All-Pro

All-Pro is an honor bestowed upon professional American football players that designates the best player at each position during a given season. All-Pro players are typically selected by press organizations, who select an "All-Pro team," a list that consists of at least 22 players, one for each offensive and defensive position, plus various special teams players depending on the press organization that compiles the list. All-Pro lists are exclusively limited to the major leagues, usually only the National Football League; in the past, other leagues recognized as major, such as the American Football League of the 1960s or the All-America Football Conference of the 1940s, have been included in All-Pro lists.

Beginning in the early 1920s, All-Pro teams have traditionally been assembled from press polls of individually voting sportswriters.[1] After polling the writers, the votes are tallied to determine the selected players and the results have historically been published through various news syndicates. Today, the teams are mostly published online or announced on various televised sports programs. Some organizations publish two All-Pro lists, a "First Team" and a "Second Team," with the first consisting of more prominent players than the second.

The Associated Press (AP) and its All-Pro selections are the most widely recognized today.[2][3] Other polls include the United Press International All-Pro poll, which began in the 1940s and continued in various forms until 1997, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team, which ran from 1954 until 1996, and the Pro Football Writers Association All-Pro teams, which were inaugurated in 1966 and continue to be released annually. The NFL itself compiled official All-Pro lists beginning in 1931 but abandoned the practice in 1942.

The All-Pro designation, while not officially sanctioned by the NFL, is generally considered a more prestigious honor than the NFL's official all-star designation, a Pro Bowl recognition: a minimum of twice as many Pro Bowlers are selected as first and second team All-Pro slots combined, and Pro Bowl selections often drop out, allowing a lesser player to also receive the honor by default, which does not occur with the All-Pro list.[4]

Associated Press

The AP began selecting All-Pros in 1940, and is the longest running annual selector of the top NFL players.[5][6] The All-Pro Team is an annual selection of the best players in the NFL by position as selected by a national panel of AP media members. Unlike selection to the Pro Bowls, votes are cast for outstanding players by position without consideration for whether the player competes in the American Football Conference (AFC) or National Football Conference (NFC).

The first team consists of the top one or two players at each position; the second team consists of the runners-up at each position. One player is selected at quarterback, fullback, tight end, center, punter, place kicker, and kick returner, while two players are selected at running back, wide receiver, offensive tackle, offensive guard, outside linebacker, inside/middle linebacker, defensive end, defensive tackle, cornerback, and safety. In 2016, for the first time, the AP picked specific positions on the offensive line, a "flex" player on offense, and a fifth defensive back.[7]

The AP claims that the selection panel is national one, but some NFL media markets such as Detroit, a city that has had an NFL team since 1934, do not have a vote.[8]

The Sporting News

The Sporting News published All-Conference teams beginning in the 1950s. In 1980 it began choosing an All-Pro team, rather than two All-Conference teams. Since its teams are published in Total Football: The Official Encyclopedia of the NFL, they are recognized by the NFL and the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Newspaper Enterprise Association

The Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team was different from the press polls. It was created by Murray Olderman in 1954 purporting to be the "Players' All-Pro Team" as it was a poll of NFL players themselves.[9] This poll was last published in 1997.

Pro Football Writers Association

The PFWA All-NFL Team was inaugurated in 1966 and is still released each year. A press poll of the members of the Pro Football Writers Association, it has been released since the 1990s in Pro Football Weekly. Additionally, the editors and writers of Pro Football Weekly have personally selected All-AFC and All-NFC teams since 1970.

United Press International

Also a press poll, it began in the 1930s and continued until 1969. In 1970 UPI began selecting All-AFC and All-NFC teams, which ran through 1996.

