All-America

An All-America team is a hypothetical American sports team composed of outstanding amateur players. These players are broadly considered by media and other relevant commentators as the best players in a particular sport, of a specific season, for each team position.

Such athletes at the high school and college level are given the honorific title and typically referred to as "All-American athletes" or simply "All-Americans".

Term usage

As of 2009, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. The term is used primarily with regard to college and, occasionally, to high school players.

Note that similar terms exist for non-amateur athletes: outstanding professional players usually are referred to as "All-Stars", or, in the case of professional American football, "All-Pros": (as opposed to Pro Bowlers, who are selected by players, coaches, and fans to compete in Pro Bowl games).

Selection to an All-America team for collegiate (or high-school) players, however, is honorary in nature. "All-America teams" do not typically play any games as a unit, unlike many of the all-star teams.

The original use of the term "All-America" seems to have been in reference to a list of college football players who were regarded as the best at their respective positions. The first "All-America" team was the 1889 College Football All-America Team selected by Caspar Whitney and published in This Week's Sports in association with Walter Camp.[1]

In triathlons, USA Triathlon bestows the All America status on the top 10% within their age group.

The term has also been used in athletics in new ways to recognize the academic achievements of student-athletes as "Academic All-America" teams are named.[2] The term "Academic All-America" is a registered trademark of the College Sports Information Directors of America, which began the program in 1952 to recognize college athletes at all levels of competition and in all collegiate sports.

The term All-American is colloquially used to describe stereotypically clean-cut, mainstream or conventional American middle class people, particularly teenagers and young adults. Phenotypically, the stereotype suggests a blond-haired, light-eyed, WASP, Northern European, or "nordic" appearance. This usage was popularized by the radio series Jack Armstrong, the All-American Boy, which ran from 1933 to 1951. The "mainstream" culture was dominated by white Americans, but this connotation is changing along with demographics and acceptance of a multiracial society.[3][4]

The United States Army 82nd Airborne Division was given the nickname "All-American" because its members came from all 48 U.S. states which, at that time, constituted the United States (Hawaii and Alaska did not enter the union until 1959).

Collegiate sports

Each year different sets of All-American teams are recognized toward consensus and unanimous selection recognition. A "unanimous selection" is a player who is listed as a first team All-American by all recognized lists. A "consensus All-American" is a player who is listed as a first team All-American by at least half of the recognized lists. All-America teams are selected annually in various collegiate sports.

Archery

In collegiate archery competitions All-America selections are determined by the US Collegiate Archery (USCA) association. All-American honors are awarded for Olympic Recurve, Compound Target, and Bowhunter divisions. All-American honors are awarded to the top 10 archers in each division based on aggregate scores from the National Indoor and Intercollegiate Championships each year.

Baseball

In baseball, All-America teams are selected annually by the American Baseball Coaches Association and Collegiate Baseball.

Cross country running

Selections are administered by the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association (USTFCCCA). In Division I, the top 40 overall finishers at the national meet are all named to the All-America team. In Division III, as of 2017, the top 40 finishers garner All-American distinction (previously top 35). The student-athlete's team must be a member of the USTFCCCA.[5][6]

Fencing

Based on the NCAA Fencing Championships, the U.S. Fencing Coaches Association annually selects athletes for All-American first team, second team, third team, and honorable mention titles.

Football

The National Collegiate Athletic Association currently recognizes College Football All-America Teams selected by the Associated Press, American Football Coaches Association, Football Writers Association of America, Sporting News, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF) to determine consensus All-Americans.[7]

Golf

All-American honors are awarded by the GCAA for men's golf.

Gymnastics

In NCAA men's gymnastics, all American status is awarded to the top 8 finishers in the national championship.

Ice hockey

The American Hockey Coaches Association (AHCA) selects All-Americans at the Division I and Division III levels, for both men and women. For Division I men, they select a first- and a second-team for East and for West; for Division I women, they select national first- and second-teams. For Division III men, they select a first- and a second-team for East and for West; for Division III women, they select a first and second team for both East and West.

Lacrosse

The United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) annually selects men's lacrosse All-Americans, distinguished by first team, second team, third team, and honorable mention.[8]

The Intercollegiate Women's Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA) annually selects women's lacrosse All-Americans, distinguished by first team, second team, third team, and honorable mention.

