Alişar Hüyük

Alishar Hüyük (in modern Yozgat Province, Turkey) was an ancient Near Eastern city. It is near the modern village of Alişar, Sorgun.

Alishar Hüyük
Alishar Hüyük is located in Turkey
Alishar Hüyük
Alishar Hüyük
Location in Turkey
Coordinates: 39°36′22″N 35°15′41″E / 39.60611°N 35.26139°E

Coordinates: 39°36′22″N 35°15′41″E / 39.60611°N 35.26139°E

Vessel with a quatrefoil mouth, Alishar, Middle Bronze Age III, 1750-1650 BC, ceramic - Oriental Institute Museum, University of Chicago - DSC07648
Vessel with a quatrefoil mouth, Alishar, Middle Bronze Age III, 1750-1650 BC, ceramic - Oriental Institute Museum, University of Chicago

History

Alishar Hüyük was occupied beginning in the Chalcolithic Period, through the Bronze Age and the Hittites, and into Phrygian times. A number of Hittite-era cuneiform tablets in Old Assyrian of the Cappadocia type were found there.[1] Mention in those tablets of the town Amkuwa has caused speculation that the site is the Ankuwa mentioned in other Hittite texts.

Archaeology

The site was excavated between 1927 and 1932 by a team from the Oriental Institute of Chicago. The work was led by Erich Schmidt. [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] Excavation resumed in 1992, led by Ronald Gorny as part of the Alisar Regional Project, though most of the work has been at nearby Çadır Höyük. [9] [10]

Çadır Höyük

About 12km northwest of Alishar Huyuk, there's another important archaeological site named Cadir Hoyuk (Çadır Höyük in Turkish alphabet).

Recent excavators of Cadir Hoyuk have identified this site tentatively with the Hittite city of Zippalanda. [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18]

Evidence of the first known settlement at Cadir Hoyuk has been radio-carbon dated to the Early Chalcolithic (5300-4500 BC); nevertheless the occupation may well be even earlier than that, and go back to Neolithic (ca. 5500 BC).

Cadir Hoyuk appears to have flourished during the Middle and Late Bronze Age (2000-1100 BC), continuing into the Iron Age.

Notes

  1. ^ I. J. Gelb, Inscriptions from Alishar and Vicinity, Oriental Institute Publications 27, The University of Chicago Press, 1935
  2. ^ [1] Hans Henning von der Osten and Erich F. Schmidt, Researches in Anatolia 2. The Alishar Hüyük Season of 1927, Part 1, Oriental Institute Publications 6, The University of Chicago Press, 1930
  3. ^ [2] Hans Henning von der Osten and Erich F. Schmidt, Researches in Anatolia 3. The Alishar Hüyük Season of 1927, Part 2, Oriental Institute Publications 7, The University of Chicago Press, 1932
  4. ^ [3] Erich F. Schmidt, Researches in Anatolia 4. The Alishar Hüyük Season of 1928, Part 1, Oriental Institute Publications 19, The University of Chicago Press, 1932
  5. ^ [4] Erich F. Schmidt, Researches in Anatolia 5. The Alishar Hüyük Season of 1928 and 1929, Part 2, Oriental Institute Publications 20, The University of Chicago Press, 1933
  6. ^ [5] Hans Henning von der Osten, Researches in Anatolia 7. The Alishar Hüyük Seasons of 1930-1932, Part 1, Oriental Institute Publications 28, The University of Chicago Press, 1937
  7. ^ [6] Hans Henning von der Osten, Researches in Anatolia 8. The Alishar Hüyük Seasons of 1930-1932, Part 2, Oriental Institute Publications 29, The University of Chicago Press, 1937
  8. ^ [7] Hans Henning von der Osten. Researches in Anatolia 9. The Alishar Hüyük Seasons of 1930-1932, Part 3, Oriental Institute Publications 30, The University of Chicago Press, 1937
  9. ^ Ronald L.Gorny, The 1993 Season at Alishar Höyük in Central Turkey, Anatolica, vol. 20, pp. 191-202, 1994
  10. ^ Ronald L. Gorny et al., The 1999 Alishar Regional Project Season, Anatolica, vol. 26, pp. 153-171, 2000
  11. ^ [8] Ronald L. Gorny, ALISAR REGIONAL PROJECT, Oriental Institute 2005-2006 Annual Report, pp 13-22, 2006
  12. ^ [9] Ronald L. Gorny, CADIR HOYUK, Oriental Institute 2006-2007 Annual Report, pp 15-33, 2007
  13. ^ [10] Ronald L. Gorny, CADIR HOYUK, Oriental Institute 2008-2009 Annual Report, pp 18-35, 2009
  14. ^ [11] Gregory McMahon, Çadir Höyük, Oriental Institute 2011-2012 Annual Report, pp 15-19, 2012
  15. ^ [12] Gregory McMahon, Çadir Höyük, Oriental Institute 2013-2014 Annual Report, pp 22-26, 2014
  16. ^ [13] Gregory McMahon, Çadir Höyük, Oriental Institute 2014-2015 Annual Report, pp 21-27, 2015
  17. ^ [14] Gregory McMahon, Çadir Höyük, Oriental Institute 2015-2016 Annual Report, pp 13-17, 2016
  18. ^ Site History Çadır Höyük Archaeological Project - www.cadirhoyuk.com

See also

References

  • Ronald L. Gorny, The Biconvex Seals of Alishar Höyük, Anatolian Studies, vol. 43, pp. 163–191, 1993
  • Erich Schmidt, Anatolia Through the Ages: Discoveries at the Alishar Mound, 1927–1929, Oriental Institute Communication 11, University of Chicago Press, 1931
  • Ronald L. Gorny, Hittite Imperialism and Anti-Imperial Resistance As Viewed from Alișar Höyük, Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research, no. 299/300, The Archaeology of Empire in Ancient Anatolia, pp. 65–89, 1995

External links

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