Other selectors

Past

Present

See also

References

  1. ^ Gill, Bob (2000). "All-Pros from the Detroit News, 1958-72, Part 1" (PDF). The Coffin Corner. 22 (2). Pro Football Researchers Association. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 9, 2016.
  2. ^ Smith, Michael David (January 8, 2016). "Associated Press will re-examine the makeup of All-Pro teams". Pro Football Talk. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016.
  3. ^ Wywrot, Chrissie (January 24, 2011). "Suh Named to AP All-Pro Team". DetroitLions.com. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016.
  4. ^ Rothstein, Michael (January 8, 2016). "Lions DE Ezekiel Ansah named to AP All-Pro second team". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016.
  5. ^ a b Goska, Eric (2004). Green Bay Packers - A Measure of Greatness. Krause Publications. p. 441. ISBN 9780873499200. Retrieved February 7, 2016.
  6. ^ "Jake Long Named Associated Press All-Pro". miami.cbslocal.com. January 25, 2011. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016.
  7. ^ Lynch, Andrew (January 6, 2017). "Ezekiel Elliott leads 2016 NFL All-Pro team's 17 first-time selections". Fox Sports. Retrieved May 3, 2017.
  8. ^ O'Hara, Mike. "Why Calvin Johnson wasn't a unanimous All-Pro selection". detroitlions.com. Retrieved January 14, 2013.
  9. ^ "East, West Divide Honors on Players' All-NFL". The Corpus Christi Caller-Times. Newspaper Enterprise Association. December 20, 1960. p. 21. Retrieved January 29, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ Hogrogian, John (1982). "All-Pros of the Early NFL" (PDF). The Coffin Corner. 4 (11). Pro Football Researchers Association. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 9, 2016.
  11. ^ Hogrogian, John (1984). "1920 All-Pros" (PDF). The Coffin Corner. Pro Football Researchers Association. 6 (1). Archived from the original on August 8, 2014. Retrieved May 3, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
2016 All-Pro Team

The 2016 All-Pro teams were named by the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2016 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2017 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book and also part of the language of the 2011 NFLPA Collective Bargaining Agreement. Any player selected to the first-team of any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro." The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers and broadcasters. For the first time, the nationwide panel of 60 sports writers and broadcasters who regularly cover the NFL voted for specific positions on the offensive line, a "flex" player on offense, a fifth defensive back, and a punt returner and special teamer. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and will be released at a later date. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

2018 All-Pro Team

The 2018 All-Pro teams were named by the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2018 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2019 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book and also part of the language of the 2011 NFLPA Collective Bargaining Agreement. Any player selected to the first-team of any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro." The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers and broadcasters. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and will be released at a later date. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

All Pro Wrestling

All Pro Wrestling is an American professional wrestling promotion and training school, based in Hayward, California, USA. The company was founded by Roland Alexander and managed by him until his death on November 5, 2013. It is located 45 miles southeast of San Francisco, 15 miles south of Oakland, and 35 miles north of San Jose.

B-Boy

Benito "Benny" Cuntapay (born December 29, 1978) is an American professional wrestler better known by his ring name, B-Boy. He is best known for his work in the independent circuit, where he worked in promotions like Combat Zone Wrestling (CZW), Pro Wrestling Guerrilla (PWG), Jersey All Pro Wrestling (JAPW) or Wrestling Society X (WSX). He is a CZW World Heavyweight Champion, one-time CZW Iron Man Champion and three-times PWG World Tag Team Champion (once with Homicide and twice with Super Dragon). He also won the CZW 2003 Best of the Best tournament and the PWG 2004 Tango & Cash Invitational tournament with Homicide. He also wrestled as Bael for Lucha Underground, but was killed by Matanza as part of the storyline.

BI-LO 200

The BI-LO 200 is a discontinued NASCAR Busch Series event held from 1983 to 2004 as an accompanying race to the Southern 500. When the Southern 500 was dropped from the schedule and Darlington's Busch Series schedule was reduced to one race, this race was removed in favor of the O'Reilly Auto Parts Challenge at Texas Motor Speedway because of the Ferko lawsuit.

Mark Martin led all drivers in race wins with five. Only two other drivers, Harry Gant and Jeff Burton, won multiple BI-LO 200s, with both drivers winning three times.