US Lacrosse, the national governing body for men's and women's lacrosse, annually selects national boys' and girls' high school All-Americans.[9]

Rowing

The American Collegiate Rowing Association (ACRA) and Collegiate Rowing Coaches of America (CRCA) name All-American teams for men and women respectively.[10]

Rugby union

The term All-America was used for the student rugby teams that toured Australia in 1912 and New Zealand in 1913, see Rugby union in the United States.

Soccer

In soccer, the National Soccer Coaches Association of America annually names an eleven-member All-America team, as well as Division I women, and Division II and III teams.[11]

Swimming and diving

In NCAA swimming and diving, athletes and relay teams who make the championship final (top eight) are considered First-Team All-Americans. Athletes and relay teams that qualify for the consolation final (determines places 9–16) are considered Honorable Mention All-Americans.[12] All-American teams are selected by the College Swimming Coaches Association of America (CSCAA).

Tennis

The Intercollegiate Tennis Association annually selects men's and women's D-1 players with the following criteria SINGLES (denoted by 'S') 1.) Top 16 seed in NCAA Singles Championships, or 2.) Reach round of 16 in NCAA Singles Championships, or 3.) Finish in the Top 20 of the final ITA Rankings. DOUBLES (denoted by 'D') 1.) Top eight seed in NCAA Doubles Championships, or 2.) Reach quarterfinals of NCAA Doubles Championship, or 3.) Finish in Top 10 of final ITA Rankings.[13]

Track and field

Also administered by the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association, the selection rules are that the top eight finishers in each individual event, as well as American competitors who finish outside the top eight in their event but are among the top eight of the American finishers in an event, earn All-America designation. Relays are judged strictly on a top-eight basis. The cutoff of eight places is the same for both indoor and outdoor competition. The student-athlete's team must be a member of the USTFCCCA.[14] Eligible students from all three divisions and the NAIA are chosen.

Volleyball

The American Volleyball Coaches Association selects men's and women's All-America teams in all three NCAA divisions as well as the NAIA, USCAA and NCCAA.[15]

Wrestling

In all NCAA, NJCAA, NAIA, NCWA, and CCCAA divisions, the top 6 or 8 placers at the national championship tournament are considered All-Americans.[16]

High school sports

At the high school level, noted All-America teams are selected by Parade magazine in football, and from 1957 to 2015 in basketball.[17] Also in basketball, the McDonald's restaurant chain selects players annually for its McDonald's All-American Game,[18] and there is also a Ballislife All-American Game. In football, there is the U.S. Army All-American Bowl and the Under Armour All-America Game. Since 2000, the United States Army has sponsored its own annual All-American high school football competition, the U.S. Army All-American Bowl, which includes an All-American football team, split East and West, and an All-American marching band.

In 2005, Offense-Defense Sports began publishing a Top 100 ranking for nation's the top high school football athletes.[19] The Offense-Defense All-American Bowl is held every January, featuring the 88 top-ranked high school seniors.[20]

Athletes who place in the top 15 of each gender division at the Foot Locker Cross Country Championships, a series of annual cross country running races which are held in various regions of the US, are awarded All-American honors.[21]

The National Interscholastic Swim Coaches Association publishes an Academic All America Awards list for graduating seniors that have maintained a minimum GPA of 3.750, and have lettered in their high school programs in swimming, diving, or water polo.[22]

