All-purpose yardage

All-purpose yards or all-purpose yardage is an American football and Canadian football statistical measure. It is virtually the same as the statistic that some football leagues refer to as combined net yards.[1] In the game of football, progress is measured by advancing the football towards the opposing team's goal line. Progress can be made during play by the offensive team by advancing the ball from its point of progress at the start of play known as the line of scrimmage or by the defensive team after taking possession of the football via a change of possession (such as punt, kickoff, interception, punt block, blocked kick or fumble). When the offensive team advances the ball by rushing the football, the player who carries the ball is given credit for the difference in progress measured in rushing yards. When the offensive team advances the ball by pass reception, the player who catches the reception is given credit for the difference in progress measured in reception yards. Although the ball may also be advanced by penalty, these yards are not considered all-purpose yards. Progress lost via quarterback sacks is classified variously. Thus, all-purpose yards is a combined total of rushing yards, receiving yards, and all forms of return yards only. Some sources do not specify which types of return yards count toward this total because the most common forms of return yards are kick and punt return yards.[2]

Football associations differ on their own specific definitions of the term. The National Collegiate Athletic Association, for example, defines the term as "the combined net yards gained by rushing, receiving, interception (and fumble) returns, punt returns, kickoff returns and runbacks of field goal attempts. All-purpose yardage does not include forward passing yardage" (at pg. 206).[3] The National Football League (NFL), however, defines combined net yards as "Rushing, receiving, interception returns, punt returns, kickoff returns, and fumble returns".[4] Neither of these totals makes clear how they record yards from blocked punts recovered, blocked field goals, and missed field goal returns.

Records by league

NCAA

Brian Westbrook holds the NCAA all-division record for career all-purpose yards,[5][6][7][8] while Christian McCaffrey holds the single-season record.[9][10]

NFL

Jerry Rice holds the NFL career combined net yards record with 23,546 yards,[4] while Darren Sproles set a new single-season record in the 2011 season with 2,696 yards.[11]

CFL

Pinball Clemons holds the Canadian Football League (CFL) record for career all-purpose yardage with 25,396 yards which also set a professional football record,[12] while Chad Owens set a new single-season record during the 2012 season with 3,863 yards, which also set a new professional football record.[13] On 27 October 2017, in a game against the Hamilton Tiger-Cats, Diontae Spencer set a new CFL single-game record with 496 all-purpose yards: 133 yards receiving, 165 kick-off return yards and 169 punt return yards.[14]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Top 20 Combined Net Yards". Pro Football Hall of Fame. 22 February 2006. Retrieved 2 January 2008.
  2. ^ "All-Purpose Yards". Information Please Database. Pearson Education, Inc. 2007. Retrieved 2 January 2008.
  3. ^ "Official 2007 NCAA Division I Football Record Book" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 December 2007. Retrieved 3 January 2008.
  4. ^ a b "Individual Records: Combined Yardage". NFL Enterprises LLC. Archived from the original on 9 January 2008. Retrieved 3 January 2008.
  5. ^ "2012 NCAA Football Records – Division III Individual Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 5. Retrieved 8 February 2013.
  6. ^ "2012 NCAA Football Records – FCS Individual Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 3. Retrieved 8 February 2013.
  7. ^ "2012 NCAA Football Records – FBS Individual Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 4. Retrieved 8 February 2013.
  8. ^ "2012 NCAA Football Records – Division II Individual Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 12. Retrieved 8 February 2013.
  9. ^ Miller, Ted (5 December 2015). "Christian McCaffrey does everything, including break Barry Sanders' record". ESPN. Retrieved 10 December 2015.
  10. ^ In order to confirm NCAA records, one must examine all four official NCAA record books—FBS, FCS, Division II, and Division III.
  11. ^ "NFL.com news: Brees, Saints continue assault on offensive records". NFL.com. 1 January 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  12. ^ "Pinball Clemons". Canadian Football Hall of Fame.
  13. ^ http://www.cbc.ca/sports/football/cfl/story/2012/11/01/sp-cfl-hamilton-tiger-cats-toronto-argonauts-recap.html
  14. ^ Dunk, Justin (28 October 2017). "Diontae Spencer will give jersey from record-breaking game to mom - 3DownNation". 3DownNation. Retrieved 28 October 2017.
All-purpose

All-purpose may refer to:

All-purpose cleaner, such as hard-surface cleaner

All-purpose flour

All-purpose Lightweight Individual Carrying Equipment (ALICE), United States Army standard system of load-carrying equipment

All-purpose programming language, such as BASIC (Beginners All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) and Perl

All-purpose road, in the United Kingdom, any road that is not a special road

All-purpose room, such as a family room or living room

All-purpose yardage, in American football

Barry Wagner

Barry Wagner (born November 24, 1967) is a retired American football player in the Arena Football League for the Orlando Predators, with whom he won his first ArenaBowl Championship, and the San Jose SaberCats, with whom he won two championships. He also played in the World Indoor Football League as a wide receiver/defensive back with the Daytona Beach Thunder. Wagner is the all-time AFL all-purpose yardage leader. He is considered the best Arena Football player of all time. During the 2012 Arena Football League season, Wagner was named the league's greatest player of all time.

