles, part of a romantic revival of Gothic architecture, but they had no military purpose.

Château Gaillard

Château Gaillard ("Strong Castle") is a ruined medieval castle, located 90 metres (300 ft) above the commune of Les Andelys overlooking the River Seine, in the Eure département of Normandy, France. It is located some 95 kilometres (59 mi) north-west of Paris and 40 kilometres (25 mi) from Rouen. Construction began in 1196 under the auspices of Richard the Lionheart, who was simultaneously King of England and feudal Duke of Normandy. The castle was expensive to build, but the majority of the work was done in an unusually short period of time. It took just two years and, at the same time, the town of Petit Andely was constructed. Château Gaillard has a complex and advanced design, and uses early principles of concentric fortification; it was also one of the earliest European castles to use machicolations. The castle consists of three enclosures separated by dry moats, with a keep in the inner enclosure.

Château Gaillard was captured in 1204 by the king of France, Philip II, after a lengthy siege. In the mid-14th century, the castle was the residence of the exiled David II of Scotland. The castle changed hands several times in the Hundred Years' War, but in 1449 the French king captured Château Gaillard from the English king definitively, and from then on it remained in French ownership. Henry IV of France ordered the demolition of Château Gaillard in 1599; although it was in ruins at the time, it was felt to be a threat to the security of the local population. The castle ruins are listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture. The inner bailey is open to the public from March to November, and the outer baileys are open all year.

Electoral history of William Henry Harrison

Electoral history of William Henry Harrison, 9th President of the United States (1841); United States Minister to Gran Colombia (1828–1829); United States Senator from Ohio (1825–1828); Ohioan Representative (1816–1819) and Governor of the Indiana Territory (1801–1812).

Ethan Allen Brown

Ethan Allen Brown (July 4, 1776 – February 24, 1852) was a Democratic-Republican politician. He served as the seventh Governor of Ohio.

Fulk IV, Count of Anjou

Fulk IV (in French Foulques IV) (1043–14 April 1109), called le Réchin, was the Count of Anjou from 1068 until his death. The nickname by which he is usually referred has no certain translation. Philologists have made numerous very different suggestions, including "quarreler", "rude", "sullen", "surly" and "heroic". He was noted to be "a man with many reprehensible, even scandalous, habits" by Orderic Vitalis.

Gary Brown (baseball)

Gary Allen Brown (born September 9, 1988) is an American former professional baseball outfielder. He made his Major League Baseball (MLB) debut with the San Francisco Giants in 2014.

Graeme Brown

Graeme Allen Brown OAM (born 9 April 1979) was a professional cyclist and is a dual Olympic gold medallist from Australia. He last rode for UCI Pro Continental team Drapac Cannondale Holistic Development Team.

Gunnar Nilsson

Gunnar Axel Arvid Nilsson (20 November 1948 – 20 October 1978) was a Swedish racing driver. Before entering Formula One, he won the 1975 British Formula 3 Championship.

Nilsson entered 32 Formula One Grand Prix races, qualifying for all of them. He won the 1977 Belgian Grand Prix at Zolder while driving for Team Lotus. After losing his Lotus seat, he signed for Arrows for 1978, but was later diagnosed with testicular cancer which meant he could not drive the car. However, he did compete in three International Race of Champions (IROC) races in 1977. He had two sixth-place finishes and a fifth-place finish.As soon as the cancer was determined to be terminal, he created the Gunnar Nilsson Cancer Foundation. He died in October 1978.

Gunnar Nilsson is buried in Pålsjö cemetery in Helsingborg, Sweden, close to his parents Arvid and Elisabeth Nilsson.

Kane Brown

Kane Allen Brown (born October 21, 1993) is an American country music singer and songwriter who first came to the attention of the public through social media. He released his first EP, titled Closer, in June 2015. A new single, "Used to Love You Sober", was released in October 2015. After Brown signed with RCA Nashville in early 2016, this song was included on his EP Chapter 1, which was released in March 2016. He released his first full-length album, the self-titled Kane Brown, on December 2, 2016. The single "What Ifs" was released from this album and, in October 2017, Brown became the first artist to have simultaneous number ones on all five main Billboard's country charts. Brown released his second album, Experiment, in November 2018.

Outlaw (War album)

Outlaw is an album by War, released on RCA Victor Records in 1982.

This was War's first album for RCA. Between this and the previous album on MCA, War released a single on LA Records, a company owned by their producer Jerry Goldstein: "Cinco de Mayo", which also appears on Outlaw, backed with "Don't Let No One Get You Down", an older track from Why Can't We Be Friends? (1975).

Alice Tweed Smith (vocals) had left the band since their previous album, reducing the group to eight members, although the cover only shows seven. Pat Rizzo isn't on cover picture. Assuming that composer credits indicate the lineup of each track (excluding producer Jerry Goldstein); on some tracks, Ron Hammon (drums) and Pat Rizzo (saxophone) are not credited .