The National High School Coaches Association also honors the nation's top student athletes on a yearly basis, as "High School Academic All-Americans".[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ The All-America Team for 1889 selected by Casper Whitney is identified in the NCAA guide to football award winners Archived July 14, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "CoSIDA - Academic All-America". Web.archive.org. September 13, 2007. Retrieved June 9, 2018.
  3. ^ "Do America's Changing Demographics Impact Politics?". Retrieved July 24, 2011.
  4. ^ Springer, Sarah (April 6, 2012). "Can there ever again be an 'all-American' beauty?". CNN. Retrieved October 24, 2012.
  5. ^ "Washington women win NCAA cross country title", The Seattle Times, November 25, 2008
  6. ^ "USTFCCCA NCAA Division II Cross Country Media Handbook" (pdf format), Ustfccca.org, August 19, 2009
  7. ^ Deitch, Scott E. (Ed), 2002 NCAA Football's Finest (pdf format), National Collegiate Athletic Association, February 2002
  8. ^ USILA All-American Teams, United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association, 2009
  9. ^ "2013 All-America Teams". US Lacrosse. July 17, 2013. Archived from the original on August 29, 2013. Retrieved August 22, 2013.
  10. ^ "Athlete Awards - Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association". Collegerowcoach.org. Retrieved June 9, 2018.
  11. ^ "NSCAA Awards", National Soccer Coaches Association of America
  12. ^ "ACC Records 18 All-American Performances and a national champion at 2006 NCAA Men's Swimming & Diving Championship" Archived May 7, 2006, at the Wayback Machine, Atlantic Coast Conference, March 31, 2006, "All-America honors go to student-athletes who finish 1–8 (both individual events and relay events); Honorable Mention All-America honors go to those who finish 9–16."
  13. ^ 2004 ITA All-America Teams Archived July 26, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  14. ^ USTFCCCA All-Americans, U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches Association
  15. ^ "AVCA All-America Awards". avca.org.
  16. ^ Morris, Tim, "Four-time All-American Gaeta in rare company", April 18, 2007, "Top 8 finishers earn All-American" Archived January 24, 2013, at Archive.today
  17. ^ O'Shea, Michael, "Meet PARADE's All-America High School Football Team", Parade, 2 March 2009
  18. ^ "The Selection Process", McDonald's All-American High School Basketball Games
  19. ^ "Offense-Defense All-American Bowl", Offense Defense Sports Archived November 12, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  20. ^ "Local players headed to 2010 Offense-Defense game", Miami Herald, October 12, 2009
  21. ^ Gerweck, Jim, "It's the Little Things: Foot Locker Tidbits", Running Times Magazine
  22. ^ "Academic All America Award". National Interscholastic Swim Coaches Association. Retrieved 15 August 2017.
  23. ^ "Academic All Americans". National High School Coaches Association. Retrieved 15 August 2017.
2009 College Football All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team for a specific season composed of the best amateur players at each position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in American team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media.

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original All-America team was the 1889 College Football All-America Team selected by Caspar Whitney and Walter Camp. In 1950, the National Collegiate Athletic Bureau, which is the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) service bureau, compiled the first list of All-Americans including first-team selections on teams created for a national audience that received national circulation with the intent of recognizing selections made from viewpoints that were nationwide. Since 1952, College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) has bestowed Academic All-American recognition on male and female athletes in Divisions I, II, and III of the NCAA as well as National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics athletes, covering all NCAA championship sports.The 2009 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following College Football All-American first teams: Associated Press (AP), Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF), The Sporting News (TSN), Sports Illustrated (SI), Pro Football Weekly (PFW), ESPN, CBS Sports (CBS), College Football News (CFN), Rivals.com, and Scout.com.

Currently, NCAA compiles consensus all-America teams in the sports of Division I-FBS football and Division I men’s basketball using a point system computed from All-America teams named by coaches associations or media sources. The system consists of three points for first team, two points for second team and one point for third team. Honorable mention and fourth team or lower recognitions are not accorded any points. Football consensus teams are compiled by position and the player accumulating the most points at each position is recognized as a consensus first-team all-American. Currently, the NCAA recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, and the WCFF to determine consensus All-Americans.

Academic All-America

The Academic All-America program is a student-athlete recognition program. The program selects an honorary sports team composed of the most outstanding student-athletes of a specific season for positions in various sports—who in turn are given the honorific "Academic All-American". Since 1952, CoSIDA has bestowed Academic All-American recognition on male and female athletes in Divisions I, II, and III of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) as well as NAIA athletes, covering all championship sports. The award honors student-athletes who have performed well academically while regularly competing for their institution.

It is sponsored by and presented as the Google Cloud Academic All-America® Award, having been previously sponsored by Capital One (2011–18), ESPN The Magazine (2004–2010), Verizon (2000–04) and GTE (1985–2000), and is administered by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA). The award was known as the CoSIDA Academic All-America until 1985. The phrases "Academic All-America" and "Academic All-American" are protected trademarks of CoSIDA.