Brian Mitchell (American football)

Brian Keith Mitchell (born August 18, 1968) is a former American football running back and return specialist in the National Football League. He was originally drafted by the Washington Redskins in the fifth round (130th overall) of the 1990 NFL Draft. He played college football at University of Southwestern Louisiana where he was a quarterback. Mitchell is considered one of the greatest return specialists in NFL history.Mitchell also played for the Philadelphia Eagles and the New York Giants. He is currently second on the NFL's all-time list in all-purpose yardage with 23,330 yards, behind Jerry Rice. He is also first all-time for combined yardage for a non-wide receiver. His 13 special teams touchdowns are second in NFL history, behind Devin Hester, and his nine punt return touchdowns are third behind Eric Metcalf with 10, and Hester with 14. Mitchell was ranked the second greatest specialist in NFL history by NFL Network's NFL Top 10 Return Aces.

D. J. Foster

Darryll James "D. J." Foster (born November 22, 1993) is an American football running back for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Arizona State University. He signed with the New England Patriots as an undrafted free agent in 2016. He was a member of the Super Bowl LI winning Patriots, though was inactive for the game itself.

Damaris Johnson

Damaris Keith Johnson (born November 22, 1989) is a former American football wide receiver and return specialist for the BC Lions of the Canadian Football League (CFL). After playing college football for the Tulsa Golden Hurricane, he was signed by the Philadelphia Eagles as an undrafted free agent in 2012.

Darren Sproles

Darren Lee Sproles (born June 20, 1983) is a former American football running back and return specialist for the of the National Football League. He played college football at Kansas State, where he is the all-time leading rusher, and was drafted by the San Diego Chargers in the fourth round of the 2005 NFL Draft.

Sproles was named as a kick returner on the Chargers 50th Anniversary Team. He joined the New Orleans Saints in free agency before the 2011 season, and broke the NFL record for most single-season all-purpose yardage the same year, with 2,696 yards. During that season, he set career highs with 603 yards rushing (6.9 yards per carry) and 710 yards receiving and a combined total of 9 touchdowns. Sproles is the first player in NFL history with 2,200+ all purpose yards in 4 different seasons (2008–2011). Sproles is currently ranked 6th in career all-purpose yards in NFL history (19,020 yards).

Kentucky Wildcats football statistical leaders

The Kentucky Wildcats football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Kentucky Wildcats football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, all-purpose yardage, defensive stats, kicking, and scoring. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Wildcats represent the University of Kentucky in the NCAA's Southeastern Conference.

Although Kentucky began competing in intercollegiate football in 1892, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1946. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists. For example, Cecil Tuttle rushed for 6 touchdowns against Maryland in 1907, but complete records for the era are unavailable.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1950, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Wildcats have played in eight bowl games since this decision, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Kevin Richardson (American football)

Kevin Lamont Richardson (born May 15, 1986) is an American former starting running back for the Appalachian State Mountaineers for the 2005–2007 seasons. He holds school records for the most career rushing yards (4,804), the most rushing yards in a single season (1,676 in 2006), the highest career all-purpose yardage (6,104), and the most rushing touchdowns in a single season (30 in 2006). Richardson was a key contributor to three seasons of unprecedented success for the Mountaineers. He scored multiple touchdowns in all three of the team's FCS championship victories, and he rushed for 88 yards in the Mountaineers' 34–32 upset victory over the then #5 Michigan Wolverines of the Football Bowl Subdivision.

Larry Key

Larry Key (born July 12, 1956 in Inverness, Florida) was a Canadian Football League running back for the British Columbia Lions from 1978 through 1982. He was an All-Star in 1979 and 1981.

Key was the first Florida State Seminoles player to rush for 1,000 yards when he gained 1,117 in 1977. His 97-yard run in a 1976 game against VPI is the record for the longest run ever by a Seminole. Key also set four kick return records and was the national leader in all-purpose yardage in 1977. He was inducted into the FSU Football Hall of Fame in 1984.

Lionel James

Lionel "Little Train" James (born May 25, 1962) is a former professional American football player who was selected by the San Diego Chargers in the 5th round of the 1984 NFL Draft. Undersized at 5 feet 6 inches (1.68 m) and 171 pounds (78 kg), James played running back at Auburn University where he shared the backfield with Bo Jackson. James would be a part of the 1983 SEC Champion and Sugar Bowl champion team. He spent his entire 5-year NFL career with the Chargers from 1984-1988. His best year as a pro came during the 1985 season when he set the then-NFL season records for receiving yards by a running back and all-purpose yardage. He also led the AFC in receptions that year.