Baltimore Ravens

The Baltimore Ravens are a professional American football team based in Baltimore, Maryland. The Ravens compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the American Football Conference (AFC) North division. The team plays its home games at M&T Bank Stadium and is headquartered in Owings Mills.The Ravens were established in 1996, after Art Modell, who was then the owner of the Cleveland Browns, announced plans to relocate the franchise from Cleveland to Baltimore in 1995. As part of a settlement between the league and the city of Cleveland, Modell was required to leave the Browns' history and records in Cleveland for a replacement team and replacement personnel that would take control in 1999. In return, he was allowed to take his own personnel and team to Baltimore, where such personnel would then form an expansion team.

The Ravens have qualified for the NFL playoffs eleven times since 2000, with two Super Bowl victories (Super Bowl XXXV and Super Bowl XLVII), two AFC Championship titles (2000 and 2012), 15 playoff victories, four AFC Championship game appearances (2000, 2008, 2011 and 2012), five AFC North division titles (2003, 2006, 2011, 2012, and 2018), and are currently the only team in the NFL to hold a perfect record in multiple Super Bowl appearances. The Ravens organization was led by general manager Ozzie Newsome from 1996 until his retirement following the 2018 season, and has had three head coaches: Ted Marchibroda, Brian Billick, and John Harbaugh. With a record-breaking defensive unit in their 2000 season, the team established a reputation for relying on strong defensive play, led by players like middle linebacker Ray Lewis, who, until his retirement, was considered the "face of the franchise." The team is owned by Steve Bisciotti and valued at $2.5 billion, making the Ravens the 27th-most valuable sports franchise in the world.

Bulldog Turner

Clyde Douglas "Bulldog" Turner (March 10, 1919 – October 30, 1998) was an American football player and coach. He was elected, as a player, to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1960 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1966. He was also selected in 1969 to the NFL 1940s All-Decade Team.

Turner played college football as a center at Hardin–Simmons University from 1937 to 1939 and was selected as an All-American in 1939. After being selected by the Chicago Bears in the first round of the 1940 NFL Draft, he played professional football for the Bears, principally as a center on offense and linebacker on defense, for 13 years from 1940 to 1952. He was selected as a first-team All-Pro eight times (1940–1944, 1946–1948) and was a member of Bears teams that won NFL championships in 1940, 1941, 1943, and 1946.

After his playing career was over, Turner held assistant coaching positions with Baylor University (1953) and the Chicago Bears (1954–1957). He was the head coach of the New York Titans of the American Football League (AFL) during the 1962 AFL season.

Cameron Wake

Derek Cameron Wake (born January 30, 1982) is an American football outside linebacker for the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Penn State University, and was signed by the New York Giants as an undrafted free agent in 2005.

Wake has also played for the BC Lions of the Canadian Football League (CFL), earning the league's Most Outstanding Rookie Award in 2007. He recorded 39 sacks over his first two seasons in the CFL, earning Western Division All-Star honors as well as the Most Outstanding Defensive Player Award both years.

In 2009, Wake signed with the Miami Dolphins and has been with the team ever since, while establishing himself as one of the premier DEs in the NFL. Wake has been selected to 5 Pro Bowls (4 at DE, 1 at OLB), and is a four time first or second team All-Pro. His 98 career sacks (all with the Dolphins) ranks him 2nd all-time in club history, only to Hall of Famer Jason Taylor's 131 sacks, and also ranks 2nd all-time amongst "undrafted free agents", only to Hall of Famer John Randle's 137.5 sacks.

Derrick Brooks

Derrick Dewan Brooks (born April 18, 1973) is a former American football linebacker who played in the National Football League (NFL) for fourteen seasons. He played college football for Florida State University, and was twice recognized as a consensus All-American. He was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the first round of the 1995 NFL Draft, where he played his entire professional career. An eleven-time Pro Bowl selection and nine-time All-Pro, Brooks was named AP NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 2002, and earned a championship ring with the Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII. Later, he was elected to the 2000s all decade defensive team. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2014. He was the co-owner and president of the Tampa Bay Storm of the Arena Football League from 2011 to 2017.