Prior to 2011, there were two sets of teams chosen: One for Division I and one for all other Divisions, NAIA, two-year colleges and Canadian schools. In 2011, the program was expanded to include four sets of honorary teams: one for each of NCAA Divisions I, II and III as well as a "College Division" for NAIA, two-year colleges and Canadian schools. The College Division was dissolved after the 2017–18 school year and replaced by an NAIA division restricted to members of that governing body. In each program, regional Academic All-District selections are made with the first-team All-District selections being eligible for Academic All-America team selections.

All-America City Award

The All-America City Award, given by the National Civic League, is the oldest community recognition program in the United States. The Award, bestowed yearly on 10 communities, recognizes the work of communities in using inclusive civic engagement to address critical issues and create stronger connections among residents, businesses and nonprofit and government leaders. Once called the “Nobel Prize for constructive citizenship” – it has been awarded to more than 500 communities across the country. The Award is open to all American communities, from major cities, counties and regions to tribes, neighborhoods, towns and villages. In applying, communities reflect on their strengths, weaknesses, challenges and the progress they have made.

Each year hundreds of leaders, volunteers, and young people from the finalist communities travel to Denver to present the story of their work and their community to a jury of national experts. The awards conference includes workshops on promising practices.

Since the program's inception in 1949, more than 500 communities have been named All-America Cities. Each year, interested communities submit a comprehensive package based on published criteria that are evaluated in the award selection process. Deserving communities are named as finalists, and the year's ten award winners are named from that pool of applicants.

All-America Football Conference

The All-America Football Conference (AAFC) was a professional American football league that challenged the established National Football League (NFL) from 1946 to 1949. One of the NFL's most formidable challengers, the AAFC attracted many of the nation's best players, and introduced many lasting innovations to the game. However, the AAFC was ultimately unable to sustain itself in competition with the NFL. After its folding, three of its teams were admitted to the NFL: the San Francisco 49ers, the Cleveland Browns and the original Baltimore Colts (not to be confused with the later Baltimore Colts team, now the Indianapolis Colts).

The AAFC was the second American professional football league (the first being the third American Football League of 1940–1941) to have its teams play in a double round robin format in the regular season: each team had a home game and an away game with each of the other AAFC teams.

The Cleveland Browns were the AAFC's most successful club, winning every annual championship in the league's four years of operation.

All-American Girls Professional Baseball League

The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL) was a professional women's baseball league founded by Philip K. Wrigley which existed from 1943 to 1954. The AAGPBL is the forerunner of women's professional league sports in the United States. Over 600 women played in the league, which consisted of eventually 10 teams located in the American Midwest. In 1948, league attendance peaked at over 900,000 spectators. The most successful team, the Rockford Peaches, won a league-best four championships. The 1992 motion picture A League of Their Own is a mostly fictionalized account of the early days of the league and its stars.

Baseball America

Baseball America is a sports magazine that covers baseball at every level, with a particular focus on up-and-coming players in high school, college, Japan, and the minor leagues. It is currently published in the form of a bi-weekly newspaper, five annual reference book titles, a weekly podcast, and a website. It also regularly produces lists of the top prospects in the sport, and covers aspects of the game from a scouting and player-development point of view. The publication's motto is "Baseball news you can't find anywhere else."

College Football All-America Team

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original use of the term All-America seems to have been to the 1889 College Football All-America Team selected by Caspar Whitney and published in This Week's Sports in association with football pioneer Walter Camp. Camp took over the responsibility for picking the All-America team and was recognized as the official selector in the early years of the 20th century.

Football Writers Association of America

The Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) is one of the organizations whose College Football All-America Team is recognized by the NCAA. The organization also selects the Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year, the Bronko Nagurski Trophy winner, the Outland Trophy winner, the Grantland Rice Trophy winner, a freshman All-America team, and weekly defensive player of the week, as well as developing scholarship programs and surveys for better working conditions. Since 1954, the association has awarded the Grantland Rice Trophy to the college football team they choose to be the National Champion.

