Alexander C. Irvine

Alexander Christian Irvine (born March 22, 1969) is an American fantasy and science fiction writer. Many of his works have appeared under the simpler moniker "Alex Irvine."[2]

Alexander C. Irvine
BornAlexander Christian Irvine
March 22, 1969 (age 49)[1]
Ypsilanti, Michigan
OccupationWriter, lecturer and reporter
NationalityAmerican
EducationB.A. University of Michigan
M.A. in English, University of Maine
PhD, University of Denver
GenreScience fiction, supernatural

Biography

Irvine was born on March 22, 1969.[3] Irvine first gained attention with his Locus Award-winning 2002 novel A Scattering of Jades (which also won the Crawford Award in 2003) and the stories that would form the 2003 collection Unintended Consequences. He has also published the Grail Quest novel One King, One Soldier (2004), and the World War II-era historical fantasy The Narrows (2005).[4] He released a collection of thirteen short stories called Pictures from an Expedition in 2006.[4] Buyout, a novel set in 2041, was published by Random House in 2009.

In addition to his original works, Irvine has published Have Robot, Will Travel (2004), a novel set in Isaac Asimov's positronic robot milieu; and Batman: Inferno (2006), about the DC Comics superhero. His novel The Ultimates: Against All Enemies, about the Marvel Comics superhero team was published by Pocket Books in September 2007. He also wrote the Vertigo Encyclopedia.[5][6][7] As well as writing about comics he has written a number of comic book series, including one featuring Daimon Hellstrom for the Marvel Comics imprint MAX,[8][9] Daredevil Noir,[10][11] and "Iron Man: The Rapture."[12]

He has worked on Alternate Reality Games including The Beast and I Love Bees and is the writer of the Facebook game Marvel: Avengers Alliance.[13]

Irvine has a B.A. from the University of Michigan (1991), an M.A. from the University of Maine (1996), and a Ph.D. from the University of Denver (2003).[4] From 2005-11, he was an assistant professor of English at the University of Maine.[4] He also worked for a time as a reporter at the Portland Phoenix.[14] He is married with twins, a boy and girl, and two younger children. [4] Irvine is vehemently opposed to the use of ketchup as a condiment for eggs, the only exception being in the case of egg sandwiches.[15] He was until recently a professor at the University of Southern Maine.

Bibliography

Original fiction

  • A Scattering of Jades (2002, ISBN 0-7653-0116-4)
  • One King, One Soldier (2004, ISBN 0-345-46696-9)
  • The Narrows (2005, ISBN 0-345-46698-5)
  • The Life of Riley (2005, ISBN 1-59606-013-1)
  • Buyout (2009, ISBN 0-345-49433-4)
  • Mystery Hill (novella, PS Publishing, 2009, ISBN 978-1-906301-40-8)
  • Irvine, Alex (2012). Mare Ultima. PS Publishing.

Licensed work

  • Have Robot, Will Travel (2004, ISBN 1-59687-151-2)
  • Batman: Inferno (October 2006, ISBN 0-345-47945-9)
  • The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007, ISBN 1-4165-1071-0)
  • The Supernatural Book of Monsters, Spirits, Demons, and Ghouls (September 2007, ISBN 0-06-136703-6)
  • Irvine, Alex (2008). Dougall, Alastair, ed. The Vertigo Encyclopedia. New York: Dorling Kindersley. ISBN 0-7566-4122-5. OCLC 213309015.
  • Supernatural: John Winchester's Journal (February 2009, ISBN 0-06-170662-0)
  • Iron Man: Virus (January 2010)
  • Iron Man 2 (April 2010, ISBN 978-0-446-56458-8)
  • Transformers: Exodus (June 2010, ISBN 978-0-345-51985-6)
  • Transformers: Exiles (2011)
  • The Seal of Karga Kul: A Dungeons & Dragons Novel (December 2010)
  • Star Wars: Mandorla (Cancelled)
  • The Adventures of Tintin: A Novel (Movie Tie-In) (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers (November 2011, ISBN 0-316-18579-5)
  • Batman: Arkham Knight - The Riddler's Gambit (Prequel to Batman: Arkham Knight) (June 2015, ISBN 9781783292509)