Drive for the Cure 200

The Drive for the Cure 200 presented by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina is a NASCAR Xfinity Series stock car race that takes place at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, North Carolina. The 1985 race was extended to 400.5 miles (644.5 km), which still stands as the longest race distance run in Xfinity Series history.It is held before the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series' Bank of America Roval 400 in the playoffs.

In 2018, the race was shifted to run the "Roval" infield road course configuration of Charlotte. With this, the race length was shortened from 300 miles to 200 kilometers (125 miles). It would also move up a week on the Xfinity Series schedule, the middle race of the first round of the playoffs. Chase Briscoe became the first Xfinity Series driver to win the race in its Roval configuration.

Eric Berry

Eric Berry (born December 29, 1988) is an American football safety who is a free agent. He played college football at Tennessee, where he was a two-time unanimous All-American and recognized as the best collegiate defensive back in the country. He was then drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs fifth overall in the 2010 NFL Draft. Berry has been voted to the Pro Bowl five times and has been named to the First Team All-Pro three times.

Berry was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma on December 8, 2014. After going through chemotherapy in the offseason and being declared cancer free, Berry came back for the 2015 season and was named to the Pro Bowl, the AP All-Pro team, and was named the 2015 AP Comeback Player of the Year.

Jersey All Pro Wrestling

Jersey All Pro Wrestling (JAPW) is an independent wrestling promotion based in New Jersey, United States.

Joe Thomas (offensive tackle)

Joseph Hayden Thomas (born December 4, 1984) is a former American football offensive tackle who played his entire 11-season career for the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL), where he is widely considered to be one of the greatest offensive linemen of all time. He played college football for the University of Wisconsin, earned unanimous All-American honors, and was recognized as the top college interior lineman. The Browns chose Thomas with the third overall pick in the 2007 NFL Draft. He was invited to the Pro Bowl in each of his first 10 seasons and did not miss a single play in his career until the 2017 season (his final season in the NFL); his 10,363 consecutive snaps played is the longest streak since the NFL began recording snap counts in 1999.

Ndamukong Suh

Ndamukong Ngwa Suh ( in-DAH-mə-kin SOO, born January 6, 1987) is an American football defensive tackle who is a free agent of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Detroit Lions second overall in the 2010 NFL Draft. He played college football at Nebraska, where he earned All-American honors.

As a college senior, Suh became one of the most decorated players in college football history. He won numerous awards including the Associated Press College Football Player of the Year Award, Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Chuck Bednarik Award, Lombardi Award, and Outland Trophy, and was recognized as a unanimous All-American.Suh is recognized as one of the best defensive tackles in the NFL. In 2015, Suh was named the 24th best player in the NFL, while being the sixth highest ranked defensive player. He has won numerous awards and accolades, having been named the Defensive Rookie of the Year, while being selected to four Pro Bowls in his first five seasons, and having been named an All Pro six times. Four times to the All Pro First team, including his rookie year, and twice to the All Pro Second team. In 2015, Suh became the highest-paid defensive player in NFL history, having signed a six-year contract with the Miami Dolphins, worth in excess of $114 million, with nearly $60 million fully guaranteed; he was released after just three seasons. However, Suh has been criticized for his aggressive style of play and lack of sportsmanship. He has been fined eight times through 2014 for a total of $255,375 by the NFL, with seven for player-safety violations, and suspended once (for two games), resulting in the loss of an additional $165,294 in pay.

Nnamdi Asomugha

Nnamdi Goad Asomugha ( NAHM-dee AH-səm-wah; born July 6, 1981) is a Nigerian American actor, producer and former American football cornerback. He played college football for the University of California, Berkeley, and was drafted in the first round of the 2003 NFL Draft by the Oakland Raiders. He also played for the Philadelphia Eagles and San Francisco 49ers. For many years he was considered one of the best shutdown corners in the NFL. In his 11-year career, he was voted All-Pro four times, including two times to the first team.