Gonzaga Bulldogs men's basketball

The Gonzaga Bulldogs are the intercollegiate men's basketball program representing Gonzaga University. The school competes in the West Coast Conference in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The Gonzaga Bulldogs play home basketball games at the McCarthey Athletic Center in Spokane, Washington on the university campus.

Gonzaga has had 15 of its players receive the WCC Player of the Year award, and two players, Frank Burgess in 1961 with 32.4 points per game, and Adam Morrison in 2006 with 28.1 points per game, have led the nation in scoring. Adam Morrison was named the Co-National Player of the year for the 2005–06 season.

Since the mid-1990s, Gonzaga has established itself as one of the closest things to a major basketball power in a mid-major conference. They have been to every NCAA Tournament since 1999, a year in which they made a Cinderella run to the Elite Eight, and have appeared in every final AP poll since the 2008–09 season. They have also appeared in all but one WCC conference title game since 1995, and in every conference title game since 1998, winning 16 of them. This culminated in 2016–17, when the Bulldogs went to their first Final Four in school history, advancing all the way to the national championship game.

Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball

The Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball team is an American college basketball team that represents the University of Kentucky. Kentucky is the most successful NCAA Division I basketball program in history in terms of both all-time wins (2,263) and all-time winning percentage (.764). The Wildcats are currently coached by John Calipari.

Kentucky leads all schools in total NCAA tournament appearances (59), NCAA tournament wins (126), NCAA Tournament games played (177), NCAA Sweet Sixteen appearances (43), NCAA Elite Eight appearances (37), and total postseason tournament appearances (65). Further, Kentucky has played in 17 NCAA Final Fours (tied for 2nd place all-time with UCLA), 12 NCAA Championship games, and has won 8 NCAA championships (second only to UCLA's 11). In addition to these titles, Kentucky won the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) in both 1946 and 1976, making it the only school to win multiple NCAA and NIT championships. Kentucky also leads all schools with sixty-three 20-win seasons, fifteen 30-win seasons, and six 35-win seasons.

Throughout its history, the Kentucky basketball program has featured many notable and successful players, both on the collegiate level and the professional level. Kentucky holds the record for the most NBA Draft selections (125) as well as the most #1 NBA Draft picks (3). The Wildcats have also been led by many successful head coaches, including Adolph Rupp, Joe B. Hall, Eddie Sutton, Rick Pitino, Tubby Smith, and John Calipari. Kentucky is the only program with 5 different NCAA Championship coaches (Rupp, Hall, Pitino, Smith, Calipari). Three Kentucky coaches have been enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame: Rupp, Pitino, and Calipari. Former Wildcat players that have gone on to become head coaches include C.M. Newton, Pat Riley, Dan Issel, Dwane Casey, John Pelphrey, and Travis Ford.

List of NCAA Division I men's soccer First-Team All-America teams

The Division I First-Team All-Americans are the best eleven Division I U.S. college soccer players as selected by United Soccer Coaches.

List of players in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame

The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, located in Springfield, Massachusetts, honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches, referees, and other major contributors to the sport. It is named after Dr. James Naismith, who conceived the sport in 1891; he was inducted into the Hall as a contributor in 1959. The Player category has existed since the beginning of the Hall of Fame. For a person to be eligible on the ballot for Hall of Fame honors as a player, he or she must be fully retired for three years. If a player retired for a short period, then "his/her case and eligibility is reviewed on an individual basis".

As part of the inaugural class of 1959, four players were inducted; over 150 more individuals have been inducted as players since then. Four players have also been inducted as coaches: John Wooden in 1973, Lenny Wilkens in 1998, Bill Sharman in 2004, and Tom Heinsohn in 2015.

Of the inducted players, 25 were also members of teams that have been inducted into the Hall as units.

Henry "Dutch" Dehnert, Nat Holman, and Joe Lapchick were members of the Original Celtics.

William "Pop" Gates and John Isaacs were members of the New York Renaissance. The induction category of another former player for the team, Nathaniel "Sweetwater" Clifton, is subject to dispute; he was originally announced as a contributor, but is now listed with player inductees by the Hall.