Comics

  • Hellstorm: Son of Satan -- Equinox #1-5 (art by Russell Braun) (Marvel MAX, October 2006-February 2007)
  • Daredevil Noir: Liar's Poker #1-4 (art by Tomm Coker) (Marvel, April–July 2009)
  • The Murder of King Tut #1-5 (adapted from the novel by James Patterson, art by Christopher Mitten and Ron Randall) (IDW, June–October 2010)
  • Iron Man: The Rapture #1-4 (art by Lan Medina) (Marvel Knights, November 2010-January 2011)
  • Dark Sun: Ianto's Tomb #1-5 (January 2011-)

Awards and honors

As listed in Contemporary Authors.[4]

  • Lennie Isaacs Memorial Award, Clarion Writer's Workshop, 1993
  • Steve Grady Poetry Award, University of Maine, 1995
  • Albert Morton Turner Essay Prize, University of Maine, 1995
  • Technology in the First-Year English Classroom Award, University of Denver, 1999
  • Travel and dissertation research grant, ColRoMorA Family Foundation, 1999
  • Best Web site of the Year, Entertainment Weekly, for The Beast, 2001
  • Best Ideas of the Year, The New York Times, for The Beast, 2001
  • Pushcart Prize nomination for "Snapdragons", 2002
  • Best First Novel, Locus, for A Scattering of Jades, 2003
  • Best First Novel, International Horror Guild, for A Scattering of Jades, 2003
  • Crawford Award for best first novel, for A Scattering of Jades, 2003
  • International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts, for A Scattering of Jades, 2003
  • New England Press Award for investigative journalism, 2004
  • International Game Developers Association award for innovation, for I Love Bees, 2005
  • Critic's choice award, 48-hour Film Project, for "Music Box", 2006
  • Year's Best Science Fiction and Fantasy, for "Wizard's Six", 2007

Notes

  1. ^ Date information sourced from Library of Congress Authorities data, via corresponding WorldCat Identities linked authority file (LAF).
  2. ^ Scifi.com
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ a b c d e f Irvine, Alexander C. Contemporary Authors. January 1, 2008. Archived from the original on March 14, 2016. Retrieved June 29, 2013. – via HighBeam Research (subscription required)
  5. ^ CCI: The Vertigo Encyclopedia, Comic Book Resources, July 29, 2008
  6. ^ VanderMeer, Jeff. Alex Irvine and the Vertigo Encyclopedia, Omnivoracious, September 30, 2008
  7. ^ Alex Irvine talks us through our case of Vertigo, Forbidden Planet blog, November 14, 2008
  8. ^ Shout at the Devil: Irvine talks "Son of Satan", Comic Book Resources, June 2, 2006
  9. ^ WW Philadelphia - Axel Alonso on The Return of Hellstrom (cached), Newsarama, June 2, 2006
  10. ^ 'Daredevil Noir' Q&A With Writer Alex Irvine Archived 2009-08-02 at the Wayback Machine, Wizard Universe, September 12, 2008
  11. ^ The Man Who Would be King(pin): Irvine on Daredevil Noir, Comic Book Resources, April 3, 2009
  12. ^ http://www.popmatters.com/pm/feature/134278-my-own-private-singularity-iron-man-rapture-and-the-horror-the-horro/
  13. ^ http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118050892
  14. ^ "University of Maine faculty page". Archived from the original on 2010-06-03. Retrieved 2009-04-02.
  15. ^ https://www.facebook.com/alexandercirvine/posts/10153355621179402?pnref=story

References

Alexander Irvine

Alexander Irvine may refer to:

Alexander C. Irvine, American fantasist and science fiction writer

Derry Irvine, Baron Irvine of Lairg, British lawyer and political figure

Alexander Irvine (MP), British Member of Parliament for East Looe

Alexander Forbes Irvine of Drum FRSE

Alexander Irwin, also spelled Irvine, British Army general

China Mountain Zhang

China Mountain Zhang is a 1992 science fiction novel by American writer Maureen F. McHugh. The novel is made up of several stories loosely intertwined.

Crawford Award

See also Crawford MedalThe IAFA William L. Crawford Fantasy Award (short: Crawford award) is a literary award given to a writer whose first fantasy book was published during the preceding 18 months. It's one of several awards presented by the International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts (IAFA), and is presented at the conference each March in Orlando. The award is named after the publisher and editor, William L. Crawford.The Prize was conceived and established with the help of Andre Norton, who continued to sponsor it for many years.