In 1985, James set the NFL record for all purpose yards in a season with 2,535 yards. He also set the record for receiving yards by a running back with 1,027 yards, while also leading the AFC in receptions with 86. On November 10, 1985, he had his best day as a pro versus the Los Angeles Raiders. He gained 345 all-purpose yards including a career best 168 yards receiving and scored the winning touchdown in a 40–34 overtime victory. The total yardage was second at the time only to the 373 yards by Billy Cannon in 1961, and remains a Chargers franchise record. He might have broken the record in an earlier game that season against the Cincinnati Bengals except for a Chargers penalty that cost him 89 yards of a 100-yard kickoff return. James finished that game with 316 yards.James record for receiving yards by a running back was broken by Marshall Faulk (1,048) in 1999, and his all purpose yardage record was eclipsed in 2000 by Derrick Mason (2,690 yards).

Mississippi State Bulldogs football statistical leaders

The Mississippi State Bulldogs football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Mississippi State Bulldogs football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, total offense, all-purpose yardage, receiving, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season and career leaders. The Bulldogs represent Mississippi State University in the NCAA's Southeastern Conference.

Although Mississippi State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1895, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1950. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists. For example, Harry Furman rushed for 7 touchdowns twice in the 1907 season, but complete records for the season are unavailable.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1955, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Bulldogs have played in 10 bowl games since then.

Each of recent head coach Dan Mullen's nine seasons (2009-17) rank in the Bulldogs' 10 highest in total offensive output. Indeed, all but two of 30 offensive lists displayed below have a Mullen-era player in sole possession or tied for the top spot.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Muffed punt

In gridiron football, a muffed punt is defined as "touching of the ball prior to possessing the ball.”

A muffed punt occurs when there is an "uncontrolled touch" of the football by a player on the returning team after it is punted. This can occur when:

The kicking team interferes with the other team's right to catch the punt

A player on the kicking team is struck unaware by the football running down-field to cover the punt.

A player attempts to return the ball, makes contact with it but cannot retain the ball in his hands and it comes loose.

To be a fumble, the receiving team must possess the football, then lose control. In the case of a fumble, the ball is live and can be returned by the team that recovers the ball. In the case of a muffed punt, it is possible for the punting team to recover the ball and continue the drive, but at least in NCAA and NFL rules, they cannot advance the ball on that same play. Rules vary by league about how to handle a muffed punt.

Nonetheless, a muffed punt is a turnover. In the NFL, a muffed punt recovered by the kicking team cannot be challenged by a coach for review because all turnovers are automatically reviewed.

San Diego State Aztecs football statistical leaders

The San Diego State Aztecs football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the San Diego State Aztecs football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, all-purpose yardage, defensive stats, kicking, and scoring. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Aztecs represent San Diego State University in the NCAA's Mountain West Conference (MW).

Although San Diego State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1921, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1947. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1947, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

Additionally, San Diego State has been grouped in the same MW football division as Hawaii since divisional play began in 2013, meaning that it plays at Hawaii every other year. This is relevant because the NCAA allows teams that play at Hawaii in a given season to schedule 13 regular-season games instead of the normal 12. However, the Aztecs have not chosen to do so in any season since the start of divisional play.

Since 2013, the MW has held a conference championship game. The Aztecs have appeared in this game twice (2015 and 2016), giving players in those seasons an extra game to accumulate statistics.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Aztecs have played in eight bowl games since this decision (all since 2010), giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2017 season. Of particular note is running back Donnel Pumphrey, who leads the entire Division I FBS in rushing yards.

South Florida Bulls football statistical leaders

The South Florida Bulls football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the South Florida Bulls football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, all-purpose yardage, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Bulls represent the University of South Florida in the NCAA's American Athletic Conference.

South Florida began competing in intercollegiate football in 1997, so the typical issues with school records do not exist. There is no period of the late 19th and early 20th century with spotty, incomplete records. Also, the Bulls' records are also not affected by the 1972 NCAA decision to allow freshmen to play varsity football or the 2002 NCAA decision to count bowl games in players' official statistics. One minor issue is that the Bulls played their first four seasons in Division I-AA, now known as Division I FCS, which limits teams to 11 regular-season games (in most years) instead of the 12 that have been allowed in Division I FBS throughout USF's football history.

The lists below are updated through Week 13 of the 2018 season.

Stanford Cardinal football statistical leaders

The Stanford Cardinal football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Stanford Cardinal football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, all-purpose yardage, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Cardinal represent Stanford University in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference.