Marques Haynes and Reece "Goose" Tatum were two of the most famous players of the Harlem Globetrotters. Three other players who made their greatest contributions with other teams—Wilt Chamberlain, Connie Hawkins, and Lynette Woodard—were members of the Globetrotters at some point in their professional careers. Furthermore, longtime member Meadowlark Lemon has been inducted as a contributor, and the aforementioned Clifton, who briefly played for the team, is (depending on definitions) a member as either a player or contributor.

Walt Bellamy, Jerry Lucas, Oscar Robertson, and Jerry West were members of the 1960 United States Olympic Team.

Charles Barkley, Larry Bird, Clyde Drexler, Patrick Ewing, Magic Johnson, Michael Jordan, Karl Malone, Chris Mullin, Scottie Pippen, David Robinson, and John Stockton were members of the 1992 United States Olympic Team, better known as the "Dream Team". In fact, all but one of the players on the "Dream Team" roster (Christian Laettner) have been inducted in the Hall of Fame as individuals.

Maya Moore

Maya April Moore (born June 11, 1989) is an American professional basketball player for the Minnesota Lynx of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA), who is on sabbatical. Naming her their inaugural Performer of the Year in 2017, Sports Illustrated called Moore the greatest winner in the history of women's basketball.In high school, she was the National Gatorade Player of the Year, the Gatorade Female Athlete of the Year, and a McDonald's All-American. She played forward for the UConn women's basketball team, and won back to back national championships in 2009 and 2010. She was selected as the John Wooden Award winner in 2009 after leading Connecticut to the undefeated national championship. The following season, Moore led Connecticut to its second straight national championship and continued its overall undefeated streak at 78; in the 2010–11 season, she led the Huskies in extending that streak to an NCAA both-gender record (all divisions) of 90. That season, Moore became the first female basketball player to sign with Jordan Brand. After the 2017 season, her won-loss record in the U.S. since high school was 497–78.Moore was the first overall pick in the 2011 WNBA Draft, and joined a Minnesota Lynx team that already featured all-star caliber players in Seimone Augustus, Rebekkah Brunson and Lindsay Whalen. Since 2011, Moore has continued to excel, both with the Lynx and with overseas teams in Europe and China. Moore has won four WNBA championships (2011, 2013, 2015, 2017), WNBA Most Valuable Player Award (2014), WNBA Finals MVP Award (2013), three WNBA All-Star Game MVPs (2015, 2017, 2018), two Olympic gold medals, (2012, 2016), scoring title (2014), and the WNBA Rookie of the Year Award (2011). She has also been selected to four WNBA All-Star teams and three All-WNBA teams. In 2012, she won both the Spanish league title and EuroLeague title playing for Ros Casares Valencia. From 2013 to 2015, Moore also won the Chinese league title every year.

McDonald's All-American Game

The McDonald's All-American Game is the all-star basketball game played each year for American and Canadian boys' and girls' high-school basketball graduates. Consisting of the top players, each team plays a single exhibition game after the conclusion of the high-school basketball season, in an East vs. West format. As part of the annual event, boys and girls compete in a slam dunk contest, a three-point shooting competition, and an overall timed skills competition. It is rare for girls to compete in the slam dunk contest. However, in 2004 Candace Parker won that very contest. The boys' game has been contested annually since 1978, and the girls game has been played each year since it was added in 2002.

The McDonald's All-American designation began in 1977 with the selection of the inaugural team. That year, the All-Americans played in an all-star game against a group of high school stars from the Washington, D.C. area. The following year, the McDonald's game format of East vs. West was begun with a boys contest. In 2002, with the addition of a girls contest, the current girl-game / boy-game doubleheader format began.

The McDonald's All-American Team is the best-known of the American high-school basketball All-American teams. Designation as a McDonald's All-American instantly brands a player as one of the top high-school players in the United States or Canada. Selected athletes often go on to success in college basketball. Every college team to win the NCAA men's championship since 1978 has had at least one McDonald's All-American on its roster, except for the 2002 Maryland Terrapins and 2014 Connecticut Huskies.The teams are sponsored by the fast-food chain, McDonald's. Proceeds from the annual games go to local Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) and their Ronald McDonald House programs.

Michael Crabtree

Michael Alex Crabtree Jr. (born September 14, 1987) is an American football wide receiver who is currently a free agent. He was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers 10th overall in the 2009 NFL Draft, he also played for the Oakland Raiders and Baltimore Ravens. He played college football at Texas Tech, where he was a two-time unanimous All-American and twice won the Fred Biletnikoff Award as the nation's best wide receiver.

NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The NCAA Men's Basketball All-American teams are teams made up of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball players voted the best in the country by a variety of organizations.

Parade (magazine)

Parade is an American nationwide Sunday newspaper magazine, distributed in more than 700 newspapers in the United States. It was founded in 1941 and is owned by Athlon Media Group, which purchased it from Advance Publications. The most widely read magazine in the U.S., Parade has a circulation of 32 million and a readership of 54.1 million. As of 2015, its editor is Anne Krueger.

Parade All-America Boys Basketball Team

The Parade All-America Boys Basketball Team was an annual selection by Parade that nationally honored the top high school boys' basketball players in the United States. It was part of the Parade All-American series that originated with boys basketball before branching to other sports. Started by the Sunday magazine in 1957, it had been the longest ongoing selection of high school basketball All-Americans in the country at the time of its final selections in 2015. Many of the honorees went on to star as college and professional basketball players. As of March 2011, there were 162 Parade All-Americans that were playing in the National Basketball Association (NBA).At its onset, the selections were handled by a New York-based public relations firm, Publicity Enterprises, which was led by Haskell Cohen, who was a former sportswriter as well as the publicity director for the NBA at the time (1950–1969). The first All-America team in 1957 consisted of three five-player teams, and the first-team selections appeared on television on The Steve Allen Show. The following year, 20 players were selected and participated in the first annual Parade All-American high school game. The list later expanded to 40 of the nation's top players, divided into four teams of 10 each. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, known then as Lew Alcindor, became the first sophomore in 1963 to be named a Parade All-American. Fifteen years later, Earl Jones became the next sophomore to earn first-team honors, and subsequently joined Abdul-Jabbar as the first two players to be named to the first team on three occasions. "It was a real thrill for me to make it on the Parade list early, when I was just a sophomore. The recognition is a great thing for kids to shoot for," said Abdul-Jabbar as part of the announcement for the 2000 team.Starting in 2011, the selections were compiled in conjunction with Sporting News and their writer, Brian McLaughlin. Candidates also began to be limited to players in their senior year. The selections went to a single-team format in 2012, and the size was reduced from 40- to a 20-player first team in 2014. McLaughlin described the selections as mostly Division I college-bound players that had a stellar senior year in high school. Additionally, Parade differentiated itself from most other All-American teams by not focusing solely on a player's standing among college recruiters. For example, some selectors might choose top recruits that had been injured much of their senior year. Parade discontinued its boys' basketball All-America selections after 2015.

Tupelo, Mississippi

Tupelo is a city in, and county seat of, Lee County, Mississippi, United States. With an estimated population of 38,114 in 2017, Tupelo is the seventh-largest city in Mississippi and is considered a commercial, industrial, and cultural hub of North Mississippi.

Tupelo was incorporated in 1867, although the area had earlier been settled as "Gum Pond" along the Mobile and Ohio Railroad. On February 7, 1934, Tupelo became the first city to receive power from the Tennessee Valley Authority thus giving it the nickname "The First TVA City." Much of the city was devastated by a major tornado in 1936 that still ranks as one of the deadliest tornadoes in American history. Following electrification, Tupelo boomed as a regional manufacturing and distribution center and was once considered a hub of the American furniture manufacturing industry. Although many of Tupelo's manufacturing industries have declined since the 1990s, the city has continued to grow due to strong healthcare, retail, and financial service industries. Tupelo is the smallest city in the United States that is the headquarters of more than one bank with over $10 billion in assets.Tupelo has a deep connection to Mississippi's music history, being associated with artists as diverse as Elvis Presley, Rae Sremmurd, and Diplo. The city is home to multiple art and cultural institutions, including the Elvis Presley Birthplace and the 10,000-seat BancorpSouth Arena, the largest multipurpose indoor arena in Mississippi. Tupelo is the only city in the Southern United States to be named an All-America City five times, most recently in 2015.The Tupelo micropolitian area contains Lee, Itawamba, and Pontotoc counties and had a population of 140,081 in 2017.

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