Asomugha received critical acclaim for his portrayal of Carl King in the film Crown Heights (2017). He was nominated for an Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting Male and he was nominated for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture. Variety named him one of the seven breakout performers of 2017.

Patrick Willis

Patrick L. Willis (born January 25, 1985) is a former American football linebacker who played his entire eight-year career with the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the 49ers in the first round of the 2007 NFL Draft. He played college football for the University of Mississippi and received consensus All-American honors.

During Willis's senior season at Ole Miss, he received the Butkus Award and the Jack Lambert Award as the nation's top linebacker. A year later as a member of the 49ers, Willis led the NFL in tackles, earned first-team All-Pro and Pro Bowl honors while being named the 2007 AP NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year. Willis made the Pro Bowl in his first seven seasons in the NFL, and earned All-Pro honors in his first six years. He won the college Butkus Award in 2006 while at Ole Miss and in 2009, he won the professional Butkus Award while with the 49ers.

Ray Lewis

Raymond Anthony Lewis Jr. (born May 15, 1975) is a former American football linebacker who played all of his 17-year professional career for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He previously played college football for the University of Miami, and earned All-America honors. Lewis was drafted by the Ravens in the first round of the 1996 NFL Draft, and upon his retirement following the 2012 season, was the last remaining active player from the team's inaugural season.

Lewis played middle linebacker his entire career, and is considered to be one of the greatest ever to play the position. He was a 13-time Pro Bowler, a 10-time All-Pro, and one of the few players in NFL history to play in a Pro Bowl in three different decades (1990s, 2000s, and 2010s). He is also considered to be the greatest Baltimore Raven of all-time.Lewis pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice in connection with the stabbing deaths of two men in 2000. The following season, he won the NFL Defensive Player of the Year and led the Ravens' record-setting defense to victory in Super Bowl XXXV. Lewis also became the second linebacker to win the Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Award, and the first to win the award on the winning Super Bowl team. Lewis won his second Defensive Player of the Year award in 2003, becoming the sixth player to win the award multiple times. After a triceps tear that sidelined him for most of the 2012–13 season, Lewis returned for the Ravens' playoff run and earned his second Super Bowl victory in his final NFL game. On February 3, 2018, the fifth anniversary of his final game, Lewis was selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.

Terrell Suggs

Terrell Raymonn Suggs (born October 11, 1982), nicknamed "T-Sizzle," is an American football outside linebacker for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Arizona State, and was recognized as a unanimous All-American. He was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens tenth overall in the 2003 NFL Draft, and is the franchise's all-time leader in sacks.Suggs is a seven-time Pro Bowl selection, a two time All-Pro, was named NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 2011, and was part of the Ravens team that won Super Bowl XLVII, beating the San Francisco 49ers. As of the conclusion of the 2018 NFL season, Suggs is tied for 13th all-time in career sacks in NFL history.

Tyrann Mathieu

Tyrann Devine Mathieu (; born May 13, 1992) is an American football safety for the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Louisiana State University (LSU). In college he developed a reputation for causing turnovers, setting a Southeastern Conference (SEC) record with 11 career forced fumbles and earning the nickname "Honey Badger". In his sophomore season, he was recognized as a consensus All-American, won the Chuck Bednarik Award as the best defensive player in college football, and was a finalist for the Heisman Trophy. Mathieu was dismissed from the LSU football program after that season due to a violation of team rules.

After spending a year out of football in 2012, he was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals in the third round of the 2013 NFL Draft, reuniting him in the defensive backfield with former college teammate Patrick Peterson. As a rookie he was named to the PFWA All-Rookie Team. In 2015, he was invited to the Pro Bowl and earned first-team All-Pro honors. He has also played for the Houston Texans.

NFL All-Pro Teams
AFC
NFC

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