Although Stanford began competing in intercollegiate football in 1891, the school's official record book generally does not lists players from before the 1940s, as records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1940s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. Stanford has played in a bowl game nine times since this decision, allowing players in these years (2009 through 2017) an extra game to accumulate statistics. Similarly, the Cardinal have appeared in the Pac-12 Championship Game four times since it began in 2011.

The top nine seasons in Stanford history in both total offensive yards and points scored have all come since 1999.These lists are updated through Stanford's game against Oregon on September 22, 2018.

Tim McCray

Tim McCray (born August 20, 1960 in Waycross, Georgia) was a Canadian Football League running back for the Ottawa Rough Riders from 1984 through 1985, and for the Saskatchewan Roughriders in 1986 through 1990. He was an All-Star in 1989, the same year the Roughriders won the 77th Grey Cup.

In 1989, Tim won his first Grey Cup and was selected to the All-West and All-CFL All-Star team for the first time. He established career highs in all offensive categories as well as leading the CFL and breaking the Riders record for all-purpose yardage in the season with 2,684 yards. Tim, became the sixth Roughrider to break the 1,000 rushing yard mark with 1,285 yards rushing. Tim placed second on the club with 75 receptions for 749 yards. Tim also led the Riders in kick-off returns with 650 yards on 29 returns for a 22.4 average. Tim was the 1989 Saskatchewan Roughriders Molson Cup winner as selected by the fans as the most Popular Player. Tim signed with Buffalo in the NFL in 1984.

Warren Norman

Warren Norman (born December 30, 1990) was an American football player for the Vanderbilt Commodores. Norman was the 2009 Southeastern Conference Freshman Player of the Year according to the Associated Press and the SEC Head Coaches.In the 2009 season, Norman broke Herschel Walker's SEC single-season freshman all-purpose yardage record, which Walker had held for 29 years. Norman had 1,941 all-purpose yards during the 2009 season. Also in the 2009 season, Norman tied for the Southeastern Conference (SEC) record for most kickoff returns for touchdowns in one season at three. He shares the record with Willie Gault of the University of Tennessee (1979–1982).

Norman, from Stone Mountain, Georgia, near Atlanta, attended and played athletics for Chamblee High School. In his senior year, he was named First Team All-Region 5-AAA and All-DeKalb County Running Back. In that season, he rushed for over 1,000 yards. In his junior year, he was recognized as All-State after rushing for more than 1,500 yards and 28 TDs and leading his team to a 12-2 record and the 5A state semifinals. That year, he had five touchdowns in one playoff game.

Chamblee High School Head Football Coach Mike Collins describes Norman's football skills: "On the field, Warren is a physical running back with the type of speed that can be hard to contain on the outside. He's a guy that runs through tackles, a hard guy to bring down. He also has great hands out of the backfield catching the football."

West Virginia Mountaineers football statistical leaders

The West Virginia Mountaineers football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the West Virginia Mountaineers football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, all-purpose yardage, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Mountaineers represent West Virginia University in the NCAA's Big 12 Conference.

Although West Virginia began competing in intercollegiate football in 1891, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1933. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists. However, the West Virginia Football Media Guide does include the touchdown statistics, although not the yards, of Ira Errett Rodgers, who played for the Mountaineers from 1915 to 1919.These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1933, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Mountaineers have played in 14 bowl games since the decision, with a 15th now assured in 2018, giving players an extra game to accumulate statistics.

The Mountaineers ran a high-octane spread option offense under head coaches Rich Rodriguez (2001-2007) and Bill Stewart (2008-2010), which emphasized mobile quarterbacks and no huddling, allowing the teams to rack up very large numbers of yards. Since Dana Holgorsen took over in 2011, the Mountaineers have run more of an air raid spread attack, emphasizing passing on most plays. This has led to many school passing and receiving records being set. In particular, a 70–63 win over Baylor in 2012 saw more than 1,500 offensive yards between the two teams combined, and 10 single-game entries on the lists below.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 regular season.

Willie Gault

Willie James Gault (born September 5, 1960) is a former American football wide receiver and Olympic athlete. He played in the National Football League for 11 seasons for the Chicago Bears and Los Angeles Raiders. Considered one of the fastest NFL players of all-time, Gault was a member of the Bears team that won Super Bowl XX, and was also a member of the U.S. Olympic team that boycotted the 1980 Olympics.

Gault played college football at the University of Tennessee from 1979 to 1982. He led the Vols in all-purpose yardage as a sophomore, junior and senior, and was named to the All-American team in 1982. He still holds numerous school kickoff return records.Gault is currently pursuing a career as an actor. He also remains active in masters athletics, setting world masters records in the 100-meter and 200-meter dashes for the 45–49, 50–54 and 55–59 age groups.

Codes
Levels of play
Field
Scoring
Turnovers
Downs
Play clock
Statistics
Practice
Officiating
Miscellaneous

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.