Alfred Bendixen

Alfred Bendixen is a lecturer in the department of English at Princeton University and the founder and Executive Director of the American Literature Association.

Bendixen gained a Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina in 1979, with a thesis on "Americans in Europe before 1865 : a study of the travel book".[1] He held posts at Barnard College (1979-1988) and California State University, Los Angeles (1988-2005) before moving to Texas A&M University, where he served as the Associate Department Head of English (2007-2009) and a Professor of English (2006 - 2013).[2] He now serves as a Lecturer in English at Princeton University.[3]

His research has centered on the recovery of 19th century literature and neglected genres, including the ghost story, detective fiction, science fiction, and travel writing.[4]

Selected publications

  • Haunted women : the best supernatural tales by American women writers (1985, F. Ungar, ISBN 9780804420525)
  • Edith Wharton: New Critical Essays (1992, Garland, ISBN 9780824078485, with Annette Zilversmit)
  • The Whole Family, new edition and introduction to this 12-author 1908 novel (2001, Duke UP, ISBN 9780822328384)
  • The Cambridge Companion to American Travel Writing (2009, Cambridge UP, ISBN 9780521861090, with Judith Hamera)
  • A Companion to the American Short Story (2010, Wiley-Blackwell, ISBN 9781405115438, with James Nagel)
  • A Companion to the American Novel (2012,Wiley-Blackwell, ISBN 9781118220399)
  • The Cambridge History of American Poetry (2014, Cambridge UP, ISBN 9781107003361, co-edited with Stephen Burt)

References

  1. ^ "Catalog record". Worldcat. Retrieved 17 January 2014.
  2. ^ "Alfred Bendixen". Faculty. Department of English, Texas A&M University. Retrieved 17 January 2014.
  3. ^ https://english.princeton.edu/people/alfred-bendixen-0
  4. ^ https://english.princeton.edu/people/alfred-bendixen-0

External links

  • "Alfred Bendixen". Faculty. Department of English, Texas A&M University. Retrieved 17 January 2014.
American Literature Association

The American Literature Association (ALA) is "a coalition of societies devoted to the study of American authors". It has some 110 affiliated societies, mostly concerned with the work of a particular author (e.g. the Emily Dickinson International Society or the Thoreau Society), some thematic such as the Society of Early Americanists. It was founded in 1989.It holds an annual conference, alternating between east coast and west coast venues, attracting about 850 delegates. Some societies choose to have one of their own main meetings as part of the ALA conference, and many sessions of the conference are sponsored by member societies. There are no plenary sessions at the conference, but seven or eight simultaneous events in each time slot.The ALA has an Executive Board and a "Council of American Authors Societies", which represents the member organizations. The Executive Director is Alfred Bendixen, who has held this post since the association's beginnings in 1989.

Bendixen

Bendixen is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Aage Bendixen (1887-1973), Danish actor

Alfred Bendixen, American literatary scholar

Fanny Bendixen (c. 1820-1899), Canadian gold-rush hotelier

Finn Bendixen (born 1949), Norwegian long-jumper

Friedrich Bendixen (1864–1920), German banker

Harry Bendixen (1901-1954), Danish footballer and journalist

Niclas Bendixen (born 1972), Danish theatre director

Ole Bendixen (1869-1958), Danish explorer

Ole Christian Bendixen (born 1947), Norwegian sailor

Ulla Bendixen, Danish folktronic musician

Caverns (novel)

Caverns is a 1989 novel written collaboratively as an experiment by Ken Kesey and a creative writing class that he taught at the University of Oregon. The cover of the book says it was written by O.U. Levon—the name of this supposed author, spelled backwards, is "novel U.O." (University of Oregon). The full list of authors is: Robert Blucher, Ben Bochner, James Finley, Jeff Forester, Bennett Huffman, Lynn Jeffress, Ken Kesey, Neil Lidstrom, H. Highwater Powers, Jane Sather, Charles Varani, Meredith Wadley, Lidia Yukman and Ken Zimmerman.

Gal Young Un

Gal Young 'Un is a 1979 American drama film directed by Victor Nuñez.

Garrett Hongo

Garrett Kaoru Hongo (born May 30, 1951, Volcano, Hawai'i) is a Yonsei, fourth-generation Japanese American academic and poet. The work of this Pulitzer-nominated writer draws on Japanese American history and own experiences.

Margaret Wilson (writer)

Margaret Wilson (January 16, 1882 – October 6, 1973) was an American novelist. She was awarded the 1924 Pulitzer Prize for The Able McLaughlins.

PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay

The PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay is awarded by the PEN American Center to an author for a book of original collected essays. The award was founded by PEN Member and author Barbaralee Diamonstein and Carl Spielvogel, former New York Times columnist, "to preserve the dignity and esteem that the essay form imparts to literature." The winner receives a cash award of $10,000.The award was on hiatus from 2005 to 2010.The award is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN affiliates in over 145 PEN centres around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes.

PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Biography

The PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award is awarded by the PEN American Center to honor a "distinguished biography possessing notable literary merit which has been published in the United States during the previous calendar year." The award carries a $5,000 prize.

The award was established by Rodman L. Drake. Previous judges include Brad Gooch, Benjamin Taylor, and Amanda Vaill.

The award is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN affiliates in over 145 PEN centers around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes.

PEN/Jean Stein Book Award

PEN/Jean Stein Book Award is awarded by the PEN American Center to honor a "a book-length work of any genre for its originality, merit, and impact". With an award of $75,000 it is one of the richest prizes given by the PEN American Center. It was first award in 2017.

The award is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN affiliates in over 145 PEN centers around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes.

PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award

The PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for nonfiction is awarded by the PEN American Center biennially "to a distinguished book of general nonfiction possessing notable literary merit and critical perspective and illuminating important contemporary issues which has been published in the United States during the previous two calendar years. It is intended that the winning book possess the qualities of intellectual rigor, perspicuity of expression, and stylistic elegance conspicuous in the writings of author and economist John Kenneth Galbraith, whose four dozen books and countless other publications continue to provide an important and incisive commentary on the American social, intellectual and political scene." The winner receives $10,000.

The award is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN affiliates in over 145 PEN centres around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes.

PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry

The PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry is awarded by the PEN American Center in odd-numbered years in recognition of a book of poetry with "high literary character" by a new and emerging American poet of any age with "the promise of further literary achievement." The winner receives $5,000.

The award is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN affiliates in over 145 PEN centres around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes.

PEN/Nabokov Award

The PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature is awarded biannually by the PEN American Center to writers, principally novelists, "whose works evoke to some measure Nabokov's brilliant versatility and commitment to literature as a search for the deepest truth and the highest pleasure— what Nabokov called the 'indescribable tingle of the spine'." The winner is awarded $50,000 as of 2016. The award is financed by the Vladimir Nabokov Foundation, founded by Dmitri Nabokov. It has been called one of the most prestigious PEN prizes.In 2016, after an eight year hiatus, the award was revived with changes. The prize money was increased from US$20,000 to US$50,000, and the name was changed from PEN/Nabokov Award for Fiction to PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature. The criteria of the award was changed to those born or residing outside the United States, meaning previous winners Ozick, Roth, and Gass wouldn't have qualified for this version of the award.

The award is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN affiliates in over 145 PEN centres around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes.

PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation

The PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation, named in honor of U.S. translator Ralph Manheim, is a literary award given every three years by PEN American Center (the U.S. chapter of International PEN) to a translator "whose career has demonstrated a commitment to excellence through the body of his or her work". The Medal is awarded in recognition of a lifetime's achievements in the field of literary translation.

It was first presented in 1982, to Gregory Rabassa, who has translated works by Gabriel García Márquez, Mario Vargas Llosa, and other Latin American literary giants. The next award will be announced in 2018.

The medal is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN affiliates in over 145 PEN centers around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes. The PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal was called one of "the most prominent translation awards."

PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize

The PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize is awarded by the PEN American Center "to exceptionally talented fiction writers whose debut work — a first novel or collection of short stories...represent distinguished literary achievement and suggests great promise." The winner is selected by a panel of PEN Members made up of three writers or editors. The PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize was originally named the PEN/Robert Bingham Fellowship for Writers. The prize awards the debut writer a cash award of US$25,000.

The PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize was established in memory of Robert W. Bingham, who died in 1999 at the age of 33, to commemorate his support of young writers, his love of literature, and his contribution to literary fiction.The award is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN affiliates in over 145 PEN centres around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes.

PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry

The PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry is given biennially to an American poet whose distinguished and growing body of work to date represents a notable and accomplished presence in American literature.The award is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN affiliates in over 145 PEN centers around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes.

PEN Award for Poetry in Translation

The PEN Award for Poetry in Translation is given by the PEN American Center to honor a poetry translation published in the preceding year. The award should not be confused with the PEN Translation Prize. The award is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN in over 145 PEN centers around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes. The award was called one of "the most prominent translation awards."

Roman à clef

Roman à clef (French pronunciation: ​[ʁɔmɑ̃n a kle], anglicised as ), French for novel with a key, is a novel about real life, overlaid with a façade of fiction. The fictitious names in the novel represent real people, and the "key" is the relationship between the nonfiction and the fiction. The "key" may be produced separately by the author or implied through the use of epigraphs or other literary techniques.Created by Madeleine de Scudéry in the 17th century to provide a forum for her thinly-veiled fiction featuring political and public figures, the roman à clef has since been used by writers including Sylvia Plath, John Banville, Truman Capote, Simone de Beauvoir, Ernest Hemingway, George Orwell, Jack Kerouac, Victor Hugo, Blaise Cendrars, Philip K. Dick, Bret Easton Ellis, Jay McInerney, Naguib Mahfouz, John McGahern, Charles Bukowski, Malachi Martin, Saul Bellow, Hunter S. Thompson, James Joyce, and Djuna Barnes.

The reasons an author might choose the roman à clef format include satire; writing about controversial topics and/or reporting inside information on scandals without giving rise to charges of libel; the opportunity to turn the tale the way the author would like it to have gone; the opportunity to portray personal, autobiographical experiences without having to expose the author as the subject; avoiding self-incrimination or incrimination of others that could be used as evidence in civil, criminal, or disciplinary proceedings; and the settling of scores.

Biographically inspired works have also appeared in other literary genres and art forms, notably the film à clef.

The Whole Family

The Whole Family: a Novel by Twelve Authors (1908) is a collaborative novel told in twelve chapters, each by a different author. This unusual project was conceived by novelist William Dean Howells and carried out under the direction of Harper's Bazaar editor Elizabeth Jordan, who (like Howells) would write one of the chapters herself. Howells' idea for the novel was to show how an engagement or marriage would affect and be affected by an entire family. The project became somewhat curious for the way the authors' contentious interrelationships mirrored the sometimes dysfunctional family they described in their chapters. Howells had hoped Mark Twain would be one of the authors, but Twain did not participate. Other than Howells himself, Henry James was probably the best-known author to participate. The novel was serialized in Harper's Bazaar in 1907-08 and published as a book by Harpers in late 1908.

Toby Tyler; or, Ten Weeks with a Circus

Toby Tyler; or, Ten Weeks with a Circus is a children's novel by "James Otis", the pen name of James Otis Kaler.

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