Three more singles from the album were issued on RCA Victor: "You Got the Power" backed with "Cinco de Mayo", "Outlaw" backed with "I'm About Somebody", and "Just Because" backed with "The Jungle (medley)". Also, "Baby It's Cold Outside" (not the popular 1940s song by Frank Loesser) was issued as a promotional single for seasonal music radio programming. Therefore, every track on the album was also issued on a single, though some were probably edited.

The album was re-released on CD in 1995 with a different running order and the extended version of "Cinco de Mayo" added as a bonus track.

Richard I of England

Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 1189 until his death. He also ruled as Duke of Normandy, Aquitaine and Gascony, Lord of Cyprus, Count of Poitiers, Anjou, Maine, and Nantes, and was overlord of Brittany at various times during the same period. He was the third of five sons of King Henry II of England and Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine. He was known as Richard Cœur de Lion or Richard the Lionheart because of his reputation as a great military leader and warrior. He was also known in Occitan as: Oc e No (English: Yes and No), because of his reputation for terseness.By the age of 16, Richard had taken command of his own army, putting down rebellions in Poitou against his father. Richard was a central Christian commander during the Third Crusade, leading the campaign after the departure of Philip II of France and achieving considerable victories against his Muslim counterpart, Saladin, although he did not retake Jerusalem from Saladin.Richard spoke both French and Occitan. He was born in England, where he spent his childhood; before becoming king, however, he lived most of his adult life in the Duchy of Aquitaine, in the southwest of France. Following his accession, he spent very little time, perhaps as little as six months, in England. Most of his life as king was spent on Crusade, in captivity, or actively defending his lands in France. Rather than regarding his kingdom as a responsibility requiring his presence as ruler, he has been perceived as preferring to use it merely as a source of revenue to support his armies. Nevertheless, he was seen as a pious hero by his subjects. He remains one of the few kings of England remembered by his epithet, rather than regnal number, and is an enduring iconic figure both in England and in France.

Sterling Allen Brown

Sterling Allen Brown (May 1, 1901 – January 13, 1989) was a black professor, folklorist, poet, literary critic, and first Poet Laureate of the District of Columbia. He chiefly studied black culture of the Southern United States and was a full professor at Howard University for most of his career. He was a visiting professor at several other notable institutions, including Vassar College, New York University (NYU), Atlanta University, and Yale University.

Thomas Worthington (governor)

Thomas Worthington (July 16, 1773 – June 20, 1827) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. He served as the sixth Governor of Ohio.

Timothy Brown (actor)

Thomas Allen Brown (born May 24, 1937), known also as Timothy Brown and Timmy Brown, is an American singer, former professional American football player, and actor.

Tower of London

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins), although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under Kings Richard I, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.

The Tower of London has played a prominent role in English history. It was besieged several times, and controlling it has been important to controlling the country. The Tower has served variously as an armoury, a treasury, a menagerie, the home of the Royal Mint, a public record office, and the home of the Crown Jewels of England. From the early 14th century until the reign of Charles II, a procession would be led from the Tower to Westminster Abbey on the coronation of a monarch. In the absence of the monarch, the Constable of the Tower is in charge of the castle. This was a powerful and trusted position in the medieval period. In the late 15th century, the castle was the prison of the Princes in the Tower. Under the Tudors, the Tower became used less as a royal residence, and despite attempts to refortify and repair the castle, its defences lagged behind developments to deal with artillery.

The peak period of the castle's use as a prison was the 16th and 17th centuries, when many figures who had fallen into disgrace, such as Elizabeth I before she became queen, Sir Walter Raleigh, and Elizabeth Throckmorton, were held within its walls. This use has led to the phrase "sent to the Tower". Despite its enduring reputation as a place of torture and death, popularised by 16th-century religious propagandists and 19th-century writers, only seven people were executed within the Tower before the World Wars of the 20th century. Executions were more commonly held on the notorious Tower Hill to the north of the castle, with 112 occurring there over a 400-year period. In the latter half of the 19th century, institutions such as the Royal Mint moved out of the castle to other locations, leaving many buildings empty. Anthony Salvin and John Taylor took the opportunity to restore the Tower to what was felt to be its medieval appearance, clearing out many of the vacant post-medieval structures. In the First and Second World Wars, the Tower was again used as a prison and witnessed the executions of 12 men for espionage. After the Second World War, damage caused during the Blitz was repaired, and the castle reopened to the public. Today, the Tower of London is one of the country's most popular tourist attractions. Under the ceremonial charge of the Constable of the Tower, and operated by the Resident Governor of the Tower of London and Keeper of the Jewel House, the property is cared for by the charity Historic Royal Palaces and is protected as a World Heritage Site.

White Tower (Tower of London)

The White Tower is a central tower, the old keep, at the Tower of London. It was built by William the Conqueror during the early 1080s, and subsequently extended. The White Tower was the castle's strongest point militarily, and provided accommodation for the king and his representatives, as well as a chapel. Henry III ordered the tower whitewashed in 1240.

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