Alii nui of Hawaii

The following is a list of Aliʻi nui of Hawaiʻi.

Aliʻi nui refers to the supreme ruler (sometimes called the "King" or Moi) of the island. Aliʻi refers to the ruling class of Hawaiʻi prior to the formation of the united kingdom. Here, "Hawaiʻi" refers to the island of Hawaiʻi, also called "the Big Island".

Aliʻi nui of the Big Island

Unbroken line of rule to this point. Hakau, Liloa's first born and named heir, was overthrown by Liloa's second son Umi-a-Liloa; however, the hereditary line of Liloa is unbroken and continues.

Hereditary line of Liloa is broken by the usurping rule of Alapainui.

The usurping line of rule ends with Keaweʻopala who is killed in battle while his son and heir, Kalaimanokahoʻowaha, did survive to greet Captain James Cook. The hereditary line of Liloa resumes through the grandson of Keaweʻīkekahialiʻiokamoku, Kalaniʻōpuʻu.

Kalaniʻōpuʻu's line ends with the death of Kīwalaʻō by Kamehameha's forces.

See also

Hineuki

See also "Hina (chiefess)".Hineuki (also called Hinakeʻuki or simply Hina; keuki = "tantalizer") was a Hawaiian noble lady and the Chiefess of the island of Hawaiʻi as the wife of Kukohou, Aliʻi Nui of Hawaiʻi. She was named after the goddess Hina, who was one of the most important deities in the religion of the Ancient Hawaiians.

Jocelyne LaGarde

Jocelyne LaGarde (1924 – 12 September 1979) was a Native Tahitian woman who became famous for her first and only acting role in the 1966 motion picture, Hawaii, for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

Kahaimoelea

Kahaimoelea was a Hawaiian chief, who ruled as the Aliʻi Nui of Hawaiʻi from 1285 to 1315. He was the sovereign king or chief of the island of Hawaiʻi. He is sometimes referred as Kahai IV or Kahiamoeleaikaʻaikupou.

Waipio Valley was first occupied as a royal residence by Kahaimoelea.Kahaimoelea was a son of Chief Kalapana of Hawaiʻi by his wife, Lady Malamaʻihanaʻae. He followed his father as the sovereign of Hawaiʻi and fathered Kalaunuiohua by his half-sister Kapoʻakaʻuluhailaʻa (Kapo-a-Kauluhailea).

Kalaninuiamamao

Kalaninuiamamao (sometimes called Ka-I-i-Mamao or Kaeamamao) was a prince of the Big Island of Hawaiʻi, or 1st Aliʻi Nui of Kaʻū, an ancestor of the Queen Liliuokalani. He is probably the Hawaiian chief with the most varied spelling of his name.

The Kumulipo was composed in honor of his birth and was passed by him to his daughter Alapaiwahine.

Keakamahana

Keakamāhana (c. 1615–1665) was an aliʻi nui of Hawaiʻi island 1635–1665. She ruled as sovereign of the island from the royal complex at Hōlualoa Bay.

Keaweʻōpala

Keaweʻōpala is the first born son of Alapainui (the usurping Aliʻi nui of Hawaii Island) and his wife Keaka, who cared for Kamehameha the Great in his youth along with her sister Hākau. He would inherit his father's position after being named heir by Alapainui shortly before his death.His was a short rule of just 1 year beginning around 1754. He was overthrown by Kalaniʻōpuʻu.Keaweʻopala would father a child with Moana Wahine, named Kalaimanokahoʻowaha also known as Kanaʻina, who would be taken into the new king's court to serve as a royal attendant as a new aliʻi line of secondary chiefs serving the supreme ruler of the island and the kingdom. Kanaʻina would cohabitate with his half sister from his mother Moana Wahine, Hākau. Her father was Heulu. The couple would have a child named Hao, the grandson of Keaweʻopala. Hao's daughter was Luahine. Luahine's daughter was Kōnia, who was the mother of Bernice Pauahi Bishop, the three times great granddaughter of Keaweʻopala.With Namoe he had a son Kanekoa. With Keoua he had a daughter Peleuli. With Kaukuhakuonana he had two sons Kanehiwa and Kuapuu. Kanehiwa married a cousin named Kaulunae and were the parents of Lipoa and Julia Moemalie. Kanekoa's grandson was Joseph Heleluhe, who was the private secretary of Queen Liliuokalani.

Keākealaniwahine

Keakealaniwahine (c. 1640-1695), was a High Chiefess and ruler Aliʻi Nui of Hawaiʻi island.

Kukailani

Kūkaʻilani was a Hawaiian chief, a father of the Queen Kaikilani, aliʻi nui of Hawaiʻi. He was also a father of Makakaualiʻi.

Kīwalaʻō

Kīwalaʻō (1760-1782) was the aliʻi nui of the Island of Hawaii in 1782 when he was defeated in battle and overthrown by Kamehameha I.

Laakapu

Laʻakapu was an ancient Hawaiian noble lady and a High Chiefess of the Big Island (Hawaiʻi) as a wife of Kahoukapu, Aliʻi Nui of Hawaiʻi. She was the mother of the High Chief Kauholanuimahu, who succeeded his father.

List of state leaders in 1461

This is a list of heads of state, heads of governments, and other rulers in the year 1461.

List of state leaders in 1462

This is a list of heads of state, heads of governments, and other rulers in the year 1462.

List of state leaders in 1463

This is a list of heads of state, heads of governments, and other rulers in the year 1463.

List of state leaders in 1464

This is a list of heads of state, heads of governments, and other rulers in the year 1464.

List of state leaders in 1465

This is a list of heads of state, heads of governments, and other rulers in the year 1465.

List of state leaders in 1466

This is a list of heads of state, heads of governments, and other rulers in the year 1466.

List of state leaders in 1468

This is a list of heads of state, heads of governments, and other rulers in the year 1468.

Pilikaaiea

Pilikaʻaiea (or Pili-auau; the short form: Pili) was Aliʻi Nui of Hawaiʻi. He was a sovereign king or chief, who deposed the indigenous chief, Kapawa.

ʻEhu

ʻEhu was an ancient Hawaiian nobleman (Aliʻi) and the Chief of Kona (a place on the island of Hawaiʻi).

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