Detroit in literature

Detroit, Michigan, and its suburbs, is the setting for a number of novels and short story collections, including:

Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932 (Journey to the End of the Night, 1934)

Harriette Arnow, The Dollmaker 1954

Rainelle Burton, The Root Worker, 2001

Jim Daniels, Detroit Tales 2003

Jeffrey Eugenides, The Virgin Suicides 1993 and Middlesex 2002

Arthur Hailey, Wheels 1971

Gary Hardwick, The Executioner's Game 2005

William X. Kienzle, The Rosary Murders 1979

Elmore Leonard, City Primeval: Detroit at High Noon 1980

Joyce Carol Oates, them 1968

Harold Robbins, The Betsy 1971

James O'Barr, The Crow 1981

Marge Piercy, "Braided Lives"

Patrick O'Leary, Door Number Three 1995

Jeffry Scott Hansen Warpath 2003

Paul Clemens, Made in Detroit 2005

Alexander C. Irvine, The Narrows 2005

Joe Borri, Eight Dogs Named Jack 2007

Frank Anthony Polito, Band Fags! 2008

Gun, with Occasional Music

Gun, with Occasional Music is a 1994 novel by American writer Jonathan Lethem. It blends science fiction and hardboiled detective fiction. It was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1994.

Hammered (Bear novel)

Hammered is a science fiction novel by Elizabeth Bear first published on 28 December 2004 by Bantam Spectra. The book won the 2006 Locus Award for Best First Novel. It is the first book of a trilogy made of Hammered, Scardown, and Worldwired.

Heart-Shaped Box (novel)

Heart-Shaped Box (2007) is the debut horror novel of author Joe Hill. The book was published on February 13, 2007 by William Morrow.

Isaac Asimov's Robots and Aliens

Isaac Asimov's Robots and Aliens is a series of novels written by various authors and loosely connected to Isaac Asimov's Robot series. Each volume is complete in itself, but they form a continuing series. The series follows the action of the novels of the Isaac Asimov's Robot City series, with the same protagonists Derec and Ariel, and many other characters. The plot deals with the Three Laws and encounters between robots and different varieties of alien life.

Changeling by Stephen Leigh (1989)

Renegade by Cordell Scotten (1989)

Intruder by Robert Thurston (1990)

Alliance by Jerry Oltion (1990)

Maverick by Bruce Bethke (1990)

Humanity by Jerry Oltion (1990)

List of Batman enemies in other media

Various villains of the American comic book superhero Batman have been created over the years for media adaptations that previously did not exist in the comics. This is a list of such villains, and original villains that share the same moniker as characters from the comic books are noted.

List of Deus Ex media

Deus Ex is a cyberpunk franchise created by Ion Storm and owned and published by Eidos Interactive and later Square Enix.

Locus Award for Best First Novel

Winners of the Locus Award for Best First Novel, awarded by the science fiction and fantasy magazine Locus. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year. The award for Best First Novel was first presented in 1981.

Lugnut (Transformers)

Lugnut is the name of several fictional characters from the Transformers universe. Both are Decepticon jets who are loyal to Megatron.

Singularity's Ring

Singularity's Ring is the debut science fiction book by Paul Melko. The novel was published on February 5, 2008 by Tor Books.

Tea with the Black Dragon

Tea with the Black Dragon is a 1983 fantasy novel by R. A. MacAvoy. It was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1983, the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1984, and the Locus Award for best first novel in 1984; it also earned MacAvoy the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. It also found a place in David Pringle's Modern Fantasy: The Hundred Best Novels (1988).

The Hercules Text

The Hercules Text is a 1986 science fiction novel by American writer Jack McDevitt. It tells the story of a message of intelligent extraterrestrial origin received by SETI scientists. The Hercules Text was nominated for the Philip K. Dick Award in 1986.Science fiction author Michael Swanwick said, in an overview of McDevitt's work, "Jack's first novel, The Hercules Text, appeared in 1986 as an Ace Special, putting him in the august company of such luminaries as William Gibson, Kim Stanley Robinson, and Lucius Shepard. It was a good book."

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