Alison Brackenbury

Alison Brackenbury (born 1953 Gainsborough, Lincolnshire[1] ) is a British poet.

Alison Brackenbury
NationalityBritish

Life

After studying English at St Hugh’s College, Oxford[1] she now lives in Gloucestershire.[2] Her work has appeared in the Kenyon Review,[3] Ploughshares.[4] Stand,[5]

Awards

Works

  • "In the gap"; "Affairs"; "Plucked from", The Chimera, October 2007
  • "When"; "Mud"; "March ending"; "Passing", nthposition, March 2008
  • "6.25", The Guardian, 2 February 2008
  • "Obit". Magma 39. November 2007.
  • "Autumn Street". Magma 19.
  • "Have you heard?; The story of Sigurd; A fuel blockade". Signals. Summer 2004.
  • Dreams of Power. Carcanet New Press. 1981. ISBN 978-0-85635-352-9.
  • Breaking Ground. Carcanet. 1985. ISBN 978-0-85635-503-5.
  • Christmas Roses. Carcanet. 1988. ISBN 978-0-85635-750-3.
  • Selected Poems. Carcanet. 1991. ISBN 978-0-85635-924-8.
  • 1829. Carcanet. 1995. ISBN 978-1-85754-122-9.
  • After Beethoven. Carcanet. 2000. ISBN 978-1-85754-454-1.
  • Bricks and Ballads. Carcanet. 2004. ISBN 978-1-85754-751-1.
  • Singing in the dark. Carcanet. 2008. ISBN 978-1-85754-914-0.
  • Shadow. HappenStance. 2009. ISBN 978-1-905939-35-0.

Reviews

Singing in the Dark is Alison Brackenbury's seventh collection of poetry. Her work has always been characterised by a concern with stillness and natural detail, by a closeness to the ballad form, and, most of all, by a quiet lyricism and delight that is constantly being challenged, constantly under threat. The book's title is taken from the opening poem, "Edward Thomas's daughter", in which the final stanza sets up the book's challenge:

"The robin brushes me at dusk. /
Our good bones fail. We leave no mark. /
His voice, she writes, was clear and quiet. /
I hear him singing in the dark."

That last line captures a sense not only of fragility but also of defiance and this distinctive combination underpins the new collection.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b Alison Brackenbury | poetryarchive.org Retrieved 2018-02-14.
  2. ^ "The Chimaera, October 2007: Alison Brackenbury". www.the-chimaera.com. Retrieved 2016-04-11.
  3. ^ "Alison Brackenbury". The Kenyon Review. 17: 77–78. 1995. JSTOR 4337249. Retrieved 25 May 2013.
  4. ^ "Read By Author | Ploughshares". www.pshares.org. Retrieved 2016-04-11.
  5. ^ Stand.
  6. ^ Charles Bainbridge (8 March 2008). "At home with the horses". The Guardian.

External links

1953 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

1981 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

1982 in literature

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1982.

1982 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

1984 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

1988 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

1995 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

1997 in literature

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1997.

1997 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

Adam Thorpe

Adam Thorpe (born 5 December 1956, Paris, France) is a British poet and novelist whose works also include short stories, translations, radio dramas and documentaries. He is a frequent contributor of reviews and articles to various newspapers, journals and magazines, including the Guardian, the Poetry Review and the Times Literary Supplement.

B O D Y

B O D Y is an international online literary magazine publishing new work on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. It publishes short stories, poetry, creative nonfiction, reviews, translations, essays, artworks, photography, performance texts and has been noted for its elegant, intuitive design and for its editorial vision. B O D Y was founded in Prague by Christopher Crawford, Joshua Mensch and Stephan Delbos in 2012. It is published in English language.

Cholmondeley Award

The Cholmondeley Award (CHUM-lee) is an annual award for poetry given by the Society of Authors in the United Kingdom. Awards honour distinguished poets, from a fund endowed by the Dowager Marchioness of Cholmondeley in 1966. Since 1991 the award has been made to four poets each year, to the total value of £8000.

Claire Crowther

Claire Crowther is a British poet and author of three full-length poetry collections, The Clockwork Gift, Stretch of Closures, and On Narrowness, and three pamphlets, Bare George, Mollicle, and Glass Harmonica. Crowther is co-editor of Long Poem Magazine.

Eric Gregory Award

The Eric Gregory Award is a literary award given by the Society of Authors to British poets under 30 on submission. The awards are up to a sum value of £24,000 annually.

The award is the result of a bequest made in 1959 by Eric Craven Gregory (also known as Peter Gregory), chairman of publishers Lund Humphries, from his estate to the Incorporated Society of Authors, Playwrights and Composers to form the "Eric Gregory Trust Fund" for the benefit and encouragement of young poets who are British subjects.

New Walk

New Walk is a high quality poetry and arts print magazine published at Leicester University, Leicester, England, but with a national and international focus. The magazine was established in 2010. It is edited by Rory Waterman and Nick Everett, with the fiction edited by Libby Peake. New Walk mainly publishes poetry, but also includes poetry book reviews, interviews with major poets, essays, fiction and artwork.

Representative contributors: Alice Oswald, J.M. Coetzee, Ian Parks, Alan Jenkins, William Logan, Alison Brackenbury, Timothy Murphy, Mark Ford, Andrew Motion, David Mason, Dawn Potter, Tom Pow, Grevel Lindop.

Nicky Arscott

Nicky Arscott is a poet and artist who lives and works near Machynlleth, Powys, Wales.

Numbers (magazine)

Numbers was a literary magazine published twice a year in Cambridge, England, between 1986 and 1990. Six issues of the magazine appeared, of which the last was a double issue to celebrate the ninetieth birthday of the American poet and novelist Janet Lewis. Issue 4 was a celebration of the Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa.

Each issue contained an editorial, poems, translations and prose by poets.

Numbers was founded and edited by John Alexander, Alison Rimmer, Peter Robinson and Clive Wilmer.

The magazine emerged from the editors' involvement with the 1977 to 1985 Cambridge Poetry Festivals, and with the exhibition Pound's Artists at Kettle's Yard and the Tate Gallery.

Shit Creek Review

The Shit Creek Review is an online literary and art magazine (webzine or e-zine). Its content is mostly related to poetry, and includes work belonging the differing styles of formalism and free verse by established authors and new writers. It draws on the authors and resources of a number of online poetry forums, such as Eratosphere and The Gazebo.

The Flea (online poetry journal)

The Flea is an online literary and art magazine (webzine or e-zine). Its content is mostly related to poetry, and includes work belonging the differing styles of formalism and free verse by established authors and new writers. It draws partly on the authors and resources of a number of online poetry forums, such as Eratosphere and The Gazebo.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.